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Thread: CMYK Support Requested for LightWave

  1. #1

    Lightwave Tec support, does it exist?

    I have emailed tec support about a cmyk output option for print in LW3D, and to this day there has been no reply. Maybe they do not exist. Not answering tec questions is the beginning of the end for any software package. First they do not answer questions, then they post bad upgrades, then late upgrades, then no upgrades, then death. I am worried.

  2. #2
    there is no native cmyk support in Lightwave.

    You should do it in post (PS?)

  3. #3
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    Speaking as part of the tech support team here in Europe, I can honestly say I've never received your question, but my answer would be the same as ByteHawk's.

    Since LightWave was intended as a package for screen resolutions, either film or broadcast, there are no settings for CMYK (or print resolution). To avoid gamut problems, and ensure that you have the widest possible range of colours for the conversion I would suggest that you save an HDR image to a package capable of dealing with it and converting to CMYK. I'm not sure that the combination is very likely, however...

    B
    Ben Vost - NewTek LightWave 3D development
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  4. #4
    Registered User wapangy's Avatar
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    Yea, I emailed NewTek about somethings last week, and have not gotten any answer. Usually they reply to me within 24 hours.

    Whats going on?

  5. #5
    Bee Vee. I went to the lightwave.com site, you know the one with the photos of the tec guys. Actually after not getting a reply I also tried cus. services also no response, and that’s terrible. Lightwave 3d has made a big error not supplying CMYK output because after producing those beautiful renders the colours get ‘messed up’ when you come to prepare for print, you have to control cols. before rendering or the post edit becomes heavy. It is crazy not to support CMYK because everything and I mean every commercial project will need some print element to it (you see the poster and the flyer before the movie). Does anyone know of a plug-in or neat fix that works? HDRI is not the solution because the main problem is colour change not DPI. I wrestled with an image for days to get the print to look like the onscreen image (this issue is more important than you realise – that’s why CMYK was left out).

  6. #6
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    I understand perfectly about CMYK since I worked editing magazines for about eight years! Unfortunately, the tools you can use to get the gamuts necessary for good rendering in LightWave aren't exactly compatible with LightWave's rendering method. Your only solution is to do as I used to and make sure to take test renders of areas you know are going to be tricky in CMYK - areas of blue and green mainly - and see what they look like. Lastly, don't just settle for Photoshop's conversion of RGB to CMYK as it stands. You can get a lot more vibrancy by fiddling with the channels both before and after you change modes.

    My point about using a floating point image as a starting point has nothing to do with image resolution, but everything to do with the gamut changes between RGB and CMYK colourspaces. Please also remember that people in video and film (to a lesser extent) have to worry about their colour ranges...

    B
    Ben Vost - NewTek LightWave 3D development
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  7. #7

    Smile NewTek Technical Support does exist

    I can assure you we do exist. There is only three of us in NewTek Technical Support for the entire world. We are always on the phones with the customers and get on the e-mails on a daily basis. If you would like to reach us right away, please call us at 210-341-8444. If you choose to send an e-mail, please send it to:

    [email protected]

    I come in early every morning to check e-mails and distribute them several times a day.

    John


    John Fletcher
    NewTek Technical Support Manager

  8. #8
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    *Cough!* When John says "for the entire world", he is obviously not saying that there are two people in Europe, myself and Jacques Madec, who also do tech support because that goes without saying...



    B
    Ben Vost - NewTek LightWave 3D development
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  9. #9
    I'm sure he meant everywhere else in the world that you guys don't cover. Also, since they're pretty swamped, I'm sure it feels like the whole world, or even the two neighboring planets...

  10. #10
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    Don't forget Yoshi in Japan either!

    B
    Ben Vost - NewTek LightWave 3D development
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  11. #11
    Bee Vee
    This is an engineering problem and solving it is the difference between an average piece of software and a great piece of software engineering. Doing odd workarounds is a bit like doing some strange yoga that you really don’t understand, in the end the colours in the image get dislocated. You cannot beat first class engineering solutions that solve real practical problems for users (this is a big oversight, print colours are always going to behave differently from rgb).

    What I would like to hear is something like:
    Yes this is a major problem but our engineers are so good that they will have a solution for you in the next update.
    Then I say:
    You guys are awesome!

    Thanks John, but truly tec support did not respond, neither did customer support. Now your comment about phoning is valid I have phoned before when I could not get an email response and the phone system did work, but I regard phoning as a last desperate cry for help, I am sure it is better for everyone if the email system works, even an acknowledgement that the problem is queued would help.

  12. #12
    LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    The fact of the matter is that if we had less recalcitrant printers, we would have moved to a stochastic hexachrome system many years ago and there would be far fewer problems with colours not adequately represented by the CMYK gamut. LightWave is a program for video and film primarily. To my knowledge none of the well-known 3D software packages - Cinema 4D, Maya, XSI, 3dsmax - provide output in CMYK directly because you would have to limit the number of colours you can render in. CMYK space *is* bigger than RGB, I know that, but the amount of unacceptable colours makes the range smaller than strict RGB.

    All the best,

    B
    Ben Vost - NewTek LightWave 3D development
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  13. #13
    Well, are you guys going to support CMYK or not?
    We are talking about an option here not limiting everything to CMYK (that would be madness). I am not a programmer but I can see that it won’t be a major engineering step to include a CMYK colour picker, nor would it be a major step to have a check box that limits the colours of imported images so you can see how the colours are going to change in CMYK. Further more lights may have a CMYK option, rendering can also have a CMYK option (or perhaps something much more thought out than my random thoughts on this). As to the other 3D packs, well we want to lead not follow. By including CMYK options and thinking about print output - which is a vital necessity – you will give Lightwave 3D an incredible edge over the competition, just think of the marketing potential. If I am working on large print projects that involve 3d (and many do) and there is a 3D pack that is print savvy then that’s the one.
    PS you may also want to consider DPI and LPI as an option for image size rendering as well (and I know Lightwave is a Film TV thing but think about the real world out there).

  14. #14
    do you really take the finished output from lightwave straight to the printers or do you do post processing / quark, photoshop etc... ?

    I use Lightwave proffesionally and mainly for print (and I muck around with animation in my free time), but have never had any problems with its RGB/HDR output. Nor have I noticed any real lack of features to this end.
    Last edited by Bytehawk; 04-11-2003 at 04:31 AM.

  15. #15
    Super Member Red_Oddity's Avatar
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    Not to mention, everything you do for print on a computer is pretty much always a bit off a guess as to how it really will look in the end, monitors, as we all know, are using a RGB aproximation aswell as the software...
    Print is always a bit of a problem, you just have to build up experience what RGB/CMYK profiles look like what with which printing facility...it's more a case of experiences than it has to anything with LW or anyother piece of software for that matter.

    Just store you monitor settings (best use a TFT LCD as these pretty much have the same colors and brightness/contrasts), color profiles, and make sure you log away a printed end result (aswell from you as from the print facility) with a backup of your projects.

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