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Thread: Adaptive Sampling Info: Old And New

  1. #1
    Triglycerous Gluteous Dave Jerrard's Avatar
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    Adaptive Sampling Info: Old And New

    Wow. This forum looks very different from my last visit...

    Also, it seems that my adaptive sampling chart & info I posted sometime around my last visit has gone missing. So here it is again...


    Antialiasing changed drastically in 9.2, and then again in 11. Each time, this caused a lot of confusion about how it works and how to best use it. This is especially true if you're using Adaptive Sampling. Essentially there are now THREE ways to handle Antialiasing:

    • AA Level or Minimum Samples: This is a simple numeric value that represents the number of render samples per pixel. In 9.x and 10, this is labeled simply, "Antialiasing"; in LightWave 11, it's called, more correctly, "Minimum Samples". In both cases it's the same thing; the number of samples that will be rendered for each pixel on each Motion Blur Pass. This is much like the old method, that did single samples over multiple passes, but now, those samples are rendered at the same time. To keep things simple, I'll use the term "Minimum Samples" from now on.
    • Motion Blur Passes: Before 9.2, this was simply called Antialiasing, and was a dropdown of several preset values (and names; Low, Low Enhanced, Medium, etc.) to choose from. In 9.2, this was moved and renamed to Motion Blur Passes (or MBP), but still functions much like it did before, like the old method, where AA is done one pass at a time. (The Classic Camera still uses this method) This is primarily used for scenes that use PhotoReal Motion Blur and deformations, which can get extremely slow when there's a lot, and for volumetrics, which can't move & blur during a single pass render. As before, multiple Motion Blur Passes can be used for AA and DOF as well. Again, this is now a simple numeric value. This has not changed for LW 11.x.
      Note: This value frequently effectively works as a multiplier on render times; all the settings above this are done for each Motion Blur Pass. Thus a frame with a Minimum Samples of 3 might take 3 minutes to render but can easily take 9 minutes if Motion Blur Passes are also set to 3. All the samples done in the AA section are multiplied by the number of Motion Blur Passes.
      Rule of Thumb: Divide the Minimum and (in LW11.x) Maximum Samples by the number of Motion Blur Passes, and MULTIPLY the Adaptive Sampling Threshold by the MBP.
    • Adaptive Sampling: This checks the image for high contrast details where aliasing problems will be most noticeable, and then re-renders only those pixels with additional samples to clean them up. Before 9.2, this was generally an evil feature to be avoided as it would tend to miss fine details (if it wasn't rendered in the first pass, it never would be in later passes). In 9.2 and on, the image is rechecked on ever Adaptive Sampling Pass, to see which pixels still need work. If something was missed in the first pass, it's entirely likely that it will have been rendered in a later pass now. The number of passes was determined by the combination of Minimum Samples and the Threshold, and each Adaptive Sampling Pass would render twice as many samples per pixel as the previous pass, so the number of maximum samples doubled each time. As the threshold got smaller, the number of passes would increase and the number of samples could get VERY large. For example, on an image with a Minimum Samples of 1 and a threshold of 0.0001 (insanely low, but frequently used in LW11 examples), LW would render FOURTEEN Adaptive Sampling Passes, which would result in 16,384 (2^14 = 16384) samples per pixel! In 11.x, the number of Adaptive Sampling Passes is now manually determined by the user, and is no longer tied to either the Minimum Samples or the Adaptive Sampling Threshold.
    • Maximum Samples: This setting is new in LightWave 11, and serves as the upper limit on samples. This ONLY applies when Adaptive Sampling is used. Since 9.2, this value was determined internally, based on the AA level and the threshold. As the Adaptive Sampling Threshold got smaller, more Adaptive Sampling passes (AS Passes from now on) would be applied, and this would increase the maximum samples that would be calculated by larger and larger steps, doubling the number for each additional pass. With a Minimum Samples of 3 and a threshold of 0.03, this upper limit would be 48. Lowering that threshold to 0.02 would double that to 96 samples, and could easily double the render time. Now, in 11.x, you can dial in the maximum you want. Note that this doesn't mean LightWave 11 will always render that many – it will frequently finish an image before it reaches that maximum. If the image cleans up before hitting that maximum, the image is considered done and no further passes are done. Lw11 also now only renders a single sample per pixel per Adaptive Sampling Pass. This means you're going to see a lot more AS Passes being rendered, and the image is going to be checked for contrast for each & every one of those passes.


    These can all be combined to work together. You can have 50 AA samples AND 20 Motion Blur Passes if you want. This will result in 20 passes of 50 samples each, for an image that has 1000 samples per pixel. The AA samples are done for EACH Motion Blur Pass, so each additional pass adds another set of AA. This includes Adaptive Sampling, which is done at the end of each Motion Blur Pass.

    The important point to remember here is that Motion Blur Passes act as a MULTIPLIER for everything in the AA section above, so this will tend to multiply your render times by the number of passes you specify. If you must use multiple passes, you're going to want to reduce the sampling going on for each. A good rule of thumb for this is to;
    9.2 to 10.1: Multiply the Adaptive Sampling Threshold by the number of Motion Blur Passes, and just lower the Minimum Samples to 1 (or rarely 2).
    or
    11.0: Divide the Minimum and Maximum Samples by the number of Motion Blur Passes, and MULTIPLY the Adaptive Sampling Threshold by the MBP.
    The reason for changing the threshold is simple; each motion blur pass contributes only a fraction of the final image data. In the case of two passes, each pass only makes up one half of the data. when you figure in how the threshold works, that's effectively halved as well. A threshold of 0.5 is looking for pixels that are more than 50% different than their neighbors, but this is calculated on data that's only going to contribute half of the final image, so it's really working out that you have an effective threshold of 0.25 (half of the final image). By multiplying the threshold, you counter that effect. I'd still make sure it doesn't get any larger than 0.1 or 0.2 though. That adds minimal sampling for some cleanup but won't kill the farm.


    If you're only using Motion Blur Passes (MBP) or the Minimum Samples - no Adaptive Sampling - then it's pretty easy to figure out how AA works. More samples means better quality and more time. Say you want to do the old Classic Medium AA. Medium AA did 9 passes. You can set the AA level to 9 and get the same thing, but all rendered in a single pass. Or, you can leave the AA Level set to 1 and increase the MBP to 9. Using the Minimum Samples, all the AA is done at the same time, while MBP does it the old way, one sample pass at a time. These can also be combined. Setting both to 3 will give the same quality as well, doing three passes, with each pass doing 3 samples. Multiply those two values together, and you get 9 again.

    Render times will go up proportionately. An image that takes 4 minutes with Minimum Samples of 1 will take 8 minutes if set to 2, or 12 minutes if it's set to 3. The same holds true with MBP. There will be slight time differences, depending on the complexity of the scene. For each MBP, the geometry has to be updated. This included subdivision, deformations, shadow map calculations, etc. All those messages that flash by at the beginning of a render, have to be done at the beginning of each MBP. Obviously, the more passes you render, the more time has to be spent on these pre-render calculations, and that time can add up. If you only use a single pass and just use the AA level alone, then you minimize the time spent on moving geometry. This means that just using a higher Minimum Samples will tend to be slightly faster.

    Conversely, deformations, particularly those made through Bones, will take longer if you're using PhotoReal Blur in a single pass, and the greater the deformation, the longer it will take. Bone Deformations tend to be much faster with multiple motion blur passes. See the rule of thumb above.


    Adaptive Sampling is a whole new beast now. Every successive pass it does, it re-checks the image for pixels that are over the threshold amount. This means the number of pixels flagged for rendering on each pass can be different. Also, in LightWave 9.2 to 10.1, on each one of these Adaptive passes, the number of samples per pixel DOUBLES, starting with the same number you have the AA set to. The more passes it does, the higher the sampling done on the marked pixels. After a few passes, the sampling number can be quite high. In LW 11, each pass only adds a single sample per pixel, up to the maximum your specified in Maximum Samples.

    What is that threshold number? In old LightWaves, before L[6], this number was a value between 0 and 255 and defaulted at 16. The range is consistent with the color space of 24bit images - 8 bits per channel, or 256 levels per channel. When the first render pass was done, the image was analyzed. If the values of two adjacent pixels differed from one another by more than the threshold value, they were considered edges, and were then the only pixels that would take advantage of all future AA passes.

    Since L[6], the Threshold is defined in floating point values, where 0 is still black and white is 1 (formerly 255). Rendered pixels can actually have values outside of this range, but they're only useful in image formats that support higher dynamic ranges, like HDR, Cineon, etc.. To convert from the old method to the current, divide the old value by 256. To get the same threshold as the old 16, you would divide 16 by 256, which gives 0.0625. The default of 0.1 (in LightWave 9 & 10) is the equivalent of 25 in 8-bit levels. The default of 0.01 in LW 11 is the equivalent of 2.5 shades.

    A simple way to work with this is to just consider it a brightness percentage, because that's what it effectively works out to; 0 is black, 0.5 is gray, or 50%, and 1 is white, or 100%. Color spaces can modify the actual RGBA values, but on a threshold level those differences are negligible; you're usually dealing with variations of less than 5% (a threshold of 0.05), and a color space curve applied to that won't go sending it out of whack since the neighboring pixels will also be skewed similarly.

    Higher thresholds means fewer pixels will fall outside the range, so there will be less to render, and the the image will take less time. It also means that more errors can remain in the image - darker edges can still suffer aliasing, and low contrast grain can be left in the renders. Lower values will find more pixels outside the range, and result in longer render times, but higher quality. Threshold values of 0.04 to 0.005 are good, but it's a good idea to start with the large values & dial them down as needed. Anything lower than 0.005 starts dealing with values smaller than the RGB steps and will basically just start wasting time. Usually you shouldn't need to go lower than 0.01

    Since Adaptive Sampling checks the image after each render pass, the number of pixels that are outside the threshold can change. Some that were outside the range before may have been antialiased enough that they fall within it, while others might have been refined enough that they're more accurately outside of it. Things like photoreal motion blur, DOF, oversampling, area lights, radiosity or various surface blurring effects - anything that generates random noise or grain - can cause pixels to bounce in and out of the threshold a few times. This means that some details that were missed in the original render pass can be picked up and rendered properly in later adaptive passes. This is different from the previous method that only checked the first pass, which would only see what was actually rendered on that first pass. The would often miss details that fell between the pixels, and since only one check was ever made, anything that was missed would not be rendered. Thin diagonal lines would look like dashed lines in the old method, which is why I called that method "evil".

    If you use Adaptive Sampling with a higher Minimum, Samples, you can reduce the amount of work it has to do. Higher Minimum Samples values can generate cleaner images, with less noise for the adaptive passes to work on. This is especially important for 9.2 to 10.1, where each adaptive pass doubles the number of samples per pixel; the less it has to do on the later passes, the better. If it had to do the same number of pixels on every pass, each pass would take twice as long as the previous one. The idea is to generate an evenly dispersed, fine grainy noise in the first render pass, so the AS Passes have something fairly smooth that they can smooth out quicker. If the first pass is too coarse, then the Adaptive Samples will tend to glob up around the harsh points, and the image will look blobby.

    As the minimum Samples gets higher, LightWave 9 & 10 will do fewer Adaptive Sampling passes. This leads to a new quirk...

    Render time is not always proportional to the Minimum Samples level in LightWave 9.2 to 10.1

    In fact, some higher Minimum Samples values, when used with Adaptive Sampling, can actually take less time. The following chart shows how the Adaptive Sampling passes were handled prior in 9.2 to 10.1. All threshold values are rounded to four decimal places, which is all that LightWave will display in the Camera Panel. It can use smaller values than 0.0001, but these will be rounded and only be displayed as 0.0001 or 0.0, but they will still be remembered internally and will be able to add even more passes than shown in the chart. I wouldn't recommend using smaller values than 0.005, as the total number of samples can get extremely high.




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  2. #2
    Triglycerous Gluteous Dave Jerrard's Avatar
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    Code:
                           Adaptive Sampling Pass Thresholds
    
    AA Level           Number of Adaptive Sampling Passes
              none     1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8       9      10      11      12      13      14	
       1     0.9991  0.4998  0.25    0.125   0.0625  0.0313  0.0157  0.0079  0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               1       2       4       8       16      32      64      128     256     512    1024    2048    4096    8192    16384
       2     0.4998  0.25    0.125   0.0625  0.0313  0.0157  0.0079  0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               2       4       8       16      32      64      128     256     512    1024    2048    4096    8192    16384
       3     0.3333  0.1667  0.0834  0.0417  0.0209  0.0105  0.0053  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               3       6       12      24      48      96      192     384     768    1536    3072    6144    12288
       4     0.25    0.125   0.0625  0.0313  0.0157  0.0079  0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               4       8       16      32      64      128     256     512     1024    2048   4096    8192    16384
       5     0.2     0.1     0.05    0.025   0.0125  0.0063  0.0032  0.0016  0.0008  0.0005  0.0002  0.0001
               5       10      20      40      80      160     320     640     1280    2560   5120    10240
       6     0.1667  0.0834  0.0417  0.0209  0.0105  0.0053  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               6       12      24      48      96      192     384     768     1536    3072   6144    12288
       7     0.1429  0.0715  0.0358  0.0179  0.009   0.0045  0.0023  0.0012  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               7       14      28      56      112     224     448     896    1792    3584    7168    14336
       8     0.125   0.0625  0.0313  0.0157  0.0079  0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               8       16      32      64      128     256     512    1024    2048    4096    8192    16384
       9     0.1111  0.0556  0.0278  0.0139  0.007   0.0035  0.0018  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               9       18      36      72      144     288     576    1152    2304    4608    9216    18432
      10     0.1     0.05    0.025   0.0125  0.0063  0.0032  0.0016  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               10      20      40      80      160     320     640    1280    2560    5120    10240
      11     0.091   0.0455  0.0228  0.0114  0.0057  0.0029  0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               11      22      44      88      176     352     704    1408    2816    5632    11264
      12     0.0833  0.0417  0.0209  0.0105  0.0053  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               12      24      48      96      192     384     768    1536    3072    6144    12288
      13     0.077   0.0385  0.0193  0.0097  0.0049  0.0025  0.0013  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               13      26      52      104     208     416     832    1664    3328    6656    13312
      14     0.0715  0.0358  0.0179  0.009   0.0045  0.0023  0.0012  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               14      28      56      112     224     448     896    1792    3584    7168    14336
      15     0.0667  0.0334  0.0167  0.0084  0.0042  0.0021  0.0011  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               15      30      60      120     240     480     960    1920    3840    7680    15360
      16     0.0625  0.0313  0.0157  0.0079  0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               16      32      64      128     256     512    1024    2048    4096    8192    16384
      17     0.0589  0.0295  0.0148  0.0074  0.0037  0.0019  0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               17      34      68      136     272     544    1088    2176    4352    8704    17408
      18     0.0556  0.0278  0.0139  0.007   0.0035  0.0018  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               18      36      72      144     288     576    1152    2304    4608    9216    18432
      19     0.0527  0.0264  0.0132  0.0066  0.0033  0.0017  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               19      38      76      152     304     608    1216    2432    4864    9728    19456
      20     0.05    0.025   0.0125  0.0064  0.0032  0.0016  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               20      40      80      160     320     640    1280    2560    5120    10240
      21     0.0477  0.0239  0.012   0.006   0.003   0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               21      42      84      168     336     672    1344     2688    5376   10752
      22     0.0455  0.0228  0.0114  0.0057  0.0029  0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               22      44      88      176     352     704    1408    2816    5632    11264
      23     0.0435  0.0218  0.0109  0.0055  0.0028  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               23      46      92      184     368     736    1472    2944    5888    11776
      24     0.0417  0.0209  0.0105  0.0053  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               24      48      96      192     384     768    1536    3072    6144    12288
      25     0.04    0.02    0.01    0.005   0.0025  0.0013  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               25      50      100     200     400     800    1600    3200    6400    12800
      26     0.0385  0.0193  0.0097  0.0049  0.0025  0.0013  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               26      52      104     208     416     832    1664    3328    6656    13312
      27     0.0371  0.0186  0.0093  0.0047  0.0024  0.0012  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               27      54      108     216     432     864    1728    3456    6912    13824
      28     0.0358  0.0179  0.009   0.0045  0.0023  0.0012  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               28      56      112     224     448     896    1792    3584    7168    14336
      29     0.0345  0.0173  0.0087  0.0043  0.0022  0.0011  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               29      58      116     232     464     928    1856    3712    7424    14848
      30     0.0334  0.0167  0.0084  0.0042  0.0021  0.0011  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               30      60      120     240     480     960    1920    3840    7680    15360
      31     0.0323  0.0162  0.0081  0.0041  0.0021  0.0011  0.0006  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               31      62      124     248     496     992    1984    3968    9736    15872
      32     0.0313  0.0157  0.008   0.004   0.002   0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               32      64      128     256     512    1024    2048    4096    8192    16384
      33     0.0304  0.0152  0.0076  0.0038  0.0019  0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               33      66      132     264     528    1056    2112    4224    8448    16896
      34     0.0295  0.0148  0.0074  0.0037  0.0019  0.001   0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               34      68      136     272     544    1088    2176    4352    8704    17408
      35     0.0286  0.0143  0.0072  0.0036  0.0018  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               35      70      140     280     560    1120    2240    4480    8960    17920
      36     0.0278  0.014   0.007   0.0035  0.0018  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               36      72      144     288     576    1152    2304    4608    9216    18432
      37     0.0271  0.0136  0.0068  0.0034  0.0017  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               37      74      148     296     592    1184    2368    4736    9472    18944
      38     0.0264  0.0132  0.0066  0.0033  0.0017  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               38      76      152     304     608    1216    2432    4864    9728    19456
      39     0.0257  0.0129  0.0065  0.0033  0.0017  0.0009  0.0005  0.0003  0.0002  0.0001
               39      78      156     312     624    1248    2496    4992    9984    19968
      40     0.025   0.0125  0.0063  0.0032  0.0016  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               40      80      160     320     640    1280    2560    5120    10240
      41     0.0244  0.0122  0.0061  0.0031  0.0016  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               41      82      164     328     656    1312    2624    5248    10496
      42     0.0239  0.012   0.006   0.003   0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               42      84      168     336     672    1344    2688    5376    10752
      43     0.0233  0.0118  0.0059  0.003   0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               43      86      172     344     688    1376    2752    5504    11008
      44     0.0228  0.0114  0.0057  0.0029  0.0015  0.0008  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               44      88      176     352     704    1408    2816    5632    11264
      45     0.0223  0.0112  0.0056  0.0028  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               45      90      180     360     720    1440    2880    5760    11520
      46     0.0218  0.0109  0.0055  0.0028  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               46      92      184     368     736    1472    2944    5888    11776
      47     0.0213  0.0107  0.0054  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               47      94      188     376     752    1504    3008    6016    12032
      48     0.0209  0.0105  0.0053  0.0027  0.0014  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               48      96     192      384     768    1536    3072    6144    12288
      49     0.0205  0.0103  0.0052  0.0026  0.0013  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               49      98      196     392     784    1568    3136    6272    12544
      50     0.02    0.01    0.005   0.0025  0.0013  0.0007  0.0004  0.0002  0.0001
               50      100     200     400     800    1600    3200    6400    12800
    To keep this relatively clean I didn't put ranges in each column. Instead, each column lists the minimum threshold value for each step. The number under that is the maximum number of samples that number of passes will generate for that threshold. To find where your threshold value fits, locate the row that matches your Minimum Samples, then scan that row, looking for the first entry that matches, or is smaller than, your Threshold setting. For example, the red colored entries match a threshold of 0.03, while the green ones match a threshold of 0.01. Note that as the Minimum Samples value increases, fewer passes are added, and it's possible for there to be no Adaptive Sampling Passes done at all if the value is high enough. In the above chart, when the samples are set to 34 or higher, a Threshold setting of 0.03 or larger will not have any Adaptive Sampling applied. While it's not shown above, an Minimum Samples of 100 or more, even with a threshold of 0.01 will not get any additional sampling, though smaller thresholds will.

    As you can see by looking at the right side of the chart, one pass is dropped at increasingly larger intervals. At most intervals, the maximum samples also decreases for a given threshold. For example following the red values for a threshold of 0.03, you can see the maximum samples is 64 when the minimum is set to 1 or 2, but drops to 48 when the minimum is 3. In fact, the maximum amount for a threshold of 0.03 ranges from 34 to 66 samples.

    LightWave 11 no longer doubles the samples on each Adaptive Sampling Pass. It only does one sample per pixel for each pass, but does a lot more passes; one pass for each sample above the Minimum Samples. It also does a lot more edge detection - once per pass - since it still checks the image before each pass. With large images, this can add some time – about 6 minutes can be added to a 16k x 8k image. The number of Adaptive Sampling Passes it does is entirely up to the user; this is the Maximum Samples setting. As before, LW will render the initial pass using the Minimum Samples, and from there, it will render any AS passes it needs until it determines the image is done, or it has reached the maximum. This lets you add as many AS passes as you need to get the quality you want, with any threshold or Minimum Samples. The maximum number of samples is no longer defined by the threshold in any way, and you no longer have to double the samples or render time to bump up the quality a bit more.


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  3. #3
    pass:sword OFF's Avatar
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    This is a wonderful article, thank you!

  4. #4
    great stuff, thank you for sharing!
    Cheers
    Tomek
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  5. #5
    Carbon fibre dongle® 50one's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting, lots of useful info!

  6. #6
    Registered User
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    Very insightful! Thanks Dave.

  7. #7
    da what? daforum's Avatar
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    Thank you Dave. This is great reference

    Can you also explain how Oversampling works aswell?
    Montage Reel, Portfolio, PIN_01, Prime......«« go on, click on a link!

  8. #8
    da what? daforum's Avatar
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    EDIT: Double post so deleted!!
    Last edited by daforum; 02-04-2013 at 03:48 AM.
    Montage Reel, Portfolio, PIN_01, Prime......«« go on, click on a link!

  9. #9

  10. #10

  11. #11
    Super Member tburbage's Avatar
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    Funny, Dave, I came looking for your earlier posts just over the weekend. Thanks for re-posting.

    He who wishes you might consider videos or book update to the great "LightWave Applied" sections on shading and rendering including nodal now. :]

  12. #12
    What LW needs are some Presets that would at least give one a jumping off point to start out from. I've been racking my brain trying to come up with a good setting to get a project that has over 7000 frames [21 scenes] to render for a trade show video [1280 x 720 HD] for a client.

    BTW, are there any good renderfarm places that can do LW scenes and have or can use the plugins I'm using? I'm in the US.

  13. #13
    Garagefarm

  14. #14
    Super Member vncnt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesCurtis View Post
    What LW needs are some Presets that would at least give one a jumping off point to start out from.
    Do we have some script examples that demonstrate how to set render quality related parameters?
    A listbox and Load/Save button maybe.
    That could be used as a personale preset system.

  15. #15
    Poly abuser pablogrca1's Avatar
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    Thanks Dave!
    Words to live by. "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."
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