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Thread: Blast from the past...

  1. #1
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    Blast from the past...

    Not exactly Lightwave related, but still 3D.

    I have been clearing out an old PC, and backing up files and folders. I noticed the first 3D software I bought was still installed - trueSpace. All my project files are there, with only the odd missing texture or material. I couldn't resist having a poke about with it. Now, I remember why Lightwave was such a breath of fresh air when I moved across, but I have been impressed with many of the features which were in tS 4.3, even though I didn't understand or use many of them at the time. It has add edges, a version of bandsaw (kind of), context-sensitive selection for points, edges and polys, UV mapping, a scene editor with channel curve editing very similar to LW's, a fairly respectable radiosity renderer, and quite a few more. Not bad for a piece of software I bought 20 years ago. SO naturally, I have installed it on my Windows 10 laptop.

    The biggest discovery though was that keystrokes can be assigned. So I have been going through the tools, giving them keyboard shortcuts which mirror those I work with in LW. That alone has made it far more relaxing to work with.

    I had planned to render a few of my old projects in HD, as I had virtually zero processing power 20 years ago, but with the keystroke discovery, I might even try a fresh project, to see what I can manage with it using the knowledge and understanding I have picked up in the meantime...

    I just thought a few others on here might find this of interest, as I'm sure there's more than a handful of other Wavers who came on board from trueSpace. I've attached a couple of my less rubbish work with it: a Star Wars style spaceship, and a katana piece which got an honourable mention in the Caligari gallery on their website... It's still there on the Wayback Machine. LOL

    Regards,

    Derek

    *Note to Mods... I'm not 'promoting competitor's products, seeing as how Caligari ceased to exist over a decade ago... I'm just sharing a pleasant wander down memory lane, revisiting old haunts, so to speak...
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    Last edited by kyuzo; 08-12-2020 at 10:11 AM.

  2. #2
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuzo View Post
    Not exactly Lightwave related, but still 3D.

    I have been clearing out an old PC, and backing up files and folders. I noticed the first 3D software I bought was still installed - trueSpace. All my project files are there, with only the odd missing texture or material. I couldn't resist having a poke about with it. Now, I remember why Lightwave was such a breath of fresh air when I moved across, but I have been impressed with many of the features which were in tS 4.3, even though I didn't understand or use many of them at the time. It has add edges, a version of bandsaw (kind of), context-sensitive selection for points, edges and polys, UV mapping, a scene editor with channel curve editing very similar to LW's, a fairly respectable radiosity renderer, and quite a few more. Not bad for a piece of software I bought 20 years ago. SO naturally, I have installed it on my Windows 10 laptop.

    The biggest discovery though was that keystrokes can be assigned. So I have been going through the tools, giving them keyboard shortcuts which mirror those I work with in LW. That alone has made it far more relaxing to work with.

    I had planned to render a few of my old projects in HD, as I had virtually zero processing power 20 years ago, but with the keystroke discovery, I might even try a fresh project, to see what I can manage with it using the knowledge and understanding I have picked up in the meantime...

    I just thought a few others on here might find this of interest, as I'm sure there's more than a handful of other Wavers who came on board from trueSpace. I've attached a couple of my less rubbish work with it: a Star Wars style spaceship, and a katana piece which got an honourable mention in the Caligari gallery on their website... It's still there on the Wayback Machine. LOL

    Regards,

    Derek

    *Note to Mods... I'm not 'promoting competitor's products, seeing as how Caligari ceased to exist over a decade ago... I'm just sharing a pleasant wander down memory lane, revisiting old haunts, so to speak...
    I think my first ever 3d software I tested was real3D, followed by truespace (it still have some nifty stuff there)
    after truespace I think i tried imagine (originally for amiga..which I had, and still have in the attic)
    After that I found out about Lightwave.

    Truespace discountinued itīs development and support 2010, not sure if anyone is still doing some development on it, scripting etc, I now my brother liked it, but I told him there are far more better free tools out there today that would blow his mind if you compare to what truespace can do, but he hasnīt picked up on that..in fact I do not think he opens any 3D software at all these days, he is busy fixing his home, playing guitars and a lot of other stuff.

  3. #3
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    I used Truespace at home for about two years off an on after it became freeware, so I guess that would have been version 7.6.

    Overall, I was very impressed with it. The only thing I didn't like was the feel of the separate layouts 7.6 had (the older 6.6 model core and the newer workspace core).

    I loved the cleaner workspace core, but not all tools were available (or visible, maybe?) in workspace, so for me there was a lot of switching back and forth. Although, that may have also been a limit on my understanding of the software as well.

    Otherwise, it was a pretty robust program and I enjoyed it.

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    Prometheus - I'm sure I had a friend who used Imagine. That was the first desktop 3D app I saw in person. I think my first was trueSpace2, free on a coverdisk of 3D World magazine, or whatever it was called back then. I'm not sure if there is any development as such, but there is a forum somewhere with a small following that seem to be active.

    RPSchmidt - The general feeling seems to be that version 6 was the best. I think after MS bought it, version 7 broke lots of historical stuff, so version 6 was included as a separate workspace. A bit odd, but there you go. I never used any version past 4.3.

    I used tS to produce a few pieces which were published in the newspaper company where I was working at the time. I enjoyed it, but found it a bit slow to work with, and Lightwave was a massive step up. A lot of the features are buried in hidden menus, so it was probably way more fully-featured than many thought.

    I've just discovered that in 4.3, hierarchies can be set up by dragging and dropping n the scene editor. Blew my mind!

    I can't install one of my old UV plugins as it needs a serial number, and the one I have jotted down in my manual isn't working (might be specific to the PC it's installed on or something, and the company is long gone).
    Mind you, I have discovered that a load of free plugins are still available on the Wayback Machine, including an .obj importer and exporter. So I can use Lightwave to replace my trueSpace UV mapping 'plugin'. LOL.

    Happy days...

  5. #5
    Cow Orker cagey5's Avatar
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    My first was also Imagine. Quite tricky to use from what I recall. Next came Inspire3D which cost more than Lightwave does now I think.
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  6. #6
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    My first was... dare I say it out loud... Ray Dream Designer.

    At least, that was the first 3d program I used that got me hooked on 3d.

  7. #7
    It's great to reminisce with old software renders. Kudos for having saved some of your still renders.

    My first 3D software that I used briefly in the mid 80's was made by a company called West End Film. It ran on a really slow IBM pc 386 computer (This was running on DOS, before Windows). After that I used another IBM DOS software called AIM3D (which stood for Art in Motion). That was much better, but nothing compared to discovering Lightwave running on the Amiga 2000.

  8. #8
    Founding member raymondtrace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuzo View Post
    ...Mind you, I have discovered that a load of free plugins are still available on the Wayback Machine, including an .obj importer and exporter...
    There are some well-packed bundles loaded with plugins here: http://truespace3d.free.fr

    TrueSpace's interface should be taught in design/development school, as what to avoid.
    LW4, 7.5D, 2015, 2018, 2019, 2020 running portably on a USB drive on an Amiga 2500 running Wine.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cagey5 View Post
    My first was also Imagine. Quite tricky to use from what I recall. Next came Inspire3D which cost more than Lightwave does now I think.
    Imagine was my favourite 3d app from that time ('90).
    It had "Form Editor"
    and remembering it I made special LW plugin in 2002
    ImageForm
    which evolved to ImageSeqForm
    which evolved to full FormEditor
    They were taking image as profile, then image sequence as profile, then be able to edit profiles by mouse. Between profiles there was generated mesh.

    Somebody still alive who bought them in 2002-2005 from me?

  10. #10
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raymondtrace View Post
    TrueSpace's interface should be taught in design/development school, as what to avoid.
    I agree.

  11. #11
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    I must say, the interface is much better with decent keyboard shortcuts assigned.
    The icons never bothered me at the time because thats what I was used to. I suppose with a small feature-set, icons are fine. When the number of features grows, the icons begin to become a bit less comprehensible.
    I think version 4 was probably just passing that point.

  12. #12
    Man of many cells. shrox's Avatar
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    Ah, I remember the future.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axis3d View Post
    It's great to reminisce with old software renders. Kudos for having saved some of your still renders.

    My first 3D software that I used briefly in the mid 80's was made by a company called West End Film. It ran on a really slow IBM pc 386 computer (This was running on DOS, before Windows). After that I used another IBM DOS software called AIM3D (which stood for Art in Motion). That was much better, but nothing compared to discovering Lightwave running on the Amiga 2000.
    Ahhh.. '386' PCs... I'd forgotten about that era. Reading through the Inside Truespace book, written in 1999, tS would run on 32MB of RAM, while 64MB was the recommended amount. It's amazing what was achieved with so little. And apparently, at the time, PCs with 256MB of RAM 'isn't unheard of'.

    It really was a great era to learn in, with minimal resources, and having to be as efficient as possible with models and textures. Good habits to pick up.

    I had to google AIM3D and West End Film. Not much out there about those.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by kyuzo View Post
    Ahhh.. '386' PCs... I'd forgotten about that era. Reading through the Inside Truespace book, written in 1999, tS would run on 32MB of RAM, while 64MB was the recommended amount. It's amazing what was achieved with so little. And apparently, at the time, PCs with 256MB of RAM 'isn't unheard of'.

    It really was a great era to learn in, with minimal resources, and having to be as efficient as possible with models and textures. Good habits to pick up.

    I had to google AIM3D and West End Film. Not much out there about those.
    You're right about minimal resources in those earlier days. I remember when I got my Amiga 2000 way back when. It came with 16 mb of ram, which was plenty to run the Video Toaster and Lightwave. A friend of mine had a Amiga/Video Toaster system also. I remember getting into an argument with him when he said he wanted to upgrade to 32 mb of ram. I said "What are you going to do with all that ram?!" Ahh, how times have changed. You can't even boot your computer up unless you have 8 gigs of ram these days!

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