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Thread: Sub-D question

  1. #1

    Sub-D question

    I can get obsessive about my models in that I try and make them one continous mesh.

    Of course I often run into the problem when modeling machined objects where I have to switch back and forth from high density detail back to low.

    Sure I can spend hours tweaking things so I can get the object as a continous mesh, but I often just create seperate items for high density detail as it's much faster.

    Is there any reason I should avoid doing this?

  2. #2
    automator of tasks xchrisx's Avatar
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    I would say if it works, there isnt really disadvantage or reason you should stop. Often really high poly models have to be broken up into pieces or they are unmanageable. When I model dense meshes I basically do the same thing you do. I model the base low res model in one layer (or object) and then put all of the nurnies (detail) in other layers or objects. depending on how dense the mesh is, you might want to put the detail in different objects altogether and just combine them in layout, otherwise when you load modeler (since it shows all layers when you load an object) it can crash.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by zippitt View Post
    I can get obsessive about my models in that I try and make them one continuous mesh.

    Of course I often run into the problem when modeling machined objects where I have to switch back and forth from high density detail back to low.

    Sure I can spend hours tweaking things so I can get the object as a continuous mesh, but I often just create separate items for high density detail as it's much faster.

    Is there any reason I should avoid doing this?
    It depends on the situation of course. But there is no real hard fast rule. It is a good idea to model in separate pieces when that is how the object is likely built. It makes no sense to make a continuous object when in the real world it is not. This way you can avoid the step down process from the higher density to the low. But if in the real world is is one piece then try and model it as such because any seams would be unnatural in this case.

  4. #4
    Super Member Silkrooster's Avatar
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    It can also make a difference on how you want to animate it, assuming you will that is.
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