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Thread: lw 2018 PBR and making an ocean

  1. #31
    John, indeed! with a flattener material (Material to Color and Color to Material) node for example, we could use tramittance shading from Dielectric Material as albedo of color attenuation in the color input of our custom-made ocean shader. Many other useful tools could be utilized so that we can add more refinement layers for realism over already physically based materials.

    Vonpietro, Thanks! Clouds near the circumsolar area get a lot of light and this contrast ratio contributes favorably with your reflections on the water. For daylight reference, perhaps you might want to try this sky:

    https://www.dutch360hdr.com/shop/product/df360-006/

    Mikael, like your test and also the foam effect. Thanks for your words. Much appreciated!



    Gerardo

  2. #32
    Registered User ianr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerardstrada View Post
    John, indeed! with a flattener material (Material to Color and Color to Material) node for example, we could use tramittance shading from Dielectric Material as albedo of color attenuation in the color input of our custom-made ocean shader. Many other useful tools could be utilized so that we can add more refinement layers for realism over already physically based materials.

    Vonpietro, Thanks! Clouds near the circumsolar area get a lot of light and this contrast ratio contributes favorably with your reflections on the water. For daylight reference, perhaps you might want to try this sky:

    https://www.dutch360hdr.com/shop/product/df360-006/

    Mikael, like your test and also the foam effect. Thanks for your words. Much appreciated!



    Gerardo
    P.M. Jarno the LW£DG Noder tell'em like it is, while your there a Fuzzy logic node for future A.i. stuff wouldn't go miss Gerrado.

  3. #33
    Electron wrangler jwiede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianr View Post
    P.M. Jarno the LW£DG Noder tell'em like it is
    At that point it really does feel like "telling your grandmother how to suck eggs" / "reminding them how to breathe", though -- it's so obvious, it feels kinda insulting (to them) to remind them we need it. At the same time, they didn't provide it already, so maybe we do need to tell them we need those capabilities (though that's a bit disturbing as well).
    John W.
    LW2015.3UB/2018.0.5 on MacPro(12C/24T/10.13.6),32GB RAM, NV 1080ti

  4. #34
    a shader/material flatener wouldn't really work for refraction well, i think it would produce exceptionally weird results.

  5. #35
    I also think developers know a material flattener is necessary. Though still don't use v2018, I shared some links to some posts with this and other ideas with a LWDG person but got no replay - maybe because all my images are hidden since not long ago the server domain has changed from .org to .cc. In any way, a fuzzy logic node sounds like an interesting idea too.

    At least in v2015, refraction is not a restriction to flatten a material property, but if indeed it is in v2018, the attenuation effect for an ocean shader might be achieved also with a SSS shading, so maybe Skin material could do the trick as well, but we need only the color component, not its shade - we could separate chroma from luminance with vector nodes, but hey! it's a material output, we can not connect it to any color, vector or scalar nodes ...if we'd just have a material flattener!
    It's just a sample case, but there's A LOT of other cases where a tool like that it is necessary for shading refinement. Just guessing no one is happy by getting generic results. Here is other simple example from another post:

    With new "Principled" material we can get specular like this:


    But let's say we want to go a bit further and reach more realism by simulating chrome specular, which has a reddish peak in the top of the highlights curve (like shown in the Disney paper where the Principled shader is based from).


    In v2015 we can easily colorize the specular shading with DP Curve, Gradient, etc:


    If we want to simulate an alloy with let's say steel (which has also uneven specular color response) we can get something like this with the same method:


    Principled shader offers us something like this:


    Colorizing shading results (an operation that doesn't break PBR rules) might be possible with a tool similar to Flatten Material, which converts a material result into color output. Then we could modify that with common LW nodes and use another tool to convert back to material again. This could be useful also for some 2.5D tasks (so common in VFX) that need to mess with shading properties separately. Other interesting parameter would be a function input to remodel a more accurate custom fresnel curve instead of using a generic Schlick's approximation.

    Guess that after the bugfix stage is overcome, some of these ideas might be taken into account.



    Gerardo

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