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Thread: Suggest Switch for Buffer memory, QoS and blocking

  1. #1
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    Suggest Switch for Buffer memory, QoS and blocking

    Hi all,
    This is the first time run NDI system on my own media server
    All i need is to capture the screen from 3-4 laptops
    Also i don't need latency or delaying to my system

    I read more articles about the best switches but i need your support to suggest Brand and model to buy please


    I found in the suggestions the switch must be with the zero "Buffer Memory" for zero latency

    Also the switch must have QoS and non-block options

    I don't know if i really need these options or not
    I don't know if i need Managed or unmanaged Switch

    So please suggest Switch model for me
    8 or 16 ports

    Thanks for your support
    Last edited by moha20106; 06-28-2019 at 08:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Typically what is recommended is a full speed backplane switch, also called a 'non-blocking' design. These are switches with enough performance to have all network jacks running at full speed at the same time. For smaller setups nothing else is required.

    A managed switch typically gets you something a bit higher end, but nothing about an 8 channel NDI (or less) makes this a requirement. That being said, I do recommend switches that have some management capabilities because you might need it in the future.

    QoS is not needed and in fact should should be enabled in most cases. You typically will just end up prioritizing other traffic above NDI, which isn't want you want.

    I have a 16 port TP-Link Easy Smart Switch (TL-SG1016DE) that I use for my demo NDI setup. I've run way more than 8 channels of video across it without issue. This is a pretty simple switch, but it does have some basic management capabilities. https://www.tp-link.com/us/business-...-smart-switch/
    Kane Peterson
    Solutions Architect
    NewTek, Inc.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kanep View Post
    Typically what is recommended is a full speed backplane switch, also called a 'non-blocking' design. These are switches with enough performance to have all network jacks running at full speed at the same time. For smaller setups nothing else is required.

    A managed switch typically gets you something a bit higher end, but nothing about an 8 channel NDI (or less) makes this a requirement. That being said, I do recommend switches that have some management capabilities because you might need it in the future.

    QoS is not needed and in fact should should be enabled in most cases. You typically will just end up prioritizing other traffic above NDI, which isn't want you want.

    I have a 16 port TP-Link Easy Smart Switch (TL-SG1016DE) that I use for my demo NDI setup. I've run way more than 8 channels of video across it without issue. This is a pretty simple switch, but it does have some basic management capabilities. https://www.tp-link.com/us/business-...-smart-switch/
    Thanks dear for y support
    In my country Egypt, i found the TL-SG1016D model without the letter (E) in the end
    Do you think it will be without some features you mentioned above?
    If its important features, i can chip one from Amazon
    If not, i can buy it today

    Thanks again for your reply

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by moha20106 View Post
    Thanks dear for y support
    In my country Egypt, i found the TL-SG1016D model without the letter (E) in the end
    Do you think it will be without some features you mentioned above?
    If its important features, i can chip one from Amazon
    If not, i can buy it today

    Thanks again for your reply
    If I had to guess I would think the 'E' stand for English, but I do not know that for sure.
    Kane Peterson
    Solutions Architect
    NewTek, Inc.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kanep View Post
    If I had to guess I would think the 'E' stand for English, but I do not know that for sure.
    The model TL-SG1016D is :
    Transfer Method :Store-and-Forward

    Switching Capacity
    32Gbps
    Packet Forwarding Rate
    23.8Mpps
    MAC Address Table
    8K
    Jumbo Frame
    10KB
    Green Technology
    Yes

    The model TL-SG1016DE is:
    Switching Capacity
    32Gbps
    Packet Forwarding Rate
    23.8Mpps
    MAC Address Table
    8K
    Packet Buffer Memory
    512KB
    Jumbo Frame
    9KB


    Without Transfer Method :Store-and-Forward

    What do you think dear about the store-and-forward option, is it will make latency or delaying?

  6. #6
    I'm not sure what zero buffer memory means exactly. The terms I'm aware in switching are 'store and forward' and 'cut through'. I'm guessing that 'zero buffer' is probably referring to the cut through type.

    Either switch type can work for NDI. For setups with only a few dozen NDI channels, store and forward perfectly fine. If you start getting into a hundred or more NDI channels on your network, then a cut through switch is desired, as these are higher performance switches.

    Store and forward switches makes up the vast majority of network switches on the market, anywhere from very cheap to high end units that cost hundreds to even a few thousand dollars.

    Cut through switches are very expensive, starting prices are many thousands of dollars.

    It sounds like you are trying to transfer 4 channels of NDI from laptops. A cut though switch is not needed for this. You will not see the latency difference of a store and forward switch, we are talking a network delay measured around a dozen microseconds (1 microsecond is one millionth of a second).
    Last edited by kanep; 06-28-2019 at 05:26 PM.
    Kane Peterson
    Solutions Architect
    NewTek, Inc.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kanep View Post
    I'm not sure what zero buffer memory means exactly. The terms I'm aware in switching are 'store and forward' and 'cut through'. I'm guessing that 'zero buffer' is probably referring to the cut through type.

    Either switch type can work for NDI. For setups with only a few dozen NDI channels, store and forward perfectly fine. If you start getting into a hundred or more NDI channels on your network, then a cut through switch is desired, as these are higher performance switches.

    Store and forward switches makes up the vast majority of network switches on the market, anywhere from very cheap to high end units that cost hundreds to even a few thousand dollars.

    Cut through switches are very expensive, starting prices are many thousands of dollars.

    It sounds like you are trying to transfer 4 channels of NDI from laptops. A cut though switch is not needed for this. You will not see the latency difference of a store and forward switch, we are talking a network delay measured around a dozen microseconds (1 microsecond is one millionth of a second).
    Thank you for your reply,
    Could you please check these links for 3 different models
    Which one is good for me with full speed backplane and the features you mentioned above

    https://eu.dlink.com/uk/en/products/...gigabit-switch

    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/suppor...tch/model.html

    https://www.linksys.com/us/p/P-LGS10

    hanks dear for your support

  8. #8
    I've never used any of those models, but I don't see any reason why they wouldn't work for your needs.
    Kane Peterson
    Solutions Architect
    NewTek, Inc.

  9. #9
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    Thanks dear for your support and help ��

  10. #10
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    There's a whole lot of overthinking going on about switches with buffering. A SWITCH typically cannot substantively delay an NDI signal.

    A very poorly configured ROUTER may introduce delay as a result of the phenomenon known as "buffer bloat." This is about poorly conceived QoS mechanisms.

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