CARS...CARS...CARS!

RPSchmidt

Member
Some very fine renders! I have really enjoyed seeing the work you have put into this visualization.. thank you for sharing!

If I may ask, are you using HDRI lighting, or are you using a different lighting option?

I would really like to see how the render looks using a 4 or 8k daytime urban HDRI... something with flatter, brighter light.
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
Some very fine renders! I have really enjoyed seeing the work you have put into this visualization.. thank you for sharing!

If I may ask, are you using HDRI lighting, or are you using a different lighting option?

I would really like to see how the render looks using a 4 or 8k daytime urban HDRI... something with flatter, brighter light.

hi RPSchmidt,

Such scenes are produced only after precise planning. So a lot of work and brainpower goes into it. (About 3.5 weeks so far ) Most of the work is not the typical work of a 3D artist, but the memory management so that everything fits into the VRAM of the graphics cards and can be calculated in one step. Hence the massive instancing (and the use of the instance ID function for the surfaces in the Octane surface editor) for just about everything in the scene.

As for the lighting. This is the daylight environment of Octane on June 1st at 6:30pm and a 360 degree panorama photo that only serves as a backplate. This does not affect the lighting mood. The lighting mood is determined solely by the parameters of the DL environment. On top of the rendering there is a LUT > Kodak 5218, which means that the material is rendered neutral in the center and can then be post-processed in any direction with the help of LUT or other interventions. Therefore. As far as color mastering is concerned, I can show the scene in every conceivable direction. But you have to choose one. So this is always a matter of taste.

snip LWGuru
 
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paulk

Member
I think a tutorial on how you manage to squeeze everything onto your cards' VRAM would be very useful.

I'm assuming the same techniques would work for rendering via CPU.
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
I think a tutorial on how you manage to squeeze everything onto your cards' VRAM would be very useful.

I'm assuming the same techniques would work for rendering via CPU.

Hi Paul,

btw The vehicles do not yet turn when overtaking and the brake lights and turn signals are still missing. but that will come in the next version. to be continued...

and yes the same technic works also for cpu.

the secret is that you instantiate everything you can and edit it with the help of the istance id. in addition you have to remove all polygons that the camera can't see for every 3d object you see. so you have to optimize the polygons of the objects and replace details as far as possible with bitmaps and normals instead of real geometry. here is an example of the tires of the vehicles. so no modeled profiles etc.pp it always depends on the individual object that you want to use. then there is the adjustment of the bitmaps. so only use power of 2 bitmaps and also only in the resolution that the camera then sees. all this saves memory and speeds up the scene when rendering and working in open gl.

snip LWGuru
 

RPSchmidt

Member
hi RPSchmidt,

Such scenes are produced only after precise planning. So a lot of work and brainpower goes into it. (About 3.5 weeks so far ) Most of the work is not the typical work of a 3D artist, but the memory management so that everything fits into the VRAM of the graphics cards and can be calculated in one step. Hence the massive instancing (and the use of the instance ID function for the surfaces in the Octane surface editor) for just about everything in the scene.

As for the lighting. This is the daylight environment of Octane on June 1st at 6:30pm and a 360 degree panorama photo that only serves as a backplate. This does not affect the lighting mood. The lighting mood is determined solely by the parameters of the DL environment. On top of the rendering there is a LUT > Kodak 5218, which means that the material is rendered neutral in the center and can then be post-processed in any direction with the help of LUT or other interventions. Therefore. As far as color mastering is concerned, I can show the scene in every conceivable direction. But you have to choose one. So this is always a matter of taste.

snip LWGuru

The lighting is good, it just seems a wee bit artificial.... but considering the Octane lighting environment is emulating late afternoon and the addition of a specific LUT, that may explain it.

It just seems like, with the angle, the hot spots aren't quite "hot" enough, if that makes sense.

In the first image, the car that is second from the corner, slightly ahead of another car in the frame seems like with its paint and the lighting, that the roof should have a few more blown out areas. When I look at the black lambo(? - not sure, not a car guy) in the far opposite lane, there are some very nice near-white blow out spots from the lighting.

Also, the white / off white van further back in the opposing lane doesn't really have much light blow out at all, which you would expect from a lighter-colored vehicle.

Maybe it's just because of the PBR setup for those vehicles.

The scene reminds me of a busy thoroughfare in Los Angeles, so I guess I just expected to see some brighter, flatter light.

I was just interested to see what the scene would look like if you used an HDRI for the lighting; what overall effect different HDRI lighting would have on the scene.
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
I was just interested to see what the scene would look like if you used an HDRI for the lighting; what overall effect different HDRI lighting would have on the scene.


Hi,

this is what the RAW rendering looks like when you render it with the same hdri i used for the background only.
as you can see. flat and centered material so you can grade it in any direction.
it is missing the direct sun from the DL environment of Octane though.

snip LWGuru
 

RPSchmidt

Member

Hi,

this is what the RAW rendering looks like when you render it with the same hdri i used for the background only.
as you can see. flat and centered material so you can grade it in any direction.
it is missing the direct sun from the DL environment of Octane though.

snip LWGuru

While the lighting in from this HDRI isn't as dynamic, it's a bit more realistic, i.e., this lighting looks like what I would expect from the sky, which looks like it has a good amount of cloud cover and not as much direct light.

Thank you for indulging me with this render!

So... perhaps I could ask for one more? :sneaky:

One of my absolute favorite HDRIs is Cape Hill from HDRI Haven. The lighting is beautiful, nice warm yellows and oranges, and the sky is beautiful as well.

Would you perhaps give it another try using the Cape Hill HDRI? Cape Hill from HDRI Haven

I would recommend the 8k or 16k, but I've gotten beautiful results with the 4k as well.

If you don't want to give it a try, I completely understand... I'm sure you have other things to do!
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member

RPSchmidt

Member

That is really beautiful.... really love that light, soft and strong at the same time. Thank you very much!

blinkie tinkie winkie! and the vehicles now turn slightly when changing lanes...

And they signal now? The signal lights look perfect. Very nice! Can't wait to see an animation with the signals!
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
And they signal now? The signal lights look perfect. Very nice! Can't wait to see an animation with the signals!

yes all vehicles that brake and/or change lanes in the lane now show this with brake lights and turn signals. it is currently rendering. i will show this tomorrow. the vehicles now also turn in the direction of travel in this change lane and no longer "slide" straight from one lane to the other.

snip LWGuru
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
Here is the next update from Spiral City.


You can see animated lights of the vehicles and that the vehicles that change lanes now turn correctly when they change lanes.

btw for all those who do not know.

WiP means work in progress. that means you can follow the process of creation. so.
these are not final animations but the single steps to get there.

we 3d artists also call this "preview".

note. if you want to donate me all your money, your wife, your house and your boat then you can do it here.
paypal.me/ReneFalkThomasius

snip LWGuru
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
make a car dirty. only the procedural nodes of Octane were used to add the dirt, for memory management reasons. This saves a lot of memory and renders faster than working with bitmaps. Furthermore, the integration into a shader based on the instance IDs of the instanced vehicles is easier to handle. (And changes are easier to make without e.g. creating new bitmaps or leaving the Octane Node Editor for that). The same principle can of course be used with LightWave's classic node editor when working with LightWave's own renderer.



snip LWGuru
 

LightWaveGuru

Active member
Here is the latest update of Spiral City.

In this version you can see the randomization of the traffic signs, the procedural dirtying of the older car types as well as a set extension in the form of some houses that have been added as single objects in addition to the ones produced in esri city engine. furthermore this time a rather flat not so contrasty faded lighting variant has been chosen. Please note the school bus going out of town! LOL :)

btw The windows of the peugot 404 must probably be remodeled because they are so low polygonal that they represent the refraction index and the reflection incorrectly.


snip LWGuru
 

wingzeta

Member
Thanks for sharing this scene development. It is really cool. I know you are budgeting every polygon, but each time I watch the scene versions, I spot the missing axles on the Camero. If there is any room in the budget, it would be worth putting a low poly axle, so the sillouette is what one would expect. If the camera angles were arials, it wouldn't matter, but on street level it shows up. Looking forward to the next one.
 

paulk

Member
Thanks for sharing this scene development. It is really cool. I know you are budgeting every polygon, but each time I watch the scene versions, I spot the missing axles on the Camero. If there is any room in the budget, it would be worth putting a low poly axle, so the sillouette is what one would expect. If the camera angles were arials, it wouldn't matter, but on street level it shows up. Looking forward to the next one.
I watched the latest video with your post in mind. I don't think ANY of the vehicles have axles. Or drivers or passengers, either.

It's amazing this is being done on x number of video cards with a lot less RAM than you'd think necessary.
 
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