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Thread: Another basic, basic question

  1. #1
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    Another basic, basic question

    OK, I've been going through the VT manual piece by piece.

    For the life of me, I still can't determine how I record my animations. (I have lots of work from my stand-alone Aura that I've moved over to the new computer with VT.)

    It doesn't need editing it, it's just the way I want it. I just need to add sound effects and I see roughly how to do that in ToasterEdit. It's enough like Premiere, I think I can get my project together.

    Then, I want to put it on a video tape, full screen and send it to my grandson for his birthday.

    In Premiere, I just went "Print to Video" and it would render for a thousand hours and then voila! It would play full screen onto my television set and I would record it with the VCR to a video tape.

    Do I have to use the DVD Recorder or the Switcher? What is the process? I don't think I can do it from ToasterEdit and the Toaster Vision because I can't the ToasterVision screen to be full screen without the menu bar showing.

    I'm painfully aware that I must sound really dense, but I don't see how to do it.

    I am overamped with going through the manual to try to find where it says, "Now to record you masterpiece onto a video tape, you need to do the following." I think the manual writers assume the reader knows more than this one does.

    Sierra
    Sierra Rose

    sierrandipity.com

  2. #2
    VT5 USER Rich Deustachio's Avatar
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    If you have the SX-8 just send your video/audio output from that to your recorder, press record and then hit play from TEd. If you don't have the SX-8 use the output cables, Video and Audio, send that to your recorder and start recording and press play in TEd. No rendering needed. In both cases open up your switcher panel and set your program to TEd.

  3. #3
    VT[5] SpeedEdit Pilot Jim Capillo's Avatar
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    and don't forget to open up the audio mixer and turn up the outputs......
    Jim Capillo

    CW Television Productions
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  4. #4
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    Thanks you guys. I could hug you! The path is open for Grandma power! Sierra
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  5. #5
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    Well Grandma power is idling at the crossroads.

    If we want to use the coaxial input on the VCR, it seems we need to use the grey composite cable from the VT. Is that correct? If that is the case, then I guess we need an adapter to make it work, since the 2 concentric rings on the end of all the VT cables prevent our being able to plug into standard VCR ports.

    If we wanted to (or had to) do S-Video, would we need an adapter to connect the red and green cables at one end and an S-Video male plug at the other end?

    Thanks --Sierra
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  6. #6
    Grizzled Veteran jcupp's Avatar
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    The coax input on your VCR is probably for an antenna connection. On most consumer type VCRs the Video In is a yellow RCA connector. Radio Shack or the like can supply you with the proper BNC to RCA adapter.

    To use the S-video output you would indeed need an adapter from the red and green BNC cables to the standard 4 pin mini-DIN connector. These are a little harder to find, try your VT dealer first, or a local electronics parts house. NewTek may sell these also.
    -Jeff


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  7. #7
    The first thing I did when I got my VT (just to test it out etc) was plug in our old vcr and play a movie through it. I don't have an SX-8 so I used the breakout cable that's included. The wiring is all the same to go from RCA cables to BNC (what the VT cable uses). Just stop by radio shack and ask for a converter from BNC male to RCA female, or if they don't have that, male/male and then an RCA female/female. Worked great. You might want to get a few of them if you have any consumer-end composite outputs, such as from a DVD player. Most of those will be RCA-style jacks too. Enjoy!

  8. #8
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    RCA vs S-Video

    Thanks Michael for your input. It is much appreciated. I will try anything to get my stuff out.

    My problem is this: the difference is so dramatic between RCA and S-Video that I am loathe to get into anymore RCA anything. (RCA connections make my work so fuzzy, it turns to mush. You can't see the features on the characters' faces for example.) The s-video connection is soooooo much clearer!

    At least it was that way before we got the VT. What was the quality like with your movie? Of course video is different from line drawings. Video looks passably ok to me with the RCA connector.

    We called Customer Service, btw, and they are sending (supposedly) the adapters we need to get the s-video connected from the BNC cables. I say "supposedly" because the Customer Service person, who was extremely nice to us, didn't seem to understand what it was we were asking. I hope he got it right with the technician he kept talking to while we were on hold.

    I'll post our results in case anyone else needs to resolve this too.
    It's the least I can do for all the kind help I've received here.

    Sierra
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    sierrandipity.com

  9. #9
    It's ALL about the light Paul Lara's Avatar
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    Re: RCA vs S-Video

    Originally posted by sierra
    RCA connections make my work so fuzzy, it turns to mush. You can't see the features on the characters' faces for example. The s-video connection is soooooo much clearer!
    While able to enjoy uncompressed playback, which will boost your composite quality, it is quite true that Y/C is a dramatic improvement when there is fine detail, with sharp edges to that detail.

    Technically, what you're referring to is the the way the signal is being brought in. Composite is all the video in one hose, where Y/C sends the brightness and color in two discrete signals. This is superior because those radical edges are then more understandable electronically. In composite, the recording can 'confuse' the signal, causing colors to bleed or be mistaken for brightness data.

    S-video is the tape format itself, which can be recorded with either Y/C or composite signals.

    I hope this helps, Sierra!

    Paul
    Don't stream it - TriCast it!

  10. #10
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    Thanks, Paul. I appreciate your helpful explanation of the differences between Y/C and composite. From reading the manual, I found reference to COMPONENT which sounds like it's even better. Could you explain component? I get the idea that it's better but not sure what it is.

    When I say S-video connection, I am referring to an s-video connection cable. (At least that's what the stores call it.)

    We barely could find a VCR with s-video IN (we need to go IN, of course, from our computer). Lots of them have s-video OUT.

    I'm guessing that when our adapter gets here from NewTek, it will connect our BNC cables to the S-video cable and then on IN to our VCR. (This is probably obvious to everyone else, but I am still in computer kindergarten.)

    Many stores we checked with said they don't get any requests for VCR's with S-Video IN ports. Best Buy was one of these. We finally bought a demo model from Circuit City because it was the only one they had.

    I suppose people who are doing family videos find RCA fine.

    Still puzzling through all this....Sierra
    Sierra Rose

    sierrandipity.com

  11. #11
    Newbie Member johnnylandrover's Avatar
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    Component seperates the primary colors Red, Blue, green & also seperates the luma and chroma. So composite uses 1 line to send everything, Svideo uses 2 lines, 1 for brightness & 1 for color. & component uses 5 lines in a sense. 3 lines for red,blue & green, 1 for brightness & 1 for darkness (chroma/Luma).

    Johnny

  12. #12
    Registered User sierra's Avatar
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    Oh. Thanks. So do you have to have the break out box in order to get component? (It sounds like what I want to get.)
    Sierra
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  13. #13
    Newbie Member johnnylandrover's Avatar
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    You don't need a break out box since the T2 comes with component, S video, composite in/out standard.

  14. #14
    Grizzled Veteran jcupp's Avatar
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    Originally posted by johnnylandrover
    Component seperates the primary colors Red, Blue, green & also seperates the luma and chroma. So composite uses 1 line to send everything, Svideo uses 2 lines, 1 for brightness & 1 for color. & component uses 5 lines in a sense. 3 lines for red,blue & green, 1 for brightness & 1 for darkness (chroma/Luma).

    Johnny
    Actually componant seperates the video into Y, R - Y, & B - Y signals. This is Luminance or brightness, Red minus luminance, and Blue minus liminance. This is one of the strenghs of the VT as no lossy conversion into RGB is neccesary. Only three lines are used, the sync is carried with the luminance signal.

    Some computer monitors take Red, Geen, Blue, Hsync and Vsync signals using cables like the Toaster's 5 headed BNC cables.

    Just to clarify
    -Jeff


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  15. #15
    'the write stuff' SBowie's Avatar
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    Yup - I often wish the component cables weren't frequently distinguished with with red, green and blue colors, as waaaayyy too many people equate this usage with RGB, which it decidedly is not.
    --
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