Cloth / Fabric surface shaders in Lightwave

Hi All

Im needing to do some clothing on a human model in Lightwave.

I was wondering what approaches to surfacing and texturing give good results for something realistic and if anyone out there has had success with this.

Im not sure to go with a Principled BSDF surface with 100% roughness and flatness or to try a Standard shader with a custom fresnel type gradient in the diffuse channel.

Any thoughts or tips would be greatly appreciated

Scott
 
I don’t have a lot of experience with clothing materials and maybe there is someone else who has better tips.

Cloth_01.jpgCloth_03.jpgCloth_02.jpg

Anyway, here are a few suggestions:
I would definitely use the Principle BSDF material.
The most important thing (as with all PBR materials) are good textures. For cloth you need at least textures for albedo (color) and a normal map, Make sure that the normal map is set to linear color space (Image Editor). Roughness and specular textures are not necessary in most cases, as fabric often has uniform values for both. An exception would be leather, for example, which may have different reflective surfaces.
You can find some usable fabric texture sets on the internet.

Once you have assigned the textures you can try different values for roughness and specular (if you don't have textures for that). In general, I would start with low specular (1%) values and higher roughness values (30% up to 90%).

Some tips:
Use a good hdri to lit your scene (in my example I used only one environment light with a sperical hdri).

Because fine normal maps and high roughness values may need many reflection samples, it may be useful to use “Reflection Override Sampling” with higher values for the fabric material (Surface Editor > Shading Model tab).

Use a UV map for your garment. Make sure that these are laid out and scaled like real fabric pieces. So the fabric direction is right and nothing is distorted. Wrongly maped fabrics immediately look fake. I made my example with Marvelous Designer but it also works with other objects.

UVmap_01.jpg


If you use multiple textures it is useful to control the number of U and V tiles with a common scalar node. This allows you to scale all textures together. In my example i control the scalar node with the scaling of a null object (via channel follower).

UVtiles_scalar.jpg


ciao
Thomas
 
Last edited:

Tim Parsons

Active member
If you want to stick with BSDF as your material you will need to crank up the Sheen well above the 100 percent. Start at 1000 and don't be afraid of going considerably higher, even 4000 or 5000. I was using the old way of a Standard material with gradient on the diffuse until I discovered cranking up the Sheen.
 
Apologies for the slow response.

Thomas thanks so much for the details! And those renders look really good - its amazing what a difference the fabric weave texture makes.

Your suggestion of trying roughness values less than 100 has actually been a game changer for me, I had just assumed 100 would be the way to go but Im getting a better look at 90 actually.

Tim, Ive actually never really used that Sheen setting before... Ive tried using flatness thinking it would give me that result but sheen works like a charm to get that gradient look from the old standard surafce. Thanks!

When Ive got something decent looking I'll come back and post a render. It doesnt really help that the model Im using isnt very detailed (its a pilot model inside a jet so all the detailing always seems to go into the helmet and the body is just tubes for torso and arms).

Scott
 
If you want to stick with BSDF as your material you will need to crank up the Sheen well above the 100 percent. Start at 1000 and don't be afraid of going considerably higher, even 4000 or 5000. I was using the old way of a Standard material with gradient on the diffuse until I discovered cranking up the Sheen.
That "sheen" setting is really nice! I use it all the time for fabric materials.
 
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