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Thread: Spend My Money 2020 Edition

  1. #1

    Spend My Money 2020 Edition

    My trusty Win7 x64 system is about done, so it's time for something Shiny And New.

    Initial dream is a Threadripper 3970x, an ASRock Taichi STRx4 mobo, M.2 drives, and lotsa RAM.

    Is there a reason to buy RAM faster than baseline, besides overclocking?

    Also, AMD lists the Noctua NH U14S air cooler as suitable for the 3970X. If I'm not overclocking, why not the Nocuta?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulk View Post
    My trusty Win7 x64 system is about done, so it's time for something Shiny And New.

    Initial dream is a Threadripper 3970x, an ASRock Taichi STRx4 mobo, M.2 drives, and lotsa RAM.

    Is there a reason to buy RAM faster than baseline, besides overclocking?
    I guess that depends on what you mean by "baseline".

    If you are talking about mhz and no OC, for your mobo model and recommended RAM you essentiallly have two choices; 2400mhz or 3200mhz. ASRock lists a bunch of mhz values for your board, but memory manufacturers are, for the most part, only producing chips in the 2400mhz and 3200mhz range.

    Most mobos also generally run slightly under the memory chip's mhz rating.

    So it would make sense to just go ahead and buy 3200mhz RAM; if you buy 2400mhz RAM and you aren't OCing it, you might end up with RAM running at a lower clock frequency (for whatever reason... mobo issues, chip issues, etc). Your 2400mhz could actually clock at 2133, or even lower.

    If you start with 3200mhz rated, at least you will stay in that general area regardless of potential clock frequency issues.

    Also, based on my own experience, I would highly recommend Corsair or G.Skill. Check the user reviews on NewEgg or another similar direct sales site to get a better idea of which brand will perform best on your system.

    Quote Originally Posted by paulk View Post
    Also, AMD lists the Noctua NH U14S air cooler as suitable for the 3970X. If I'm not overclocking, why not the Nocuta?
    I am using the Noctua NH U14S myself, although my cpu is a Threadripper 1950x.

    The Noctua is outstanding.

    I am in the build phase with my new system (building an extreme custom case, so it has been taking forever!) but I recently did an out-of-case set up to update my mobo's BIOS, install Windows, and install all the latest drivers.

    After that, I installed 3d Mark and ran their stress test.

    During the test, my Threadripper 1950x only went above 40 degrees celsius once; a small spike up to 46 degrees celsius. In that same test, my nVidia Titan RTX ran at 75 degrees celsius for the duration of the test (no spikes).

    The Noctua never ramped up at all.

    The biggest plus is that the Noctua was dead silent. Like, whisper quiet.

    So I highly recommend the Noctua, definitely.

    Good luck with your build and I hope my advice helped.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by paulk View Post
    My trusty Win7 x64 system is about done, so it's time for something Shiny And New.

    Initial dream is a Threadripper 3970x, an ASRock Taichi STRx4 mobo, M.2 drives, and lotsa RAM.

    Is there a reason to buy RAM faster than baseline, besides overclocking?

    Also, AMD lists the Noctua NH U14S air cooler as suitable for the 3970X. If I'm not overclocking, why not the Nocuta?
    I built myself a 2990WX system about a year ago and use the Noctua NH U14S for cooling and it works great! Air coolers are much more reliable. I decided to install a 2nd fan on the cooler as well. The 2nd fan helps keep things a bit cooler but I don't think it really made a big difference. RAM is so fast these days that the difference between speeds is hardly noticeable. I just went for a good price and decent speed RAM. See my system specs on my signature below.
    Threadripper 2990WX, X399 MSI MEG Creation, 64GB 2400Mhz RAM, GTX 1070 Ti 8GB

    https://www.dynamicrenderings.com/

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    About Zen 2/Ryzen3xxx DDR4 memory, one interesting benchmark shows that 3000 vs 3800 is similar, if you use the manual settings recommended by the Ryzen DRAM calculator (not overclocked, just optimized). Just one render benchmark from Corona, but plenty of games benchmarks show the usual memory perf spread of 1-10%.

    https://www.techspot.com/review/1891...mance-scaling/

  5. #5
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    Here is a relevant benchmark of a new 3960x and all Noctua fans and a water cooler. Not identical to 3970x, but very close:

    https://adoredtv.com/testing-noctuas...better-on-air/

  6. #6
    Plays with fire sadkkf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulk View Post
    My trusty Win7 x64 system is about done, so it's time for something Shiny And New.

    Initial dream is a Threadripper 3970x, an ASRock Taichi STRx4 mobo, M.2 drives, and lotsa RAM.

    Is there a reason to buy RAM faster than baseline, besides overclocking?

    Also, AMD lists the Noctua NH U14S air cooler as suitable for the 3970X. If I'm not overclocking, why not the Nocuta?

    Can't say I'd recommend the ASRock MOBO. I have one in my current build that's been nothing but trouble. It still doesn't recognize the optical drive even after replacing the cables, trying different ports and replacing the drive itself. Before that it just crashed incessantly.

    I'm running the Intel I7 5820k.

    Using RAM slower than it's speced for seemed to fix a lot of my issues except for the optical drive.
    So much water, so few sharks.

    "...all men are created equal." -- US Declaration of Independence

  7. #7
    Really great feedback.

    Name brand DDR4-3200 RAM it is. I'll be downloading the Ryzen DRAM Calculator. Also, the Noctua NH U14S review alerted me to the fact that the cooler fits only certain cases, due to its height. One "D'OH!" avoided. Unless I want a very clean, clear side panel.

    Sadkkf, I had an "opportunity for improvement" with my HP printer when I tried the official drivers. When I "removed" the printer and let Windows find it and install it with its own drivers, opportunity inproved.

    Thanks to all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadkkf View Post
    Can't say I'd recommend the ASRock MOBO. I have one in my current build that's been nothing but trouble. It still doesn't recognize the optical drive even after replacing the cables, trying different ports and replacing the drive itself. Before that it just crashed incessantly.

    I'm running the Intel I7 5820k.

    Using RAM slower than it's speced for seemed to fix a lot of my issues except for the optical drive.
    I was going to call out ASRock myself, but all of my information about their boards is second hand and I didn't really have another reasonable recommendation, so I didn't think it would be useful.

    The board I went with for my build is a Gigabyte Designare Ex X399, which, when I bought it, was fairly expensive.

    I can say that when I did my out-of-box installs, my Gigabyte board started up immediately; BIOS update was effortless, Windows install (minus Windows updates, ugh) was accomplished with zero issues, and all drivers installed without any issues.

    Honestly, it was the most trouble-free build I've ever done.

    So I guess I would recommend the Gigabyte TRX40 Designare. It's gotten some good reviews and if it's anything like my board, it is tough as nails.

    Major drawback is that it's expensive compared to other boards.

  9. #9
    Plays with fire sadkkf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPSchmidt View Post
    I was going to call out ASRock myself, but all of my information about their boards is second hand and I didn't really have another reasonable recommendation, so I didn't think it would be useful.

    The board I went with for my build is a Gigabyte Designare Ex X399, which, when I bought it, was fairly expensive.

    I can say that when I did my out-of-box installs, my Gigabyte board started up immediately; BIOS update was effortless, Windows install (minus Windows updates, ugh) was accomplished with zero issues, and all drivers installed without any issues.

    Honestly, it was the most trouble-free build I've ever done.

    So I guess I would recommend the Gigabyte TRX40 Designare. It's gotten some good reviews and if it's anything like my board, it is tough as nails.

    Major drawback is that it's expensive compared to other boards.

    The weird thing for me is an IT friend of mine recommended ASRock after building several machines for his employees and had zero problems. Maybe mine was a lemon, but their customer support was enough to turn me off permanently.

    And thanks for the recommendation. In a year or so I'll be rebuilding and will have a look at Gigabyte.
    So much water, so few sharks.

    "...all men are created equal." -- US Declaration of Independence

  10. #10

    are you Sure you don't want a 3900X instead?

    way cheaper, and great performance.
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  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by erikals View Post
    are you Sure you don't want a 3900X instead?

    way cheaper, and great performance.
    True, but part of this is a belated Christmas present to myself, and fighting against my "responsible adult" side. I DO plan to minimize RGB blinky-blink, though.

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