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Thread: Learning to draw...

  1. #16
    Kamehameha Chameleon BigHache's Avatar
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    Being left-handed, I always draw on the right side of the brain.

    One thing I always notice with folks either learning to draw, or who do not frequently draw, they tend to apply a lot of pressure in all of their strokes. I tend to sketch very lightly, then go over darker and darker as needed. One thing that allows for is ease in changing as you go. I'm very non-committal when it comes to drawing.

    In its simplest definition, drawing/art is communication. Figuring out what you're trying to communicate may help you in arriving at your goal in your illustration.

  2. #17
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puguglybonehead View Post
    Andrew Loomis produced some of the best books on drawing. Anybody can learn to draw well from them (well, except maybe boneheads like myself). "Figure Drawing For All It's Worth" is one of my favorites.

    The Bad News: All of Andrew Loomis's books are out of print now, no longer published.

    The Good News: They are from so long ago, that they are now in the Public Domain and can be freely downloaded from a number of online sources.

    like this one
    Wow thanks, awesome link.
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

  3. #18
    How Old? Really? Aww Heck colkai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHache View Post
    One thing I always notice with folks either learning to draw, or who do not frequently draw, they tend to apply a lot of pressure in all of their strokes. I tend to sketch very lightly, then go over darker and darker as needed. One thing that allows for is ease in changing as you go. I'm very non-committal when it comes to drawing.
    Watched a program the other night about an autistic savant here in the UK who did a full backdrop of London, he did the same, hist first 'draft' was a seemingly random mass of squiggles from which he slowy but surely drew out the scene.

    Amazing to watch for any artist, regardless of his condition. My wife (like me a lefty, unlike me, an artist ), was captivated by it.
    Too old to die young.

  4. #19
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Wow all these resources you guys have pulled together are gonna be a huge help to me.

    I plan to sit down over the weekend and get some stuff done, I've definitely got my work cut out for me.
    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  5. #20
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    So after 6 months of intermintet practice and a semester of drawing I, I decided to post a few of the images I've been working on lately. Maybe my final in a couple of days when it's finished.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  6. #21
    Javis Jones: Night Crew geothefaust's Avatar
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    Nice Etch, great work there. Where did you take your class at, out of curiosity? Keep it up, you've already surpassed a number of artists I know that draw (myself included, lol).

    Puguglybonehead, I agree. Andrew Loomis' books are great. I was trudging through that very site some time ago, having them so easily at your fingertips is great. It really prompted me to purchase a number of his books so that I could have them on the go.

  7. #22
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Geo: Thanks for the compliment! I'm currently enrolled at Missouri State University.
    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  8. #23
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Hello Etch,
    Thanks for posting your drawing. Keep us up to date by posting more examples as the weeks pass.
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

  9. #24
    Javis Jones: Night Crew geothefaust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Etch View Post
    Geo: Thanks for the compliment! I'm currently enrolled at Missouri State University.
    Right on, well you're doing pretty darn well.
    Hope to see more of your work soon.

    PS- I love the Octoroks! Zelda rules...

  10. #25
    Hi Etch,
    Study the artwork of this site.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/articles/2..._good_art1.asp

  11. #26
    Foot in mouth wacom's Avatar
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    "Learning to draw..." Is a funny statement to me now, because I realize as an illustrator (I never said a good one!) that being an "artist" means a life long pursuit of the unattainable. What I'm trying to say is no matter what your level, you should always be "learning to draw" in a sense, or you're not pushing yourself.

    Here are my 2cents...

    Try to think in volumes and when that fails...shapes. Think of lines as a farce that you have to live with that try and describe shapes and volumes. Try to think in terms of "constructive" drawing while being keen to observe. DO NOT become a camera- experience the subject and use knowledge of what things are to aide you.

    I say these things because I was taught how to "draw" in school in a very de-constructive way. I became fairly good at copying what I was looking at- but I didn't realize until later, when I needed to create things out of my head for concepts etc. that I had no understanding of what I was seeing.

    That being said, try as MANY different forms of "drawing" as you can. Stick with the one that interests you most, or has the potential to get you to your goals quickly, but always re-visit the ones you thought were useless or too hard- you'd be surprised at what things "click" after you gain more experience and you've discovered a new need for what once you thought was meaningless. The most important thing is to observe and draw as much as you can- regardless of what the subject is. There is no correct "way" only your final image!

    I find that the Vilppu method of seeing and working is a nice balance of current techniques and renascences knowledge. There are many others who have a similar approach though- so search around for one that fits your mentality and experience level...

    I'd also implore you to try and "paint" things, using nothing more that a loose background sketch to start and build on, to help you think in terms of light and shade, volume an shapes. In the olden days (like 10 years ago) this was kind of unattainable for the average poor artist...but with a cheap pen tablet and gimp/ps etc. you can learn a lot VERY quickly while still adhering to more traditional painting methods etc. If you have a Nintendo DS or Ipod touch/iphone, look into getting a copy of colors! to use as a "painting sketch book". I find this is a great way to learn and experiment do to its sense of impermanence if need be! Granted it has you doing VERY small gestures...which is harder esp. for new artists...

    Visit the colors! gallery and watch people make their drawings! VERY informative and you can learn a lot from watching others!

    http://colors.collectingsmiles.com/

    You have to click on the image and scroll down to get the play back going...

    Again- the most important thing is to draw in a way that you like, and draw things that motivate you to draw as much as possible! Be that naked woman, hay stacks, or thumb tacks...
    Last edited by wacom; 12-15-2008 at 04:47 PM.

  12. #27
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    So here is my badly scanned final and some doodles I did in my new sketch book. Got a book on different graffiti styles across the world and was attempting to integrate some of the techniques to my own style. It's a lot more fun than drawing random still life #384.

    Wacom: Ya I have the colors! program on my ds, it's a lot of fun though I haven't produced much with it. I have a 12 hour drive tomorrow so I'll probably spend at least a couple of hours trying it out.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    edit: the gimp broke my second image I'll have to rescan it when I get back.
    Why is an elephant big, grey, and wrinkly?
    Because if he was small, white, and round he'd be an aspirin.

  13. #28
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wacom View Post
    "Learning to draw..." Is a funny statement to me now, because I realize as an illustrator (I never said a good one!) that being an "artist" means a life long pursuit of the unattainable. What I'm trying to say is no matter what your level, you should always be "learning to draw" in a sense, or you're not pushing yourself.

    Here are my 2cents...

    Try to think in volumes and when that fails...shapes. Think of lines as a farce that you have to live with that try and describe shapes and volumes. Try to think in terms of "constructive" drawing while being keen to observe. DO NOT become a camera- experience the subject and use knowledge of what things are to aide you.

    I say these things because I was taught how to "draw" in school in a very de-constructive way. I became fairly good at copying what I was looking at- but I didn't realize until later, when I needed to create things out of my head for concepts etc. that I had no understanding of what I was seeing.

    That being said, try as MANY different forms of "drawing" as you can. Stick with the one that interests you most, or has the potential to get you to your goals quickly, but always re-visit the ones you thought were useless or too hard- you'd be surprised at what things "click" after you gain more experience and you've discovered a new need for what once you thought was meaningless. The most important thing is to observe and draw as much as you can- regardless of what the subject is. There is no correct "way" only your final image!

    I find that the Vilppu method of seeing and working is a nice balance of current techniques and renascences knowledge. There are many others who have a similar approach though- so search around for one that fits your mentality and experience level...

    I'd also implore you to try and "paint" things, using nothing more that a loose background sketch to start and build on, to help you think in terms of light and shade, volume an shapes. In the olden days (like 10 years ago) this was kind of unattainable for the average poor artist...but with a cheap pen tablet and gimp/ps etc. you can learn a lot VERY quickly while still adhering to more traditional painting methods etc. If you have a Nintendo DS or Ipod touch/iphone, look into getting a copy of colors! to use as a "painting sketch book". I find this is a great way to learn and experiment do to its sense of impermanence if need be! Granted it has you doing VERY small gestures...which is harder esp. for new artists...

    Visit the colors! gallery and watch people make their drawings! VERY informative and you can learn a lot from watching others!

    http://colors.collectingsmiles.com/

    You have to click on the image and scroll down to get the play back going...

    Again- the most important thing is to draw in a way that you like, and draw things that motivate you to draw as much as possible! Be that naked woman, hay stacks, or thumb tacks...
    Great post wacom
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

  14. #29
    Cultural Engineer Liber777's Avatar
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    It was written about a century ago, but I love this book:

    'The Practice and Science of Drawing' - Harold Speed

    http://www.amazon.com/Practice-Scien...1186256&sr=8-8


    Looks like this is the current edition:
    http://www.amazon.com/Practice-Scien...1186256&sr=8-4
    << Nothing is true, everything is permitted >>

    DaVinci Resolve, Fusion, Generation, LightWave, ChronoSculpt, NevronMotion, REDcine-X Pro,
    Nuendo, messiahStudio Pro 5, VT[4] v4.6, SpeedEDIT 2...

  15. #30
    Graham Toms bluerider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liber777 View Post
    It was written about a century ago, but I love this book:

    'The Practice and Science of Drawing' - Harold Speed

    http://www.amazon.com/Practice-Scien...1186256&sr=8-8


    Looks like this is the current edition:
    http://www.amazon.com/Practice-Scien...1186256&sr=8-4
    Looks like a great recommendation. I read the Excerpt from "The practice of Science of Drawing", fascinating.
    The ethereal riders gallop over the rooftops

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