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Thread: lines of resolution to pixels

  1. #1

    lines of resolution to pixels

    Hi,

    I've got a few curious questions I've been thinking about; if anyone can help answer them I would greatly appreciate it.

    I know that cameras are rated for image quality in lines of resolution but that digitized NTSC footage is simply a discreet grid of 720 by 486/480 pixels. How would the digitized file compare in quality if it was fed a direct signal from say, an 800 line camera, as opposed to a 500 or so line taped recording (i.e., Beta SP or DVCAM) of the same thing? Would there be any perceptible difference (mechanically or physically) between the two? Conversely, on output, how many lines is the Toaster outputting?

    We're in the process of intergrating the T[2] into our linear suite and trying to determine the best way to capture in order to get the highest quality image in and out.

    Regards,

    Joel Slack
    Media Department, New Life Christian Fellowship

  2. #2
    The toaster brings the video in uncompressed. So really the quality of the signal recorded (assuming you're recording to RTV) is going to be exactly the quality of the signal you put into it. If you can record direct from the cameras you'll get previously unbelievable sharpness.

  3. #3
    Toaster Oven
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    I would add that lines of resolution are used to discribe various video formats.
    For example, VHS is about 250 lines, Broadcast TV is 330 lines, SVHS 400, miniDV abt 500 +? and so on.
    Thus, if you input or output using a composite connection (RCA/BNC) you are looking at somthing in the 250 line range.
    If you use SVHS, you are talking 400 lines. Component would be even better.
    All of this assumes you are recording to a compatible format. If you output to a VHS tape there should be no improvement by using an SVHS (y/c) cable as you will still be recording at the 250 line resolution.
    Allthough one may argue that the signal would stay higher until the last possible moment, I do not think it really matters in the end.
    If you are capturing video from a camera, use the best "format" or signal that you can. Generally for live switching most people use a composite signal or a y/c signal as all other formats cannot support a long cable or are to expensive.
    Bottom line is when toasting with an rtv (uncompressed) file, what you put in is what you will put out!

  4. #4
    It's ALL about the light Paul Lara's Avatar
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    Originally posted by wvp
    I If you output to a VHS tape there should be no improvement by using an SVHS (y/c) cable as you will still be recording at the 250 line resolution.
    Well, a large factor in this solution is the hardware you're sending the stream to. I used a Panasonic S-VHS recorder, which had signal quality focused on the Y/C inputs, but they probably skimped a bit on the composite ins, because even when recording VHS, there was a noticeable difference in quality.

    Test your own gear to see what gives the best reproduction.

    Bottom line is when toasting with an rtv (uncompressed) file, what you put in is what you will put out!
    That's one of the nicest things about Video Toaster...it makes uncompressed editing affordable!
    Don't stream it - TriCast it!

  5. #5
    The lines of resolution is only indirectly influenced by the type of connector, i.e., RCA, Y/C, BNC, etc. The limitation of VHS is the result of the limited recording bandwidth to the VHS tape: it makes no difference whether the input comes from RCA, Y/C, or component, all the signals have their lines of resolution reduced to fit the VHS format. The same is true for SVHS or other forms of Y/C. It is the tape recording format that has the increased bandwidth, not the type of connecting cable.

    John

  6. #6
    Thanks to everyone for the replies.

    Regards,

    Joel Slack
    Media Department, New Life Christian Fellowship

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