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Thread: Learning to draw...

  1. #1
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Learning to draw...

    So as the title implies I've been learning to draw lately, I've heard it's a pretty useful skill for 3d.

    Basically just some doodles/digital stuff I've been working on. I would love if you guys could throw out some tips/critiques to help me get better.

    I was also wondering if anyone could recommend a good drawing book. I've been reading over the book "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" it's been great so far but I'd like a few different books to pull and learn from.

    So anyways here's the stuff I've been working on, remember, still learning...

    Oh and by the way, those things floating in water are octoroks from The Legend of Zelda. Just so ya know.


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    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  2. #2
    How Old? Really? Aww Heck colkai's Avatar
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    Well you're doing better than me, my drawing still looks like the scribblings of a 3 year old.

    Though I guess if I had time to practice more often it'd be helpful. I did draw better when I was at school some >mumble< decades ago so I reckon keep at it and you'll move in leaps and bounds. You're at least on the right book, it has a great reputation.
    Too old to die young.

  3. #3
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    Etch

    How do you mean "drawing", more precisely? It's hardly pronounced in any artistic sense these days...

    -Drawing nudes in a wanky class full of middle-aged women trying to get laid is hardly it.

    -"Drawing on the Left side of the brain" is essentially a lot of literary crap...

    - Technique is all you've got or you don't need any?

    Look at the "Draftsmen" in History; beginning with the caves in Lascoux/lascaux

    http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

    Then the Ancient Greeks, the Egyptian Artisans etc. as in take a leisurely tour of art history because all the visual concepts are there.

    It isn't just about representing or perspective (which is just one kind of line breaking the foreground and clamping diagonals) drawing is the activity of lines.

    If you appreciate that it hardly matters whether you find them in a 3d app or a pencil and paper.

    The trouble with visual culture is that it's also entirely invisible, but as a species we are to visuals as dogs are to smells. As in 'lines' to me are a kind of pre-installed piece of human software, if that analogy is plausible?

    The Bezier Spline, for example

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_B?zier

    is the car designer's equivalent of the Naval Architect's beam; a system of placing weights on a metal beam to get the curve of a ship's hull right (before computers).

    But also there are other dimension to lines; the "Gustav" line, the "Gothic" line, or the "Front" like in War.

    -The "Arabesque", the "Egyptian" in aesthetics etc.

    All the lines in mathematics...

    Man, that's drawing and don't you just love it !!!! That's why people hand children pieces of paper and crayons.

    m

  4. #4
    Post-apocalyptic rakker16mm's Avatar
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    Mesh I think you had a typo in your URL.

    The Bezier Spline, for example
    was this the link you meant to post? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Bezier

  5. #5
    Post-apocalyptic rakker16mm's Avatar
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    Etch,

    I like the first and third sketches the best. The first has lots of promising observation to it and the third has a lot of humor. Books are great to get you started and I would definitely recommend haunting the local library. The most important thing is to keep at it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakker16mm View Post
    Mesh I think you had a typo in your URL.



    was this the link you meant to post? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Bezier
    Thanks rakker,

    -I'm pretty sure I'm the only Legally Blind person using LW, ( any others correct me please!)... yeah that's the one, thanks!

    -"Lines" are hard-wired into your visual cortex at a very early age. I can't see 'straight' lines or curves for that matter now because I don't have any active cells in the Macula anymore, which focuses detail.

    It's really hilarious because "straight" lines are an illusion anyway, they are simply an idea because they don't really exist in "nature" and when you lose the particularly human capacity of seeing them you can appreciate it more.

    I can see why Turtles didn't come up with Trigonometry; sophisticated
    eyesight allows for straight lines (absolute detail/cones ) which I'm pretty sure not many other animals have. Without being able to comprehend a straight line, how would you find the perfect circle?

    Drawing is not by any means an expression of optical vision, but an instinct closer to thought. I mean if you woke up dead somewhere in an Hospital what would be the first thing you looked for?

    The lines on the ceiling, the lines on the wall, then contours then yeah sure
    meshpig go have another Pinot Gris?

    m

  7. #7
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    at least on the stuff you have on paper, my first suggestion is to try and make longer, sweeping, definite strokes. Unless you're trying to make a fuzzy texture, I'd recommend against using short, fuzzy strokes.

    for the objects like the controller, axe, sword, anvil, etc, try blocking out the general shape first, in perspective, then fill in the details. I won't bother delving into how perspective works, as you should be able to easily find load of information on it on the internet. Even more organic shapes can be blocked out in such a manner, but I find doing so to be much more difficult.

    Also, are you drawing from reference? If not, I recommend you do.

    the only thing else I can say is... practice practice practice....^_^

  8. #8
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks for all the help guys, it's great.

    MeshPig: I think your definitely right, the single biggest jump I ever made in my ability to draw was to realize that I need to draw what I'm experiencing instead of what I think I'm seeing. Still working on it, but I'm getting there.

    Loki74: I've been thinking the same thing for a while, bigger more confident strokes would be better. When you say "block out then fill in the details" do you mean that I should just put down a quick look alike to what I'm drawing and then refine the lines, or draw the basic contour and then fill in the detail within the actual drawing?

    Thanks again for your guys input!
    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  9. #9
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    Lay out a blocky, basic version of ur shape... it's difficult to put complex shapes into perspective, but if you break it down into groups of simpler shapes, you'll prolly have an easier time giving it perspective & depth.

    Also (& ur 3D experience will help w/ this), don't think just about what's visible to the viewer--think about all of the precluded/obscured sides of the subject as well.

  10. #10
    I like the one on the right, it looks like what will happen to Q-bert after Global warming.

  11. #11
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Etch,
    I take two days of an bah, I see a great thread. Thanks for starting this.

    I would like to put a couple of basic drawing video links up about basic techniques. loki74 made some great points about sweeping strokes blocking the basics out first etc.

    meshpig,
    Hes bringing some good philosophical aspects in but has such a casual self effacing style, I basically enjoyed reading your posts.

    bye for now.
    Last edited by bluerider; 04-04-2008 at 05:44 PM.
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

  12. #12
    Wannabe wannabe Costanel's Avatar
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    For a good book, try "drawing for dummies" and the rest of the books of this author. It covers the basics and it'll get you up to speed fast.

    It all depends in what style you want to learn to draw, do you want to draw manga, realistic-copying, creating new things? There are a lot of books, all covering different styles. First think of what drawing tools you prefer, it can define your style.

    For good vid.tutorials, check the gnomom tutorials about drawing, or "the structure of man" video's(google it)

    I've got a lot of tutorials, books and materials here at home(never posting anything here though), so if you need advice for a certain style, just say so.

    btw: for programs on drawing(instead of paint) I'll recommend Painter/Gimp for realistic and Xara Xtreme(easy to learn and very fast!) for Vector drawings.

    Sorry, too busy to look up all the links...

  13. #13
    King of Trentonia trentonia's Avatar
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    You may also want to check out this site. It could give you some good ideas. Your sister might like it too. http://www.drawspace.com/
    With velocity expressed in furlongs per fortnight, it is essential that the basic application be applicable to the end item requirement.

  14. #14
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Costanel,
    Couldn't agree more, "drawing for dummies" is a great book.

    trentonia,
    Thanks for providing that link, excellent resource.
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

  15. #15
    Registered User Puguglybonehead's Avatar
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    Andrew Loomis produced some of the best books on drawing. Anybody can learn to draw well from them (well, except maybe boneheads like myself). "Figure Drawing For All It's Worth" is one of my favorites.

    The Bad News: All of Andrew Loomis's books are out of print now, no longer published.

    The Good News: They are from so long ago, that they are now in the Public Domain and can be freely downloaded from a number of online sources.

    like this one

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