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Thread: Arched windows-How would you model them?

  1. #31
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbrookes View Post
    Or you could:
    - place the image of the window in the background (front view)
    - create the outer polygon (points on one side, mirrored across Y-axis, select, and P for polygon)
    (use a half circle for the arch, like in the other examples people here have shown)
    - create the rectangles for the windows on the left side
    (scale or stretch copies of the arch curve points for the curved arch windows and make them into polygons too)
    - Mirror the polys across the Y-axis
    - Drill -> Stencil the windows (windows in foreground and outline polygon in background)
    - select the windows and cut and paste them to another layer
    - select the face surface of the drilled polygon that comprise the frame
    - Extrude the frame
    - Paste the window polygons into the frame and move them on Z-axis until they're inset as far as you want them to be.

    You could use this technique with pretty much any version of LightWave.

    Attachment 145786

    That also gives you the option to do all kinds of crazy bevels and to independently mess with the glass geometry, if you so wish.
    Attachment 145787
    Yes other options, fingers crossed here...seems like itīs taking quite a bit longer time to do than some of the processes already described, and I am not sure of accuracy with that method?

  2. #32
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prometheus View Post
    I donīt, I used to though.
    Makes no sense to get lw cad now for me that is, and when I think about it...it made no sense to get the latest Lightwave release at all, being a hobbyist currently
    It just so happened that I liked some stuff in there ..and just was compelled to get it.
    I must agree though, that if I once again would start to work professionally with Lightwave and modeling, LWcad would be in the top list.

  3. #33
    Super Member OlaHaldor's Avatar
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    To be fair you opened this thread with a question how LWCAD users would do it
    I'm (trying to at last.. I'm looking for a job, in case anyone sees this) doing 3D as a professional, but I'm not using LW and LWCAD on an everyday basis. I'm still on LW2015, and see no reason to upgrade yet. LWCAD is a whole other beast though. Worth every penny if you're stuck in LW land and do any kind of houses, fencing, pipes etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ma3rk View Post
    Good to see you popping up here Ola and particularly good to see someone who is proficient with using LWCad put out some fresh vids.
    I'm happy to share. And I'm happy someone sees the value.
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  4. #34
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlaHaldor View Post
    To be fair you opened this thread with a question how LWCAD users would do it
    I'm (trying to at last.. I'm looking for a job, in case anyone sees this) doing 3D as a professional, but I'm not using LW and LWCAD on an everyday basis. I'm still on LW2015, and see no reason to upgrade yet. LWCAD is a whole other beast though. Worth every penny if you're stuck in LW land and do any kind of houses, fencing, pipes etc.


    I'm happy to share. And I'm happy someone sees the value.
    I welcomed your input highly...dont let my comments on the approch let you think otherwise.


    to be fair..its a discussion that ultimately always should be compared with the premise of" how to do it" built in to the topic

  5. #35
    Curmudgeon in Training Ma3rk's Avatar
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    As with most things in life & software, there's always more than one way of removing the dermis of the proverbial feline.

    Taking the position of "Hobbyist" vs. "Profession" though in my mind is moot, & somewhat self defeating. I know a number of "hobbyists" who could frankly put many "professionals" to shame in their field.

    But we all have to deal with the same common, limiting factor: Time.

    I'm a "hobbyist" too in that I don't make a living with CG. I'm not trying to, or at least not directly. That could change.

    Yes, it's worthwhile to know how to do something with the basic tools; knowledge never goes out of style (although you'd certainly be hard pressed to find examples in current day). You always work with what you have & know, but if better tools are available and allows me to work faster, more efficiently, and of most importance with easily understandable and often with non-destructable steps, and for a price equal to a few hours of work, why wouldn't I go with that tool? Pride I did it natively? Cost? Phfft! What is your time worth to you?

    Time is the real, non-renewable resource, not money. And at this point I've a bit more of one than the other, so perhaps that colors my view.

    Just my proverbial 2Ē.
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  6. #36

    Taking the position of "Hobbyist" vs. "Profession" though in my mind is moot, & somewhat self defeating.
    I know a number of "hobbyists" who could frankly put many "professionals" to shame in their field.
    From my point, it was more about Professionals have the cash to fork out for LWcad.
    Hobbyists might not have that luxury.


    Yes, quite a few Hobbyists have major skills.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ma3rk View Post
    Time is the real, non-renewable resource, not money. And at this point I've a bit more of one than the other, so perhaps that colors my view.
    Exactly. Get the tools that you can work efficiently with, hobbyist or pro, if you can afford it.

    Using software just because it's free or low priced or wasting time with tedious workarounds or bad workflows as well as outdated hardware is not a good decision in my opinion, except one is jobless or a hobbyist who doesn't have money. That doesn't mean free or cheap software is bad of course but using it where it makes sense but not just based on its price.

    It should be fun if it's a hobby and efficient and possibly an industry standard in the specific line of work for pros.

    I mean 3D creation is already a cheap hobby, most others cost much more money (motor racing, sports clubs, travel, diving, collections of expensive stuff, design cloth etc.). Or generally life with all its pleasures like nice cars, family / kids, going out, good food, house, pets etc.

    I'm technical interested in 3D software, so I don't mind spending a couple of thousands on good software and plugins I like (and use up-to-date hardware).

  8. #38
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    I agree with Marander and Mark, however..at least for me personally...
    Thereīs also an element of pushing your brain to solve a task, which should be of benefit for your brain when solving other tasks, though that element may be in contradiction to what I pointed out about time, and the fastest way of doing an arch..and where I pointed out that some methods would take longer time to do, but this doesnīt necessary have to be in conflict with eachother, it all depends on the situation, if you have the time..you can probably use it to engage your brain with solving those tasks..and hopefully that will be of benefit at other times, if you have a lot more to do with your time..then it would of course be more practical perhaps to buy your time in the sense of getting a tool that can do the job.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by prometheus View Post
    Thereīs also an element of pushing your brain to solve a task, which should be of benefit for your brain when solving other tasks
    Well I do that all the time in my day job, so for me as hobbyist, 3D must be fun. Also a reason I do little coding in 3D apps even if it's easy. However I don't mind complex tasks if its not a tedious workaround for something that can be done much easier in another app or plugin. For a pro that needs to earn money for their time spent, I would assume speed / efficiency is crucial.

  10. #40
    RETROGRADER prometheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marander View Post
    Well I do that all the time in my day job, so for me as hobbyist, 3D must be fun. Also a reason I do little coding in 3D apps even if it's easy. However I don't mind complex tasks if its not a tedious workaround for something that can be done much easier in another app or plugin. For a pro that needs to earn money for their time spent, I would assume speed / efficiency is crucial.
    Solving a specific task in 3d is fun mostly, and stimulating for me anwyay, but it of course can only go so far, in daytimes job not related to 3d, itīs for me often a completely different skillset needed and tasks ahead, so a different brain engagement for sure, where I find it more stimulating and creative to find a solution or workaround in 3D, such as tasks like this.
    But sure..at some point you will most likely run in to situations where your creativity may not be enough, and you may need a special tool for it, wether it is a plugin or simply us another 3D software.

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