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Thread: Dual Networks for NDI

  1. #1
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    Dual Networks for NDI

    Hello,

    I'm having issues while having 2 separate networks running at once. The NDI content needs to be on Network 1 (all local NDI feeds via a un-managed 10G switch). Network 2 has internet and internal OSC messaging. On the forums here I read about blocking port 5353, mDNS, Bonjour, 5960+n feeds/computer on the second network. This works well because that network is connected to a router, and can be blocked easily enough with Windows Firewall settings on each device. Well, I suppose in theory, but it doesn't seem to work. Is it possible that these devices could not be going through this firewall because they are connected through the same switch?

    I've also tested using the Access Manager and read the .pdf that came with the tools. I tried working with the remote sources tab (despite the manual saying it can flip flop between networks). I am not sure how the Remote Sources has an effect on the incoming streams. When I add a 'Receive Group' that does not exist and add IP addresses to the 'Remote Sources,' no streams actually come through.

    Any help at all would be much appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Tegan

  2. #2
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    Should anyone else have the same issue: Fortunately all my devices were receiving into the same 2 computers. On those 2 devices, I have a bash script run at start-up that disables the other NICs that I did not want the feeds going through for one minute and then re-enables them. This seems to be enough time for all the other devices to jump to the desired network. Once they are on the desired network they stay there. This isn't a pretty solution by any means and doesn't work for any other streams joining the system after this process is done.

  3. #3
    Registered User roddyp's Avatar
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    You might want to consider using Multicasting for the sources...?

    With multicast, data is only sent to the 'default' NIC in a system. (i.e. the one showing first when you run 'ipconfig' from command line). You can adjust which NIC is considered default by fiddling with the TCP/IP advance properties 'metrics' values in Windows 10.

    In systems with multiple NICs this multicast behaviour can often be a pain, because the sources can be "found" via bonjour on all other NICs, but the video data only gets sent to the default one. For you it could be useful. The usual caveats about switches with IGMP capabilities and the possibility of swamping your network apply, so do tread carefully!

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