How CPU intensive will NDI Bridge Be?

sel2006

New member
I am thinking about potentially purchasing a computer that has a sole purpose of transcoding NDI streams on NDI Bridge for a project I am about to do. If I want it to be able to handle 5 NDI streams from NDI full bandwidth to NDI HX in H.264 encoding, what is the minimum CPU specifications that I should purchase? I am about to do some testing of my own on other hardware to try and get an idea of how system intensive that would be, but I figured I should ask here to see if anyone has a good idea from previous experience with it.
 

Jarno

Post-LW Engineer
If you want to encode 5 streams to H.264 at the same time, the first consideration would be the choice of GPU. Make sure it is one that allows for that many. The typical GeForce card is limited to 3 streams.

---JvdL---
 

SBowie

'the write stuff'
Pity about the GeForce cards, hope that changes.

That said, and while I haven't tried it for a few weeks (insert more random caveats and disclaimers here), the last tests I did I could reliably send 5 or 6 continuous 1080p60 streams from my home office to my office at NewTek at reasonably good quality using my laptop's embedded Intel GPU to compress H.264. This was not maxing out my cpu, although it was pushing it ...
 

sel2006

New member
If you want to encode 5 streams to H.264 at the same time, the first consideration would be the choice of GPU. Make sure it is one that allows for that many. The typical GeForce card is limited to 3 streams.

---JvdL---
I am aware of NVENC support, but since I am a high school student trying to fit this within a high school broadcasting programs budget, this is sort of out of the question since the only cards that allow more are Quadro's. Also it's worth saying, if you didn't know already, the Quadro's that have this capability have the same amount and type of NVENC encoders just with an unlocked limit in the firmware, so it will only go so far.
 

sel2006

New member
Pity about the GeForce cards, hope that changes.

That said, and while I haven't tried it for a few weeks (insert more random caveats and disclaimers here), the last tests I did I could reliably send 5 or 6 continuous 1080p60 streams from my home office to my office at NewTek at reasonably good quality using my laptop's embedded Intel GPU to compress H.264. This was not maxing out my cpu, although it was pushing it ...
That is very useful, and promising, information! What laptop/CPU were you using to do this?
 

SBowie

'the write stuff'
That is very useful, and promising, information! What laptop/CPU were you using to do this?
It's an older i7, 16 Gigs of RAM - nothing special. (It does have that infernal arrangement where a GeForce card is downstream of the Intel GPU, but in that config Bridge is clever enough to prefer Intel, which bypasses the limit imposed on geForce cards).
 

sel2006

New member
Ok, just so I can have a little bit more of a reference for what we could get could you tell me how many cores and their clocks or the cpu model?
 

SBowie

'the write stuff'
Sure, no problem. I'm running an i7-8750H @ 2.20GHz . So hardly a fireball ... :)

Bear in mind, there are a LOT of variables in the mix, and key among those are the original video format and available bandwidth. Now this said, the quality setting ranges from something like 10% up to 400%, if memory serves - and if your requirements in terms of video quality are 'good enough for display on TV's in a high school', you could well find a very low setting quite adequate.
 

sel2006

New member
Sure, no problem. I'm running an i7-8750H @ 2.20GHz . So hardly a fireball ... :)

Bear in mind, there are a LOT of variables in the mix, and key among those are the original video format and available bandwidth. Now this said, the quality setting ranges from something like 10% up to 400%, if memory serves - and if your requirements in terms of video quality are 'good enough for display on TV's in a high school', you could well find a very low setting quite adequate.
Yeah, that's not a ton of power for what it is managing to do so that's definitely good to know! It's not exactly just a display in a high school since I would be attempting to use this with some cameras to transcode into VMix for our production, but still for the IHSAA tv platform we are limited to 720p 30 anyways. So bitrate and general quality definitely wouldn't need to be anything incredible.
 
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