Rendering for Print

DrStrik9

Scene Destroyer
My personal favorite dpi script is ... drum roll .. my calculator. :)

[Size in Inches] TIMES [Resolution per Inch] (i.e. 300 dpi, 450 dpi, etc.)
EQUALS the number of pixels the image needs to be rendered.

Example: Image needs to be 26.5" in width, to be printed @ 450 dpi:

26" x 450 dpi = 11925 pixels

Really simple.
 

Matt

Valiant NewTeKnight
My personal favorite dpi script is ... drum roll .. my calculator. :)

[Size in Inches] TIMES [Resolution per Inch] (i.e. 300 dpi, 450 dpi, etc.)
EQUALS the number of pixels the image needs to be rendered.

Example: Image needs to be 26.5" in width, to be printed @ 450 dpi:

26" x 450 dpi = 11925 pixels

Really simple.

If you work in inches, but for those that don't it's more hassle.
 

DrStrik9

Scene Destroyer
If you work in inches, but for those that don't it's more hassle.

Pixels per cm or pixels per inch: pixel-dimension is derived by exactly the same arithmetic. So why would one of them be a hassle? Sorry, I just don't get it.

300 pixels per inch is the same as 118.11 per cm. 450 per inch = 177.165 per cm. After that, just substitute numbers and calculate.
 
Last edited:

lardbros

Not so newbie member
Dunno!? Is it because we use DPI in our printing, yet measure out page sizes in mm? We'd have to convert our measurements to inches first wouldn't we? Anyway... It's late, I might be wrong, and surely it's easier having a script that does it all for you? ;)
 

Matt

Valiant NewTeKnight
Pixels per cm or pixels per inch: pixel-dimension is derived by exactly the same arithmetic. So why would one of them be a hassle? Sorry, I just don't get it.

300 pixels per inch is the same as 118.11 per cm. 450 per inch = 177.165 per cm. After that, just substitute numbers and calculate.

Because you need to convert metric to imperial to do the calculations, and not everyone knows the conversion math in their head!

It just makes it easier, if you're happy with a calculator, that's great, others prefer an easier, quicker solution, because we're lazy!
 

buco

New member
My rule of thumb for big print is: 1 meter 1000 pixels; so, 6x3 meters (usually the target I work for) 6000*3000. Once you've set your standard it's easy to have the idea without big calculations..
Obviously this numbers change if I have to print for magazines or smaller formats.
Anyway, if you know dpi and final print dimensions, input these values in photoshop (in feet, inches, meters or millimeters as you like) and it will display the corresponding pixels resolution for your render without any hassle for your brain :)

@ daforum:
dpi information is only for the printer and paper, monitors only use pixels. So if you have a 1000x1000 resolution image it will be displayed always the same on your monitor even if you change dpi setting. Only when you print it you'll notice the difference in dimensions because you'll set different dots density with dpi. Basically dpi says to the printer how much space your 1000 pixels will occupy on your paper
 

daforum

da what?
Thanks for the info buco :thumbsup:
I need to render (bigger) from now on so when I just change the dpi (not the pixel dimensions) in photoshop I'll be guaranteed to get the correct size for print.

Matt's DPI script will be good for calculating the pixel size to render in LightWave.
 

moussepipi2000

New member
Hi matt. i tried your script , its very useful but maybe for the bleed option, instead of increasing only pixel resolution it would be cool to see the camera become wider (Focal shorter if the bleed is superior to 0) . so when i decided my final image with lightwave camera and lunch your script i can set bleed and it will render larger my image (resolution and filed of view). in that case No problem at all for the bleed !
 

converse

New member
Much depends on the detail required of final print. How far away will the audience be to the item itself, type of paper,equipment used etc. This seems like a basic print job. Over complicate it at your mercy.
 
Top Bottom