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Thread: May the 4th be with you! Luke's Lightsaber

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    May the 4th be with you! Luke's Lightsaber

    Hi. I felt like trying to model's Luke's Return of the Jedi Lightsaber. I uploaded some plans and I'm trying out different approaches. My latest attempt was to import an EPS trace and lathe it. But I hate the way some of the edges twist around the center. And I want to try the rail clone tool for the repeated section. Click image for larger version. 

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    Use TrueFillet from http://www.trueart.eu
    to smooth some sharp edges of profile (prior Lathe).
    It is free interactive plug-in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Use TrueFillet from http://www.trueart.eu
    to smooth some sharp edges of profile (prior Lathe).
    It is free interactive plug-in.
    Thanks for the tip, but I really didn't like the lathe approach. I do have the TrueFillet already installed. Thanks!
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    So far it's been a real learning experience. Smooth Shift and Multi Shift are your best friends. But the protrusions at the pommel area of Luke's Lightsaber are curved to follow the cylindrical shape. Should I just cut and merge some polygons and bevel it out?



    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie2Strokes View Post
    Thanks for the tip, but I really didn't like the lathe approach
    Seriously? In any 3d app of this world you would do it with lathe tool or lathe modifier run on 2d profile ..
    Yes it is making a lot of polygons.

  6. #6
    skeptic lertola2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie2Strokes View Post
    So far it's been a real learning experience. Smooth Shift and Multi Shift are your best friends. But the protrusions at the pommel area of Luke's Lightsaber are curved to follow the cylindrical shape. Should I just cut and merge some polygons and bevel it out?


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lightsaber_Build2.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	211.5 KB 
ID:	147640Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lightsaber_Build2b.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	202.7 KB 
ID:	147641
    Did you create that with smooth shift and multi shift? You can get the same results with the lathe tool. I think the twisting you mentioned in your first post was because you center for the lathe was not exactly in line with the imported eps file edges. For the protrusions I would extrude them. You could just leave them as an intersecting mesh or you could boolean union it with the rest of the mesh.

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    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    I think there is two ways to think of when choosing method.

    if you have a clear image to follow, lathing a traced curve is probably optimal in terms of speed, but you do not know how the full shape will be until it is made.
    While if you have no image as reference ..and start from scratch, you may look in to multishift and can change edits easier while you model, and you see the results while adding shifts per beveled insets..in a way you do not
    see until the shape would have been lathed.

    But mainly..I would probably also go for lathing, and you can set segments as you choose, and lotīs of polys, yes ..if smooth curve insets requires it, no way around it.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Seriously? In any 3d app of this world you would do it with lathe tool or lathe modifier run on 2d profile ..
    Yes it is making a lot of polygons.
    You can also scan it, or even better use photogrammetry, then clean it up..just for the fun of it and realism based on true shapes

  8. #8
    Super Member Kryslin's Avatar
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    When I did this a while ago, I started with a cylinder, and beveled my way up.

    The end result:

    (Apologies for the bad radiosity. This was done with 2015.3.)
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    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryslin View Post
    When I did this a while ago, I started with a cylinder, and beveled my way up.

    The end result:

    (Apologies for the bad radiosity. This was done with 2015.3.)
    Yes..pretty similare to multishifting, it may actually be a little faster to just bevel your way up..if you prefer to do this ..but the question is why..if you had image references, it would perhaps be faster to lathe.
    Unless you want/need to see the insets along the way just as you model it, with lathe..you have one shot..and if itīs too many polygons, or to little, you have to undo, go back to the spline profile and adjust and then lathe again.

    So thereīs the difference, if you are pretty sure with your profile spline editing capabilities and got an eye for that..go with that, if not..beveling might be one way..but a little slower.

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