Insane Campfire ...

Gungho3D

A.K.A "The Silver Fox"

Insane campfire, 4K render res, reasonable render times (daytime anim = less than 6.5 mins per frame / night time anim = less than 9 mins per frame)

Emphasis is these are test scenes/renders ...

PS night time scene (and surrounds) is completely lit by the flames and nothing else - I was expecting more of a variation of lighting, a flicker on the rocks/ground/tree
 

prometheus

REBORN
I like the night time fire.

as for variation of lighting, can´t recall exactly how it was with TFD since I do not use it or have it, if it´s only a firelight that lights the scene, and in such case not very physical correct,and you would have to fake it with putting noise envelopes on the firelight.

Otherwise I would think the shader as in Emission shading part, should illuminate the scene, and in such case the variation should occur in the nearby environment, which it seemingly doesn´t.

so, try that, either on the firelight with noise fractals in envelope, or the actual emission being strong enough and react emitt variance lighting on to the environment.

In these samples there are no additional firelight and it´s the black body heat and emission settings that affects the environment as seen on the ground to be lit up..not lightwave, but the principles should be the same and hopefully working in TFD.

Perhaps just boosting upp the emission settings, or some other setting you missed?

 

Axis3d

Lightwave User Since 1990
I like the night time fire.

as for variation of lighting, can´t recall exactly how it was with TFD since I do not use it or have it, if it´s only a firelight that lights the scene, and in such case not very physical correct,and you would have to fake it with putting noise envelopes on the firelight.

Otherwise I would think the shader as in Emission shading part, should illuminate the scene, and in such case the variation should occur in the nearby environment, which it seemingly doesn´t.

so, try that, either on the firelight with noise fractals in envelope, or the actual emission being strong enough and react emitt variance lighting on to the environment.

In these samples there are no additional firelight and it´s the black body heat and emission settings that affects the environment as seen on the ground to be lit up..not lightwave, but the principles should be the same and hopefully working in TFD.

Perhaps just boosting upp the emission settings, or some other setting you missed?

That's a neat test. But the scale of the smoke, especially, makes the shot look small. But for a quick test, that's pretty cool.
 

prometheus

REBORN
That's a neat test. But the scale of the smoke, especially, makes the shot look small. But for a quick test, that's pretty cool.

Never mind my test per say, I didn´t have much time to work on it more for proper explosion time behavior or set up the shot, had other things to do but may revisit again.
just there to showcase the illumination from the temperature and black body, that causes flickering variation on the enviroment, as that was something the Gungho3D found odd not showing up in the fire sequence.

as for explosion..You also have this one, but would need more resolution and vorticy and a truck and a gas station as environment of course, and perhaps some movement..
Sorry for the none LW posts, I am however discussing fire and smoke and related without any restriction to fanboy software.

 

Gungho3D

A.K.A "The Silver Fox"
I like the night time fire.

as for variation of lighting, can´t recall exactly how it was with TFD since I do not use it or have it, if it´s only a firelight that lights the scene, and in such case not very physical correct,and you would have to fake it with putting noise envelopes on the firelight.

Otherwise I would think the shader as in Emission shading part, should illuminate the scene, and in such case the variation should occur in the nearby environment, which it seemingly doesn´t.

so, try that, either on the firelight with noise fractals in envelope, or the actual emission being strong enough and react emitt variance lighting on to the environment.

In these samples there are no additional firelight and it´s the black body heat and emission settings that affects the environment as seen on the ground to be lit up..not lightwave, but the principles should be the same and hopefully working in TFD.

Perhaps just boosting upp the emission settings, or some other setting you missed?

Thanks for the feedback/review. Both the daytime and nighttime fires run off the same data, without any changes in LW apart from the night time added model.

I like you example tanker explosion, the first one: yes it definitely casts illumination. Plus, there is a "violence" to the explosion, it has spread out with great speed like I expect a real-world explosion would - I would hate to be near that tanker in real life ...

Emission settings - on the LW side I've been running on raw data alone, just what comes in from TFD, minus Octane's Volume Ramp ... it's minus Octane's Volume Ramp up until now because I can see the theory, I've just not been able to get it to work using TFD data.

It really is "the school of a thousand renders," although in this case I've been taking my time, just enjoying the process of learning something new.


That's a neat test. But the scale of the smoke, especially, makes the shot look small. But for a quick test, that's pretty cool.
Hey Axis3D - not sure which of the animations you were commenting on. In case it was mine, yes the setting is pretty small - there are 4 "logs" stacked on top of each other, I think they're just under half a meter in length. Like I mentioned earlier I was trying to create something to scale, but I'm not sure it's there yet
 

Axis3d

Lightwave User Since 1990
No, I was commenting on the example made by prometheus. But as he said, he was doing something quick and not concerned with the details of the scene.
 

adrian

Audere-Est-Facere
But your fires are really good, day and night. Reminds me that I must get back to learning TFD considering I spent all that money buying it! I remember going through the excellent Kat Myers training but getting put off by the render times but I guess I need to improve my patience levels :) Anyway good work, looks very realistic to me. You could easily simulate the nighttime flicker from the fire with a noisy channel added to a light in the scene (although I'm sure you already know that).
 
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