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Thread: Bend a hammer?

  1. #1

    Bend a hammer?

    Hello and Happy New Year, folks. A question: can anyone suggest another way to apply a curving "bend" to an initially straight solid model part? I'm trying to follow the 3D Garage toot on modeling a hammer, and the tools being used are not very forgiving: Band Saw Pro, and then (on my own) Bend. Band Saw Pro is not very predictable, and Bend, when it halfway works, just pulls the tip of the bending section down in a straight line. And even then, it only seems to operate on the near half of the model, leaving the far surface twisted. Any suggestions?
    BC

  2. #2
    Super Member XswampyX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birck Cox View Post
    Hello and Happy New Year, folks. A question: can anyone suggest another way to apply a curving "bend" to an initially straight solid model part? I'm trying to follow the 3D Garage toot on modeling a hammer, and the tools being used are not very forgiving: Band Saw Pro, and then (on my own) Bend. Band Saw Pro is not very predictable, and Bend, when it halfway works, just pulls the tip of the bending section down in a straight line. And even then, it only seems to operate on the near half of the model, leaving the far surface twisted. Any suggestions?
    Use "right click" on the mouse after selecting bend and draw out the triangle to set your parameters. It's great!

  3. #3
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    Bend (and some of the other deformer tools) can be a little tricky to use. As XswampyX says, once you select Bend, right-drag a "range of influence" in one of the Modeler views (e.g. Top, Back, Right or whatever). The influence looks like a cone with a small and a large end where the small end will be minimum influence of the tool and the large end will be maximum influence. All geometry beyond the big end will have maximum influence applied.

    Then, in some OTHER view (e.g. if you dragged the influence in the Right view, use the Top or Back view), left-drag the Bend starting from where you want the center of influence to be. Drag slowly, and in a straight line as much as possible until you see how the influence affects the geometry, modify the influence cone or the point of left-dragging according to your needs.

    With Bend still selected, you can right-drag the ends of the "influence cone" to bend other parts of the same geometry. If you right-click in a "blank spot" on the Modeler interface, it will clear the existing influence and you can drag a new one.

    Here's a quick video showing a couple of basic Bend operations:

    MOV file: BendTool_Annotated.mov

    Good luck, and have fun!
    mTp

  4. #4
    In the worst case scenario you could set up bones and weight mapping and deform it via Layout then 'save transformed' to get your bent hammer out.

    I realise that by using the phrase 'get your bent hammer out' that I am I open to a lot of snickering and cheeky grins but I'm ready to bear that cross.

    Cheer,
    Revanto
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    Check out my friend's OLD Youtube tutorials
    Mix Mash's tutes

  5. #5
    Yo, MTP: It worked! Thanks to your detailed instructions, I managed to get the curved bend I associate with a typical clawhammer. And thanks for the video reference as well. But when I was working on the model, I was reading your instructions. BTW, that is the only video toot I have seen that actually lays out the steps of using the Cone of Influence properly. For the record, in order to get the curve I wanted, I had to use the Knife tool freehand to do what I can't get Band Saw Pro to do for love or money. But it worked. Thanks.
    Last edited by Birck Cox; 01-01-2019 at 07:11 AM.
    BC

  6. #6
    Thanks for the input, but I'm too new at this to know how to do anything at all in Layout, or with Bones or Weight Mapping. But thanks for bearing the cross of lowbrow humor.
    Last edited by Birck Cox; 01-01-2019 at 07:09 AM.
    BC

  7. #7
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    Glad it helped! Bend can create some really interesting shapes, especially starting with a quad mesh and subpatching.

    I use Band Saw Pro all the time and it's very valuable. The trick to BSP is that it works on "rings" of polygons which go around your geometric object. The way I use it is to get into Polygon selection mode and select two adjacent polygons on the ring that I want to split, then use right-arrow to complete the ring. If the right-arrow doesn't select the polygons I am targeting, BSP won't work the way I expect.

    I set up the Presets in BSP to the cuts that I use regularly, normally to sharpen edges when subpatching the object.

    Here's another short video showing how to use BSP to "indent" the edges of a cube so when it's subpatched the edges will be rounded. I know the same thing can be done using Radius and Radius Segments when creating the Box in the first place, but I think this is a good example of using BSP.

    MOV file: BandSawPro_SquareOffCube_Annotated.mov

    mTp

  8. #8
    Dear mTp, what is the source of those silent-but-effective tutorials? I have run into them before, but they reward study. Who does/did them?
    BC

  9. #9
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    Well, for the two little videos I posted in this thread, I just did a screen capture using Corel Screen Capture while I operated Modeler and then used Sony Vegas Pro to add in the orange annotations. I don't do many of them since the LW forum has a fairly small upload limitation (I think 5-6MB) so for a full-screen capture it has to be pretty short, and I've yet to work up a "pan-n-scan" approach to focus on portions of the interface to build a smaller footprint video (sounds like a lot of work!).

    RE: silent tutorials, for me the annotations are more valuable than a voice-over, since then I can pause the video on key menu selections with the annotations to try it myself in Modeler / Layout while reading the text. Once I've set up the basic Text Media object in Vegas and copied it to the clipboard, adding the annotation sequence is just paste a new instance, select the text to replace and type in the new annotation so it goes pretty quickly.

    Glad they were helpful!

    mTp

  10. #10
    Thanks. They are definitely helpful, and for the reasons you cited. They are at least as effective as narrated tutorials, and without the sometime (not always) yada-yada-yada. in a thick British accent.
    BC

  11. #11
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    I certainly don't mind voice-over tutorials, in whatever accent is comfortable for the author, although I do prefer concise tutorials without a lot of fluff.

    It's more a personal preference: whenever I hear voice recordings of myself, I sound like some sort of demented bear: rawr rawr RAWR rawr, rawr RAWR! I should have said the annotated videos work better for ME!

    mTp

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    use pictrix cbend

  13. #13

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  14. #14
    Hello, mTp, Erikals and gar26lw, I was*able to follow your demos and figure out my errors in trying to use the Bend and BSP tools. Enough to practice them a few times, so that I can at least claim familiarity by now. And I've become familiar enough with the other tools to work around a lot of my screwups. I'm not getting faster, but I'm moving along. Thanks for the help. I also, Erikals, realized how straightforward the Untangle tool is, thanks to your YouTube demos. Who knew? I guess the Dan Ablan tutorial was done when Untangle was still a-building. It's done now and it works fine.
    BC

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by MonroePoteet View Post
    I certainly don't mind voice-over tutorials, in whatever accent is comfortable for the author, although I do prefer concise tutorials without a lot of fluff.

    It's more a personal preference: whenever I hear voice recordings of myself, I sound like some sort of demented bear: rawr rawr RAWR rawr, rawr RAWR! I should have said the annotated videos work better for ME!

    mTp
    Dear mTp, Well, you are right. Every tutorial can be helpful. I overstated the issue. But the silent ones have the grace of getting right to the point and making the point in few words. 'Nuff said.
    BC

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