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Thread: Verdict on Windows Media Player 9?

  1. #1

    Question Verdict on Windows Media Player 9?

    Does it come with new codecs as well? If so, are these compatible with T[2]?

  2. #2
    Registered User Peter Palesh's Avatar
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    The new WMP 9 codecs are installed with WMP 9...however they are not Toaster friendly. Like using TMPGEnc to convert to MPEG, the rendered Toaster projects have to be converted to WMV9 outside the Toaster using the Window Media Encoder 9.

    There are two different codec packages / WMP's depending on the version of windows and media player the WMV9 videos will be played on.
    The codecs only work on Win98SE and up, and with Windows Media Player 7 and up.

    I have had a lot of success so far using the Windows Media Encoder 9 program converting uncompressed avi's to full screen WMV files...

    An uncompressed avi with a resolution of 720 x 480 can be converted to a WMV9 video with the same resolution @ 2Kbps and in most cases the file size is less than the same uncompressed avi converted to mpeg1 in TMPGEnc.

    The Windows Media Encoder series 9 is very intuitive and easy to use...and it's a free download.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/win...ad/default.asp[/URL]

    Anywho....that's my Two Cents... hope that answers your Q?
    PCPal Digital Media

  3. #3
    I haven't tried converting a lot of things, but I use as a player and it functions great on my Toaster system.
    Faraz Ahmed - Amitrace
    www.Amitrace.com

  4. #4
    Registered User Peter Palesh's Avatar
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    I haven't tried converting a lot of things, but I use as a player and it functions great on my Toaster system.

    Yes, Windows Media Player 9 works well on a Toaster system, just can't convert to WMV 9 from the Toaster.
    PCPal Digital Media

  5. #5
    Thanks ya'll!


  6. #6

    Thumbs down Draconian Liscensing

    We (as a company) are not using WMP9.

    The liscensing gives too much control to Microsoft. (In the company I work for's opinion)

    Did you realize that by agreeing to the EULA you are giving Microsoft the right to manage YOUR applications and to disable those deemed "undesirable" by Microsoft!

    Our chief engineer nearly sweared (big news for him) outloud when he read it.

    Sooooo, here we are...

    Just what I've seen.
    Jerry Beck II
    Engineer
    Vanguard Productions
    Columbus, Ohio
    "Get your facts first. Then you can distort them as much as you please." -- Mark Twain

  7. #7
    I take my VT with 2 lumps JReble's Avatar
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    If any of you thought you were having difficulties getting some codecs, media files, and/or digital capture devices working properly with all of the usual Windows scenarios, you ain't seen nothing yet.

    This is from an early release update to MS media player which was one of the earlier implementations of their Digital Rights Management Scheme:

    "* Digital Rights Management (Security). You agree that in order to protect the integrity of content and software protected by digital rights management ("Secure Content"), Microsoft may provide security related updates to the OS Components that will be automatically downloaded onto your computer. These security related updates may disable your ability to copy and/or play Secure Content and use other software on your computer. If we provide such a security update, we will use reasonable efforts to post notices on a web site explaining the update."


    And this is how MS puts it in Media Player 9 now that their lawyers have had lots of time to "massage" the language to try and avoid inciting anyone further. It doesn't change what is actually going on in the least. (Note that the term OS software is not limited to Windows itself) :

    "* Solely for the purpose of preventing unlicensed use of the applicable OS Software, the OS Components may install on your computer technological measures that are designed to prevent unlicensed use, and Microsoft may use this technology to confirm that you have a licensed copy of the OS Software. The update of these technological measures only occurs through the installation of these OS Components. The OS Components will not install on unlicensed copies of the OS Software. If you are not using a licensed copy of the OS Software, you are not allowed to install the OS Components or future OS Software updates.

    A list of revoked DRM Software is sent to your computer whenever you download a license for Secure Content from the Internet. You therefore agree that Microsoft may, in conjunction with such license, also download revocation lists onto your computer on behalf of Secure Content Owners. Secure Content Owners may also require you to upgrade some of the DRM components in the OS Components ("DRM Upgrades") before accessing their content. Third party DRM Software may do the same. If you decline the upgrade, you will not be able to access content that requires the DRM Upgrade; however, you will still be able to access unprotected content and Secure Content that does not require the upgrade."


    What's interesting to me is that many are interpreting this to mean that MS is only protecting it's operating system from unlicensed use and that's precisely what the MS layers want people to infer from their EULA. That is one of the goals, but the problem lies in the fact that the MS Digital Rights Management System is adding several new layers of permissions and revocations to media use within one's computer. Through the utilization of the DRM, many users have found legitimate media formats and individual media files that were previously on their system will not function due to excessive revocation lists that either identify files and/or codecs improperly.

    The end result is errors in attempting to utilize legitimately licensed media or codecs because they were erroneously or intentionally disabled or "revoked" until an appropriate upgrade is acquired in the form of a new license or updated file. (assuming one is actually attainable in the case of errors.) For example, if a codec maker has a new version of their codec, they can make it so the old one will not work until you update. Even if it's a free update, you will have to perform the update. That's if the DRM works flawlessly. If not, you end up with problems you will not be able to solve so easily because big brother will not have any idea how to solve the problem he created.

  8. #8

    WM9 = SPYWARE?

    Sounds like SPYWARE to me.

    I installed it on a couple of workstations. I hope I can remove it!

  9. #9

    HELP STREAMING ENCODER 9

    All is working (I think) Except when it asks for a video source I only get two choices: Blank or Screen Capture...

    What do I do?

    Jay

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