Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28

Thread: Hypervoxels

  1. #1
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    14

    Hypervoxels

    Hello! I'm pretty new to the hypervoxel effect and I was wondering if it is normal that it takes eight hours to do about one second of hypervoxels. If it isn't what am I doing wrong? And if it is, is there a faster way?
    There is also a thing on the render window that says pass 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5, 5/5 etc. What is this?



    I know I have a lot of questions and the manual doesn't help at all.

    Any help with just one of these questions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    It depends on how many hypervoxels you have. The more particles there are, the longer it takes. Transparency and size also affect things. 10000 particles that fill the camera will take a long time, 100 particles in the distance will be fairly quick.

    "Pass" in this case means the anti-aliasing passes, in the camera settings.

  3. #3
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    14
    thank you so much! It helps to know that there is someone out there who can help! Thanks Again.

  4. #4
    8 hrs is a long time to wait to see an effect. Can you exaplain what you are trying to do? There might be an easier way to see the result faster because there are shortcuts to everything when testing before a final render.

  5. #5
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    14
    sure, all i was really trying to do was test the hypervoxel effect. I had a planet rotating, it would contract, and explode. the planet part only took about thirty minutes, but the explosian itself is what took forever. I'm hoping to do more with them, but if it takes that long to do it, well... Anyway that's what I'm trying to do. I did also try VIPER but i don't really know how to use it. :^)
    Last edited by vhfw; 01-21-2007 at 09:48 AM.

  6. #6
    Well if you are just starting out to use it, you can use only one particle and you can select sprites which render faster.

    Good idea to look in the manual for this and see if you can find some tutorials to help you.

    You use viper by making sure the edit pannel for the thing you are editing is open such as the Surface editor, make sure viper is enabled and then press f9 to render the scene. After that viper will update as you make changes.

    I know there are some tutorials on hypervoxels here on this site, so you can find that in the tutorials section.

    Good Luck.

  7. #7
    Super Member SplineGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hastings, New Zealand
    Posts
    7,731
    Usually its because of using too many particles. Lots of HVs can take a very long time to render.

  8. #8
    And by the way my idea to use one particle and a sprite was because of what Larry said in another thread.

    Larry you have some tuts on this don't you?

  9. #9
    Super Member SplineGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hastings, New Zealand
    Posts
    7,731
    I do have some tuts on HVs. More are currently being produced

  10. #10
    Great. Looking foreward to it.

  11. #11
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    5,636
    It will help if you can describe what type of HV's you are using, and the effect you are trying to achive. But that does sound a VERY long time.

    The degree of overlap plays a big part in the render time - if you start with the auto size, and shrink them a bit, that should be a good starting point.

    Sprites are the fastest method - and experiment with the quality settings too, using the lowest you can get away with. Showing the image you got would help too, then we can get more specific.

    There are several sample HV scenes for playing with on my downloads page, help yourself.

    http://www.starbase1.co.uk/downloads.htm

    Nick
    Specialist subjects: Unflown space projects, and the space program of the Soviet Union.

    My main Web site

  12. #12
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    14
    thank you so much for all of these great solutions. I'm going to try each one. Before I posted this, I used a volume hypervoxel with a 50 particle limit, and I had a one pass antialiasing. I had set the frames to 300 so I could have a longer explosion. I was shocked to see that it took eight hours to do about a third of these frames. Where are Larry's tutorials? I would like to see them. I have to render the picture so hold on a sec. Anyway, thank you for that website with the hypervoxels as well.

  13. #13
    Just click on a lonk below Larry's name.

  14. #14
    May the sauce be with you starbase1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    5,636
    Another trick to speed things up - as I mentioned, pHV overlap slows things down quite a bit, and when the particles first appear they often come from a small volume or piont.

    If you can get awaywith a bigger emmitter volume it will speed up.

    As a more general alternative, look at controling the particle size with a gradient, keyed on relative particle age. Use this so they start and end at size 0, and spend most of the time at 100% - this also means that they don't pop into existence or vanish suddenly...


    Nick
    Specialist subjects: Unflown space projects, and the space program of the Soviet Union.

    My main Web site

  15. #15
    Also there was a thread here about steam. There were some real quick simple examples. Search it and you'll find it.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •