Making of: Don't go through the ground!

This posting refers to this thread.

Making of: Don't go through the ground!

Even though this was only a few minutes project, there are a few things that might be interesting to some.
Right at the first explanation of the "Motion Limit" method I had the stupid idea for a rubber animal animation.

Positionlimits_12.gif


The planning: The purpose of the project was to use the "Ray Cast Geometry" method with an animated terrain.

As already mentioned in the corresponding thread, the surface of the terrain must be visible from underneath.
the following happens: the IK controller is animated so that its Y height is 0. From this position, the "Ray Cast Geometry" node looks up and measures the distance to the nearest geometry.

MO_Schwimmreifen_03.gif

Because the swim tyre also has a closed surface at the bottom, problems could occur (the "Ray Cast Geometry" node could "see" the wrong geometry).
Since I wanted to create the floaty hoop in "Marvelous Designer" the quickest way was to split the hoop into top and bottom parts and let "Ray Cast Geometry" node look for the upper part only (Marvelous Designer offers the possibility to export the objects unwelded).

Just briefly on the Marvelous Designer part: I made a very simple pattern for the float. Then I sewed it together and pumped it up.

MO_Schwimmreifen_09.jpg

Although Marvelous Designer can record pumping up I did the inflation step by step and exported the intermediate steps as obj. This somewhat more cumbersome method had the following purpose. Firstly, it gives you precise control over the individual pump-up steps. Secondly, Marvelous Designer does not behave in the same way when recording an animation as it does when simply simulating it.

However, in the end I had 9 individual objects of the inflating floating hoop.

In Layout I used a method that may not be familiar to everyone.
Instead of making endomorphs out of the individual objects and using Morph Mixer, I used Morphing.

MO_Schwimmreifen_01.jpg

This allows you to morph an object into another object. And the second object into a next one and so on (all objects must have the same number and order of vertices).
And the advantage is: this whole morph chain can be controlled with a single envelope.

Let's get one thing straight: Simplified, you could also morph the flat object directly into the pumped-up object. But that would not be the same. The inflation does not take place linearly. With several intermediate stages, the animation becomes more organic.

This is what the envelope of the morph looks like. 100 means that the first morph is finished, 200 means that the second morph is finished, and so on.

MO_Schwimmreifen_02.jpg

Bonus material: another method would be to save the animation as mdd. And then animate the play back speed step by step. A negative speed ensures that the floating tyre sinks again slightly after each pumping.

MO_Schwimmreifen_10.jpg

For budget reasons, the same genoma rig also had to play the pumping guy (you only see the feet of the first one anyway). So it was scaled down and inserted into the original animation using split screen.

Most of the time it took to convert the animation into an animated gif (until the file was small enough to be uploaded to the forum). ;)

What is still missing is a rendered image, until now we have only seen OpenGL images.

MO_Schwimmreifen_07.jpg

MO_Schwimmreifen_08.jpg


Maybe this will be of use to someone.

ciao
Thomas
 
Last edited:

RPSchmidt

Active member
That was an excellent breakdown, Thomas... thank you very much for sharing!

Personally, I appreciate a look into the various methods used to accomplish your animation. I've used Morph Mixer and mdd many times, but I wasn't familiar with Morphing at all.
 

prometheus

REBORN
This posting refers to this thread.

Making of: Don't go through the ground!

Even though this was only a few minutes project, there are a few things that might be interesting to some.
Right at the first explanation of the "Motion Limit" method I had the stupid idea for a rubber animal animation.

View attachment 149985

The planning: The purpose of the project was to use the "Ray Cast Geometry" method with an animated terrain.

As already mentioned in the corresponding thread, the surface of the terrain must be visible from underneath.
the following happens: the IK controller is animated so that its Y height is 0. From this position, the "Ray Cast Geometry" node looks up and measures the distance to the nearest geometry.

View attachment 149996

Because the swim tyre also has a closed surface at the bottom, problems could occur (the "Ray Cast Geometry" node could "see" the wrong geometry).
Since I wanted to create the floaty hoop in "Marvelous Designer" the quickest way was to split the hoop into top and bottom parts and let "Ray Cast Geometry" node look for the upper part only (Marvelous Designer offers the possibility to export the objects unwelded).

Just briefly on the Marvelous Designer part: I made a very simple pattern for the float. Then I sewed it together and pumped it up.

View attachment 149988

Although Marvelous Designer can record pumping up I did the inflation step by step and exported the intermediate steps as obj. This somewhat more cumbersome method had the following purpose. Firstly, it gives you precise control over the individual pump-up steps. Secondly, Marvelous Designer does not behave in the same way when recording an animation as it does when simply simulating it.

However, in the end I had 9 individual objects of the inflating floating hoop.

In Layout I used a method that may not be familiar to everyone.
Instead of making endomorphs out of the individual objects and using Morph Mixer, I used Morphing.

View attachment 149989

This allows you to morph an object into another object. And the second object into a next one and so on (all objects must have the same number and order of vertices).
And the advantage is: this whole morph chain can be controlled with a single envelope.

Let's get one thing straight: Simplified, you could also morph the flat object directly into the pumped-up object. But that would not be the same. The inflation does not take place linearly. With several intermediate stages, the animation becomes more organic.

This is what the envelope of the morph looks like. 100 means that the first morph is finished, 200 means that the second morph is finished, and so on.

View attachment 149990

Bonus material: another method would be to save the animation as mdd. And then animate the play back speed step by step. A negative speed ensures that the floating tyre sinks again slightly after each pumping.

View attachment 149991

For budget reasons, the same genoma rig also had to play the pumping guy (you only see the feet of the first one anyway). So it was scaled down and inserted into the original animation using split screen.

Most of the time it took to convert the animation into an animated gif (until the file was small enough to be uploaded to the forum). ;)

What is still missing is a rendered image, until now we have only seen OpenGL images.

View attachment 149992

View attachment 149993


Maybe this will be of use to someone.

ciao
Thomas


Cool and funny ideas there Thomas(y)
 

lardbros

Not so newbie member
Love seeing quite a tricky setup explained so nicely and so complete.
Great result, and a brilliant way to mix software's to create a great end result. :)

Makes me wonder if you could have used a texture to stop the raycast, but probably not, your method seems sensible.

Thanks for sharing!
 
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