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Thread: NDI Scan Converter Issue

  1. #1
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    NDI Scan Converter Issue

    Hello everyone!

    I'm new to the Newtek forum and have been using the NDI Scan Converter for a few weeks now. I use the NDI Scan Converter on one computer to send my Skype/Zoom signal to another computer running WireCast (similar to Tricaster) for a radio station I'm a part of.

    However, on Monday, when I run the same settings and the same workflow, I'm getting a drastic delay in video and audio. It's very noticeable and even when it's "good", there's a slight, 1 second delay.

    It used to not give us these issues but all of a sudden. I've talked to our IT team and they've confirmed our networks are running fine. I also spoke with WireCast and they mentioned it may be a network issue, though our IT team says it's not. When I spoke with NewTek's support, they said to connect the computers via Ethernet but there are no more ports on either computer and we need them to connect to the internet.

    Has anyone else experienced this problem? What solutions may help in fixing the lag on our NDI Scan Converter?

  2. #2
    'the write stuff' SBowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesse_till View Post
    ... to send my Skype/Zoom signal to another computer running WireCast (similar to Tricaster)
    Well ...

    Quote Originally Posted by jesse_till View Post
    When I spoke with NewTek's support, they said to connect the computers via Ethernet but there are no more ports on either computer and we need them to connect to the internet.
    So you're using a wireless connection to transmit the NDI signal? Although this can work, there are lots of things that can impact wifi connectivity - so the suggestion to go 'hard-wired' is certainly a good one. It sounds to me like you could solve your problem for about $25 with a network switch located near your WireCast system. One ethernet cable between the latter and the switch, and everything else just connects to the switch.
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  3. #3
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    Awesome Sbowie!

    The question would be, if there both hard-lined in for internet, will adding the switch decrease the internet speed? Where should I connect the Ethernet Switch too?

  4. #4
    'the write stuff' SBowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesse_till View Post
    The question would be, if there both hard-lined in for internet, will adding the switch decrease the internet speed? Where should I connect the Ethernet Switch too?
    A typical switch will have 4 or more ports. One connects to your WAN (i.e., you internet connection). Another connects to the WireCast host system, and others connect to your upstream NDI sources.

    As to bandwidth, presumably your network is gigabit. Everything you do on it takes some part of that bandwidth. That said, you are very unlikely to saturate the network with an outgoing stream and a couple of NDI sources. You are more likely to run into limitations if you are using a network that is carrying a lot of traffic throughout your building for other purposes.

    p.s., if you ever intend to use Multicast, you will want to use a 'managed' switch. These aren't really much more expensive. I bought an 8 port one recently for about $30.
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