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Thread: Subdivision Modeling Workshop

  1. #1

    Subdivision Modeling Workshop

    Let's make a workshop. You want to learn about subpatch modeling, you want to share tips? Have specific questions? Have a request for a tutorial? Want to share a tutorial? Post a model for examination? Anything.

    We'll start here.

    Take this model. It has about 100 layers or so of all the steps it took to create it.

    If you have any questions ask away.

    Maybe you have better ideas about how to do it. Maybe you can share those, with examples. Pretty much anything goes.





    "final" is with surfaces in case you want to play with textures or renders.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    Pixel and Poly Pusher JeffrySG's Avatar
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    You rock, Richard! Great idea!

  3. #3
    Hi Richard,

    Yes this is a great idea.

    I would like to model something on the very simple end of things using Sub-ds. That is, to try and capture the essence of this car in as simple a mesh as possible -just a bit noddy, without getting too cartoonish. Basically stick to the minimum.

    Maybe though this is just too unexciting. To me it represents the Ford consumer dream (stripped down) in the 1960's, having all the characteristics (chopped) of their bigger models. A deflated dream with a sour bonnet. Don't mean to be negative, just thought there is something slightly alarming about this model which also makes it endearing. Am attracted to the idea of minimalist but still representational form.

    Have some more references, can post.
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  4. #4
    Fórum áss clówn Hopper's Avatar
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    Actually yes. There is something that's just been burning a hole in my head for the past few weeks.

    Using SubD - putting holes in irregular surfaces (after the fact). Like anything from convex to concave surfaces. Irregular bends like the fender of a car, or uneven "wavy" surfaces. And not just round holes. Holes that may have a mix of both sharp and rounded corners.

    Obviously you can stencil/boolean etc, but that's just the start. The trick that gets me is how to accomplish these things without disturbing the geometry already around it.

    And yes, I know... the trick is that you should have planned ahead before, but sometimes it just strikes me to add random detail.

    I'm sure this won't make sense after I post it and read it again.
    Playing guitar is an endless process of running out of fingers.

  5. #5
    Fórum áss clówn Hopper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glendalough View Post
    Have some more references, can post.
    Wow .. I think that's the closest a car has ever become to being a cartoon without actually being one!
    Playing guitar is an endless process of running out of fingers.

  6. #6
    Valiant NewTeKnight Matt's Avatar
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    First tip that comes to mind:

    Plan your model. Even draw on paper where you plan to place cuts / edges etc. It can save a lot of time in the long run!
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Glendalough View Post
    Hi Richard,
    Maybe though this is just too unexciting. To me it represents the Ford consumer dream (stripped down) in the 1960's, having all the characteristics (chopped) of their bigger models. A deflated dream with a sour bonnet. Don't mean to be negative, just thought there is something slightly alarming about this model which also makes it endearing. Am attracted to the idea of minimalist but still representational form.

    Have some more references, can post.
    I love that car! It think it would be a gas to model. Please post any more references you have of it. Do you have a plan to get started with it? Do you need any help figuring out where to begin? Let us know. I think it is a great project and I love your take on it.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    First tip that comes to mind:

    Plan your model. Even draw on paper where you plan to place cuts / edges etc. It can save a lot of time in the long run!
    Good one.

  9. #9
    Fórum áss clówn Hopper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Plan your model. Even draw on paper where you plan to place cuts / edges etc. It can save a lot of time in the long run!
    Now that wouldn't be very Taron like now would it... You're assuming you have a plan. Since I do this for fun, lately I've been opening up modeler and simply "starting". Just anything... grab some shapes and see what comes out. It's very therapeutic. For me, reproducing something can be frustrating at times. It's still something everyone should learn, but lately..... it's been extend, stretch, rotate, collapse and spin!
    Playing guitar is an endless process of running out of fingers.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopper View Post
    Actually yes. There is something that's just been burning a hole in my head for the past few weeks.

    Using SubD - putting holes in irregular surfaces (after the fact). Like anything from convex to concave surfaces. Irregular bends like the fender of a car, or uneven "wavy" surfaces. And not just round holes. Holes that may have a mix of both sharp and rounded corners.

    Obviously you can stencil/boolean etc, but that's just the start. The trick that gets me is how to accomplish these things without disturbing the geometry already around it.

    And yes, I know... the trick is that you should have planned ahead before, but sometimes it just strikes me to add random detail.

    I'm sure this won't make sense after I post it and read it again.
    Well that is a very good question. And a very practical problem. It is going to depend of course on the situation. But this is where the more tools you have at your disposal the better. Not to mention a willingness to tweak by hand. And I would emphasize the latter the most.

    One tool that comes to mind is the point normal tool. If you add a bandsaw to the side of a disk, it is going to flatten it out on that spot. If you notice after you run the tool it leaves the points selected. Run point normal move on it to bring that back to the curve.

    But that might not be enough. Because you have disturbed the overall flow. I talk about the theory of this here.

    So now you have different distances affecting the way SubD will create the curves. So many times you have to compensate by moving things away around the area you edited, not even on it. Don't get too focused on the area you added detail. Remember that that detail effects the curves of the edges near it. You can adjust those curves even my adjusting points around those.

    Think of it like pulling the wrinkles out of a piece of fabric where you tug on the outside edges to smooth it out.

    Hope that makes sense.

    And remember sometimes a tool won't do it. I think it was da Vinci who said something to the effect of if an artist can draw a circle, he can draw anything. Well that means a lot more of course. A circle is the basis for all geometric forms, but that is another topic. Another way you can apply that is to be willing to look at something and tweak it by hand until you can see that the natural curve is back. Being able to make a perfect circle by hand on paper is a great exercise for this. Sometimes you can put a reference curve or sphere in the BG - which is a great technique by the way - but you don't always have that option.
    Last edited by Surrealist.; 05-08-2008 at 09:55 PM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffrySG View Post
    You rock, Richard! Great idea!

    Thanks Jeff! And now we have a link to your tutorials which I wanted to put here.

  12. #12
    Lava Lamp Technician 3D Kiwi's Avatar
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    Some referance for your angle box

    http://www.the-blueprints.com/index.php?search/

  13. #13
    Cool.

    On that site I also found this tutorial for setting up your Backdrop.

    This is handy as it is a question that comes up from time to time and there are some good tips in the tutorial too.

  14. #14
    Pixel and Poly Pusher JeffrySG's Avatar
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    ^cool... and it's even a LW tutorial!

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopper View Post
    Wow .. I think that's the closest a car has ever become to being a cartoon without actually being one!
    Yeah, when I first saw these wasn't really sure what was going on!
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