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Thread: Home Office rendered in native LW2019

  1. #1

    Home Office rendered in native LW2019

    Here are a couple shots of an upscale traditional home office. Trying a different technique on the one. With the straight on shot I rendered it at a hi-res camera setting with only 1 camera sample, no adaptive sampling, no noise reduction filters and then resizing the image in PS to eliminate the jaggys. It was somewhat successful. For whatever reason LW would crash when rendering at my desired resolution (8192x5456) so I ended up doing two limited region renders (left and right) to get it done. Once the left and right were comped together as one I experimented with various denoisers - Affinity Photo, NIK Dfine but the best result came from just rendering the render in LW with the GPU denoiser - took about 15secs. The two renders took just under 3hrs each. I used more traditional techniques with the perspective shot which took 7hrs and 42min but was half the size (4096x2728) with 8min and 12max adaptive camera samples.
    I think there is some merit to the rendering at the higher res and then reducing - it's faster, but not being able to just do one render is a pain. Overall the LW2012019 render engine is IMO really gorgeous, but could use a speed boost.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Tim Parsons
    Technical Designer
    Sauder Woodworking Co.

    http://www.sauder.com

  2. #2
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    Wow! You are doing great work. That chair looks really uncomfortable though. ;-)

  3. #3
    www.Digitawn.co.uk rustythe1's Avatar
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    Nice renders,
    here is a little trick I taught myself you might want to experiment with, I was doing similar set ups for a whole bunch of bathroom renders, and found that if you remove the two rear walls behind the camera, then use an environment light set to 3.4lx (probably can go lower as the norm would be 1lx for backdrop) and then also the new sunlight to give some nice bright sunlight directed at the windows (obviously not at the open walls!) around 6.1lx, I only needed around 16 gi samples and 12 camera samples and 8 or so on the lights the get very fast clean renders, (put it this way, I set up and rendered 62 bathrooms in 12 hrs so that's around 11 mins set up and rendering each!)
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  4. #4
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    Really gorgeous renders!

    I agree... the LW render engine does produce some beautiful results with the aforementioned caveat that it needs a serious speed boost.

    I did get a little uncanny valley vibe from the plant on the left of the chest in the first image; maybe a little subsurface on the leaves, or perhaps a little less saturation? I dunno.

    BUT again, very beautiful renders!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by wingzeta View Post
    Wow! You are doing great work. That chair looks really uncomfortable though. ;-)
    Thanks. Yeah I'd last about 10min on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by rustythe1 View Post
    Nice renders,
    here is a little trick I taught myself you might want to experiment with, I was doing similar set ups for a whole bunch of bathroom renders, and found that if you remove the two rear walls behind the camera, then use an environment light set to 3.4lx (probably can go lower as the norm would be 1lx for backdrop) and then also the new sunlight to give some nice bright sunlight directed at the windows (obviously not at the open walls!) around 6.1lx, I only needed around 16 gi samples and 12 camera samples and 8 or so on the lights the get very fast clean renders, (put it this way, I set up and rendered 62 bathrooms in 12 hrs so that's around 11 mins set up and rendering each!)
    Typically that is pretty much what I do, but my intent when I started this was to do a 360 render so I had plans to decorate the entire room and additional side rooms. I nixed that idea and never opened up the room. Maybe later I'll come back to it and complete it as a 360.

    Quote Originally Posted by RPSchmidt View Post
    Really gorgeous renders!

    I agree... the LW render engine does produce some beautiful results with the aforementioned caveat that it needs a serious speed boost.

    I did get a little uncanny valley vibe from the plant on the left of the chest in the first image; maybe a little subsurface on the leaves, or perhaps a little less saturation? I dunno.

    BUT again, very beautiful renders!
    Yeah I complete agree with that plant! I found it online and should have spent some time with it. The plants(with the exception of the grass), books and chair are the only objects I acquired all the rest were created my me.
    Thanks for the comments.
    Tim Parsons
    Technical Designer
    Sauder Woodworking Co.

    http://www.sauder.com

  6. #6
    Curmudgeon in Training Ma3rk's Avatar
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    Hey Tim. I have a question & have a fair idea to the answer already. It all looks great but if I was to actually walk into this room, I'd at least need sunglasses if not welders goggles. I know much of this is largely due to client demands & traditionally interior architectural photos have always been a bit over lit.

    Have you experimented with less? I'm coming from 30+ years of motion picture & set lighting.
    "Never be a cat in a cartoon. Never." Chief Wiggum

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma3rk View Post
    Hey Tim. I have a question & have a fair idea to the answer already. It all looks great but if I was to actually walk into this room, I'd at least need sunglasses if not welders goggles. I know much of this is largely due to client demands & traditionally interior architectural photos have always been a bit over lit.

    Have you experimented with less? I'm coming from 30+ years of motion picture & set lighting.
    TBH it's really a personal preference. The final look is derived from various adjustments using a combination of Affinity Photo, PhotoShop and On1 Photo RAW. I've attached a raw render from LW for comparison.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Tim Parsons
    Technical Designer
    Sauder Woodworking Co.

    http://www.sauder.com

  8. #8
    Curmudgeon in Training Ma3rk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Parsons View Post
    TBH it's really a personal preference. The final look is derived from various adjustments using a combination of Affinity Photo, PhotoShop and On1 Photo RAW. I've attached a raw render from LW for comparison.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	EdgeWater_Shot2_RAW_LowRes.jpg 
Views:	44 
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ID:	145376
    Thanks. Ya, it all gets down to how it's going to be used really. You can light the same set for sit-com or drama.

    I tend to go more for the noire direction but something I discovered recently that for me drastically reduced render times. I've a set that's getting some very directional multi sources through a window from an HDR enviro, & then just practicals inside. I was getting hideous render times for mediocre results. As a test, I raised the level of the point lights of the sconces ~ 20% or so. It wasn't as drastic as I thought it would be visually but it cut the render time to ~ 20%. Jaw dropped. I'm likening it to the old technique in the film days of flashing the neg I guess. Digitally, it gives the renderer something to actually work rather than just spin it's gears on nothing. And the rest of the surfaces were looking great too. I could essentially "overlight" & then just bring it down in post; pretty much what's done in normal production.
    "Never be a cat in a cartoon. Never." Chief Wiggum

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