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Thread: Making a readable animation demo disk

  1. #1
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
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    Question Making a readable animation demo disk

    Can anyone advise on making a disk of animation sequences as a rough for a potential client?

    What I am really after is something that I can be 100% sure he will be able to see on a bog standard PC.

    If it looks sharp and detailed, so much the better, I'm prepared to spend some money for software that will help.

    My impression at the moment is that the default installed codecs are pretty awful.

    All clues very gratefully received!

    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
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  2. #2
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    I've had really good experience using Adobe Premier for compressing video footage. Typically I'll render something out (mainly from AfterEffects as I'm still a n00b to Lightwave) with no compression, and then import the footage to Premier and run all the compression through that. Although I have read some really negative posts towards RealPlayer (I admit, I hate it too) I was able to get a very nice animation compressed with Cleaner. The quality was really good too.

  3. #3
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
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    So how did you present the result?

    Sorry, perhaps am not being clesr here - I was after suggestions for codecs or video disc formats...

    Chers,
    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

  4. #4
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    Sorry about that. Actually, all of the presentations I have done have been printed to tape. The only real "digital" presentation was streaming media. If you really want to get you client something that looks nice, I'd say get a brake out box and print it to tape. You don't have to worry about compression there.
    Here's what I use (actually an older version):

    http://www.pinnaclesys.com/ProductPa...83&Langue_ID=7

    When I render out of Premier, I normally use the Cinepak Codec with the quality set to 100% and I allow Premier to Recompress. The results are normally very good.

    Sorry I can't help more with a digital media solution.

  5. #5
    Been using Tmpegenc (Tsunami Mpeg Encoder ) free version. I plan to register for full DVD encoding support

    The free Tmpegenc version is better than the not so cheap commercial mpeg encoder I started with.

    http://www.tmpgenc.net/e_main.html takes you direct to the free download page, but read up on the rest, very good stuff.

    Output or convert your animations to Uncompressed AVI,
    then load into Tmpegenc.

    Also, Quicktime Pro is exellent for the price. The included Sorrenson codec is awesome. Most movie trailers for the web use Sorrenson. Quality looks like a mini DVD, very sharp, no artifacts.

  6. #6
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    Would you consider creating a presentation with Macromedia Flash Professional?

    I believe you can create a self-contained Flash projector for Mac or PC that plays Flash FLV video files. The Flash FLV video format uses Sorenson Spark compression. Their FLV Exporter works with a number of third-party products including QuickTime.

    Here's a link to their Website where you can get more information -- http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/...h_video_021104

  7. #7
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
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    Thanks Xid3d - that Codec sounds great. What's involved in playback?

    I'd like to allow for an end user who is as dumb as a rock!



    Is there a way of including the playback codec on the dsk, so the user doesn;t reuquire a brain to view?

    Cheers,
    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

  8. #8
    Any windows MCI compliant media player (incuded and part of the OS) will play Mpeg1. Doesn't have to be the new/latest Media 9 for instance, Mpeg has been around a while, and expect it to stay with the popularity of DVD (Mpeg2)

    TmpegEnc has easy presets that are optimum for most playback, then you can experiment with the bitrate settings as you get more used to it.

  9. #9
    Super Member Silkrooster's Avatar
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    Remember that TmpegEnc is not a codec. It is a program to convert from one format such as avi to mpeg. Most computers are able to play back mpeg1 files. I think it is Windows 98 and newer. As far as Mpeg 2 goes, TmpegEnc may or may not convert to that format with out the mpeg2 codec. However If it can convert to that format, your client would still have to own that codec in order to view the video.
    What you could do is go to www.divx.com and purchase a license to use their codec commercially.
    There may even be a license fee for the mpeg codecs as well. Do some checking before creating your video.

  10. #10
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the ideas guys, very much apreciated. Tsunami Mpeg Encoder is a neat program and easy to use.

    I've done a bit more digging and it seems that the end requiremnt is a disk that can be shoved into a DVD player for projection in a planetarium.

    So for now I probably need to work with Mini DVD, (until I get the new PC with DVD writer).

    I managed this once before, but now nero is completely defeating me, but I;ll get there.

    Cheers,
    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

  11. #11
    Originally posted by Silkrooster
    Remember that TmpegEnc is not a codec. It is a program to convert from one format such as avi to mpeg. Most computers are able to play back mpeg1 files. I think it is Windows 98 and newer. As far as Mpeg 2 goes, TmpegEnc may or may not convert to that format with out the mpeg2 codec. However If it can convert to that format, your client would still have to own that codec in order to view the video.
    What you could do is go to www.divx.com and purchase a license to use their codec commercially.
    There may even be a license fee for the mpeg codecs as well. Do some checking before creating your video.
    Sure, I agree, just keep in mind that TmpegEnc (Encoder) outputs to the lowest common denominator (decoder already included on all windows systems), making it easiest for the "bog standard" PC, or for that matter, any MAC with Quicktime will play them also without a hitch.

    Now that Starbase1 mentions the DVD playback requirement for projection in a planetarium, this raises the bar just a bit.
    - So, eventually, Starbase1 will have to test his clients system anyway, so what ever codecs he chooses will have to be installed and setup supervised to ensure all's well.

    I've gotten away with MPEG1 settings of 640X480 @ 2500kbit/sec and it plays on a PC DVD player. To get it to work at higer rez and on a DVD standalone deck will take some experimenting. If the Planitarium's DVD deck is VCD compatible, then you should be able to burn to a CD for about 30 minutes of DVD.

    I really doubt that Dvix will play back on a DVD deck

    ok back to work

  12. #12
    If you get Nero 6.0 it will take a lot of the guess-work out.

    Lately, many set-top DVD players will play Mpeg movies (mpeg 1 and 2) and WMV files.

    And a lot of firewire cards ship with a video application for free, so you can look there if you don't have one, or can use another.

    I use Nero 6 to burn any media CD/DVD, Ulead to capture DV, Premire 6 to edit/capture and that's it. And I have a Sony DV deck to capture from TV/Tivo.

    You can score a DVD burner for 80 bucks now: www.newegg.com, and most ship with decent software that does all you need.

    Use the free video codec translator mentioned above, it's great.
    Lamont G
    Artist Ubisoft Osaka/大阪

  13. #13
    Super Member Silkrooster's Avatar
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    The reason I mentioned DivX is because the original post asked about loading codecs on the clients system. If they were to use a set top DVD player, then mentioning codecs wouldn't even be an issue. Just use MPEG2 and burn a DVD disc, making sure that the disc is readable on the clients player though. As not all players can read the various formats available.

    Starbase1, one quick note, if you would like to create some kind of presentation and put it on DVD. Think about Microsoft Powerpoint, Macromedia's Director, Adobe Premier, Pinnacle Studio 9, Pinnacle Liquid Edition, Macromedia's Flash.
    Each of these programs have strenths and weaknesses, so check them out and see which fits in your budget. If you want to do things commercially then I recommend that you download the demo's, "kick the tires", then buy what you beleive will benefit you the most.

    Good Luck

  14. #14
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice silkrooster, much appreciated.

    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

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