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Thread: ocean surface

  1. #1
    Super Member omichon's Avatar
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    ocean surface

    I am working on an ocean surface, and most of my search results lead to a tutorial at www.simplylightwave.com, but unfortunately I got an error when trying to connect to the website.
    All other tutorials I have found are really old now.
    Any other idea or more recent development on this topic ?
    Could nodes help to put some foam regarding the angle between poyls at crests, for example ?
    Thanks for any help or suggestion.
    www.oliviermichon.fr | 3D Animation, Motion Graphics and Broadcast Design.

  2. #2
    I'd also very much like to find a solution. Because of the different sizes (heights) of the ocean waves a simple Y-gradient won't work. (Big waves have foam at the crest, but so do small waves.)

    Okay, just brainstorming here: The definition of a crest of an oceanwave is that it's the highest point within a certain area, or, that the nearby surrounding area is lower. Hmmm, Dponts "Nearest Point node" comes to mind, but I'm not sure if I'm on the right track here (I'm pretty bad with math and nodes and stuff). If we would be able to not only evaluate the nearest point but a certain number of nearest points, let's say the 20 nearest points, then we could say that if those 20 nearest points are a certain amount lower (Y distance) than our point, then our point is a crest.
    But then, the crest of a wave isn't just a peak (like a mountain), it's a stretched peak... I'm gonna need some more coffee...

    Did all this make any sense?

    Like I said, I'm just brainstorming here. Hopefully somebody can come up with something.
    Last edited by serge; 01-14-2008 at 07:13 AM.

  3. #3
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Maybe this would be a good chance to try out William Vaughans tutorial about distance controlled localized morphing. In his video he makes something that looks similar to an ocean wave, I'm sure it could be adapted.

    Here's the link to his video:
    ftp://ftp.newtek.com/multimedia/movies/w3dw/NormalD.mov

  4. #4
    Etch, yes, for breaking waves something like this could work. Or Dpont's mdd pointer node with which we can layer the displacements might work better. (Or a combination of the two.)
    But Olivier's question is specifically about creating foam at crests. So, once the crest or breaking wave is created how do you generate foam at that point (preferably without the manual placement of emitters )?

  5. #5
    obfuscated SDK hacker Lightwolf's Avatar
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    Depending on how you approach it, here is something I'd try:
    Use the same procedural you used to create the displacement, but increase the contrast. This can be layered onto the surface as a white layer to show where the foam/splashes will start.
    You could also use the same procedural to control where an emitter will emit particles (use it as a texture, and make the actual ocean surface, or a low-res proxy mesh, emit).

    As long as the main parameters for the procedural are the same, you can change the contrast and still have the same pattern (i.e. some of the included procedurals have an offset parameter).

    Cheers,
    Mike

  6. #6
    Registered User Etch's Avatar
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    Oh sorry totally misunderstood the question.

    The only thing that comes to mind is using hypervoxels tied to the geometry of the waves, that only become visible once they pass a certain point. If it works like it does in my mind then it would kind of be a reverse to what you were saying (the whole certain number of points closest to point A). You could cheat a little bit with the emitter and only allow the desired amount of particles to be generated at the point of null.

    Would that work? From my very limited experience in layout that's pretty much all I can think to contribute, sorry I can't be of more help.

  7. #7
    Super Member omichon's Avatar
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    I think the localized morphing idea is suitable for algae or any other subaquatic vegetation, but not for an ocean where waves are not at a predefined location. I can't imagine how to define such surface with morphs.
    I also tried to find out some nodes combinations from Denis that could help (he always has some) but I am not great at that game
    Brainstorming in progress....


    doh ! sorry, I am bit slow to reply.
    Last edited by omichon; 01-14-2008 at 07:34 AM.
    www.oliviermichon.fr | 3D Animation, Motion Graphics and Broadcast Design.

  8. #8
    Super Member omichon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lightwolf
    Depending on how you approach it, here is something I'd try:
    Use the same procedural you used to create the displacement, but increase the contrast. This can be layered onto the surface as a white layer to show where the foam/splashes will start.
    You could also use the same procedural to control where an emitter will emit particles (use it as a texture, and make the actual ocean surface, or a low-res proxy mesh, emit).

    As long as the main parameters for the procedural are the same, you can change the contrast and still have the same pattern (i.e. some of the included procedurals have an offset parameter).

    Cheers,
    Mike
    Good suggestion, Mike !
    I have to try this way. Thanks !
    www.oliviermichon.fr | 3D Animation, Motion Graphics and Broadcast Design.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Lightwolf
    Depending on how you approach it, here is something I'd try:
    Use the same procedural you used to create the displacement, but increase the contrast. This can be layered onto the surface as a white layer to show where the foam/splashes will start.
    You could also use the same procedural to control where an emitter will emit particles (use it as a texture, and make the actual ocean surface, or a low-res proxy mesh, emit).

    As long as the main parameters for the procedural are the same, you can change the contrast and still have the same pattern (i.e. some of the included procedurals have an offset parameter).

    Cheers,
    Mike
    Mike, could you please explain? Wouldn't this work more or less the same as a simple Y-gradient? It would create foam at the high places of the mesh, but also the flat high places, no? You only want foam at all the crest parts of the mesh (whether they are at a high place or low place). (A gradient based on the slope also won't work because that will create foam at the valleys as well as the peaks of the mesh.)

  10. #10
    Super Member omichon's Avatar
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    I don't know if it's possible, but if there is a way to get informations about the displacement (nodal stress map ?) it would be easier to select crests, no ?
    www.oliviermichon.fr | 3D Animation, Motion Graphics and Broadcast Design.

  11. #11
    obfuscated SDK hacker Lightwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by serge
    Mike, could you please explain? Wouldn't this work more or less the same as a simple Y-gradient? It would create foam at the high places of the mesh, but also the flat high places, no? You only want foam at all the crest parts of the mesh (whether they are at a high place or low place). (A gradient based on the slope also won't work because that will create foam at the valleys as well as the peaks of the mesh.)
    More or less, yes.
    However, you can still layer/subtract the same procedural with different settings to get an outline for example. This gives you a whole new range of possibilities.

    Cheers,
    Mike

  12. #12
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    I remember a very convincing ocean and foam
    mainly concentrated around a submarine in LW 8.0 Content,
    may be a slope gradient in layer texture will work
    for crest.

    Denis.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Lightwolf
    More or less, yes.
    However, you can still layer/subtract the same procedural with different settings to get an outline for example. This gives you a whole new range of possibilities.
    Have to try that. Thanks Mike.
    Quote Originally Posted by dpont
    I remember a very convincing ocean and foam
    mainly concentrated around a submarine in LW 8.0 Content,
    may be a slope gradient in layer texture will work
    for crest.

    Denis.
    Hi Denis,
    But the problem with slope is that it would generate foam at the valleys as well as the peaks of the mesh.

  14. #14
    Have you try to use two planes? one for the water, the other one for foam?
    The first and the second will use the same displacement map to simulate the waves but the second will be a very very little bit up the first and got transparency or clip map, so that it will be only visible at the top of the wave...it coud be done with a gradient texture I think
    Last edited by MUCUS; 01-14-2008 at 09:01 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpont
    I remember a very convincing ocean and foam
    mainly concentrated around a submarine in LW 8.0 Content...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	typ21.jpg 
Views:	429 
Size:	65.6 KB 
ID:	53782

    Denis.

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