Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Help with network setup for Tricaster MINI/NDI cams

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    9

    Question Help with network setup for Tricaster MINI/NDI cams

    Hi,
    We have a mobile setup with a Tricaster Mini, Newtek PTZ cameras/Spark Connects, and a Skaarhoj PTZ Pro controller.
    The Skaarhoj controller needs the cameras to have consecutive static ip's to be able to discover them.

    So we need a way to set up something like a managed switch that will allow us to have static IP's on the cameras, and still have the ability to plug it in wherever we go to get internet access through dhcp for streaming from the Tricaster.
    Is this possible? Could it be done with two different VLANs, one for internet and one for static ip NDI, where the Tricaster has access to both?
    Any other tips? Is it possible to add a second usb ethernet adapter to the Tricaster?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    You want to avoid two networks unless you really need this configuration. If you aren't experienced network person, this can be more hassle than it is worth. There a few options to resolve the above.

    First, most DHCP servers can create IP reservations, so that specific devices will get a pre-assigned IP address. I'd use that, then you have one network that is DHCP for most everything, but the cameras will be configured as needed.

    The second option is to set the DHCP range of address it hands out to be smaller than 255 for a class C network (like hand out addresses from 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.200). Then use the rest of that space for your static address devices (like 192.168.0.201 up to 192.168.1.254). Then everything is part of the same class C network, part of it is DHCP and part is static.
    Last edited by kanep; 09-10-2018 at 09:08 AM.
    Kane Peterson
    Key Accounts Sales Engineer
    NewTek, Inc.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by kanep View Post
    You want to avoid two networks unless you really need this configuration. If you aren't experienced network person, this can be more hassle than it is worth. There a few options to resolve the above.

    First, most DHCP servers can create IP reservations, so that specific devices will get a pre-assigned IP address. I'd use that, then you have one network that is DHCP for most everything, but the cameras will be configured as needed.

    The second option is to set the DHCP range of address it hands out to be smaller than 255 for a class C network (like hand out addresses from 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.200). Then use the rest of that space for your static address devices (like 192.168.0.201 up to 192.168.1.254). Then everything is part of the same class C network, part of it is DHCP and part is static.
    Thanks for the reply.

    If I understand correctly, both these scenarios would require configuration of the router or dhcp server?
    This would make things quite impractical for a mobile setup. So there is no way to get around the issue of maintaining static IPs on cameras and controller, and keep the internet access plug and play for all the different venues?

    I guess we could just use sdi for video, and use ethernet for control only, but then you loose the advantage of the single cable camera connection.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    170
    My advice :

    Get your own router which would stay with your production kit, and connect the internet access from the building to the WAN port (set as DHCP) of your router.

    Static IP to all devices, including your TC on which you'd add your router private IP as gateway and DNS. Easiest way : Set the tricaster IP in your router DMZ, to avoid potential problems with NAT / port forwarding.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by doctorsunshine View Post
    My advice :

    Get your own router which would stay with your production kit, and connect the internet access from the building to the WAN port (set as DHCP) of your router.

    Static IP to all devices, including your TC on which you'd add your router private IP as gateway and DNS. Easiest way : Set the tricaster IP in your router DMZ, to avoid potential problems with NAT / port forwarding.
    This is what I do as well. On my mobile kit everything I setup on it's own LAN and I use the WAN port on the router to connect upstream to another network. Generally I can leave the router in DHCP for the WAN aside and typically it is plug-and-play. This setup also keeps most of my traffic off their network.
    Kane Peterson
    Key Accounts Sales Engineer
    NewTek, Inc.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    9
    Thanks for the replies, guys!

    Yes, a router might work. The only thing is, there are not many options for routers with POE+ for the Newtek PTZ cameras. It would be great to not having to deal with POE injectors or regular power supplies for the cameras.

  7. #7
    I have not found a router with PoE+. In my setup, I usually take a switch to connect everything too and connect it to a router which provides the DHCP, WiFi and WAN connection. Yes it is two pieces, but less than dealing with a bunch of PoE injectors.
    Kane Peterson
    Key Accounts Sales Engineer
    NewTek, Inc.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    9
    Could this work?
    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/produc...78-738374.html

    8 ports with poe. 120W total, 30W max each port.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •