Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Anti-Flicker

  1. #1
    Registered User Andyjaggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    4,327

    Anti-Flicker

    Here are some conclusions from my past 4 days of Vue tests.

    I'm on the verge of getting flicker free renders. I can feel it in my blood.

    Vue Notes.

    Soft shadows drastically increase render times. 3-6X as long!
    Recompute subrays seems to only have an effect with reflective/refractive materials.
    Even if you scene doesn't have any relfective, refractive, or transparent materials, disabling these in the render options will still drastically cut render times with no effect on quality.
    MB adds render time but not as heavy a hit as you would excpect. Maybe 10-20% increase in time.
    Systematic is slower then optimized but gives much superior results when using motion blur. It helps reduce flicker though.
    Rendering all buffers doesn't seem to add any significant render time.
    Keep advanced effects slide at 46% for best quality vs time ratio.
    Turn off lens flare to save a small amount of render time.
    Set quality threshold to 100% and then adjust the min max values.
    Set style to soft for animations.
    blur style also works but will of coarse provide too much blur, it may work for some types of animation.
    In the advanced animation option enable distance blurring, set the value to 1-2% and the radius to around 0.1-0.3 for best results.
    Texture filtering can reduce flicker but it can destory the look of your plants. Use with caution.

    !!! When rendering with hypevue and using the advanced animation anti-flicker options if you abort the render you must wait for hypervue to quit. Even though the tiff files
    will be saved in the folder hypervue processes the images and does interframe AA after the render finishes or after you abort it. If you use these frames before hypervue
    closes then they will not be done! If they say tmp in them then they are not finished.

    Still need to test optimize last render pass.

    GI can create splotchiness in your renders, it looks like flicker but it is not flicker. Try cranking up the quality settings. The general rule I have read is that you should set it to -1. However
    this setting has created noticable splotchiness in my animations. (Still testing this as I write it)

    I haven't had much luck with baking of illumination maps to polygon surfaces. It didn't seem to save much render time, most likely since the plants are the most render intensive and you can't bake illumination data to the vegetaion. This is potentially usefull for full radiosity solutions in arch viz.

  2. #2
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    5,585
    This may seem like an absolutely daft suggestion, but have you considered using Lightwave to clean up the output frames?

    I'm going from memory here, not least because I can't get the Newtek search engine to look for messages over a year old, but I remember having great success using wavefilter image which had an option to soften / blur ONLY pixels with a relatively high contrast. I found that this was like being able to apply AA in post in some cases - the images did not get softened overall, but I found it could seriously reduce flicker.

    So if you loaded a Vue image sequence into a LW background, and applied this before outputing, you may find it helps. It's also very quick, so it's easy to experiment with different settings.

    Nick
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

  3. #3
    I remember having great success using wavefilter image which had an option to soften / blur ONLY pixels with a relatively high contrast. I found that this was like being able to apply AA in post in some cases - the images did not get softened overall, but I found it could seriously reduce flicker.
    That's a very interesting suggestion.
    Shoot...right now my machines are tied up on a render so I can't test this theory. Were you able to remove all the flicker or just reduce it somewhat?
    I guess even if some flicker reduction can be done within Vue and the rest removed with WaveFilter, there just might be hope yet that Vue can be used for more than just stills.

  4. #4
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    5,585
    Quote Originally Posted by digefxgrp
    That's a very interesting suggestion.
    Shoot...right now my machines are tied up on a render so I can't test this theory. Were you able to remove all the flicker or just reduce it somewhat?
    I guess even if some flicker reduction can be done within Vue and the rest removed with WaveFilter, there just might be hope yet that Vue can be used for more than just stills.
    I think that if you lowered the softening threshold enough to remove it completely, the blur would be unacceptable. All I can tell you for sure is that I found it made a significant improvement in cases where distant flicker was a problem.

    And as I said first time around, it was VERY quick, so it's easy to experiment with different settings.

    The only other thing that occurs to me is that if it's the distant stuff that needs softening, can the depth pass be used to control the strength of the effect in a useful manner?
    Faith is the opposite of Intelligence.

    Touched by his noodley appendage!
    My Lightwave Graphics & Downloads!!!

  5. #5
    Super Member 3djock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Southern Fried North Carolina
    Posts
    307
    Another suggestion don't turn on blur on the camera it increases rendering time dramatically. another suggestion turn off the bump map on the leaves.

  6. #6
    I'm working down this same path as well, reducing flicker in Vue5i. One thing I'm experimenting with is processing the frames in After Effects using time stretch, frame blending, and motion blur, along with a depth map and lens blur. Getting some interesting results, I haven't determined if it is fully useful yet. Using time stretch I am able to render a half or third or quarter as many frames, and use the extra Vue render time to nudge up the AA and quality settings. The flicker definitely slows down when time stretched, but doesn't yet disappear. I'm hoping some of these other settings will reduce it to a minimum. Just have to wait for it to finish rendering to see what it looks like now.

    Is Vue 6.5 any better or faster than Vue5i?

    -Bill C.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •