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Thread: Swipe the Cheese! - Made with Lightwave

  1. #1
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    Swipe the Cheese! - Made with Lightwave

    I'm very happy to announce the release of Swipe the Cheese!
    So much delicious cheese! Solve over 100 challenging puzzle mazes to collect all the cheese morsels. But watch out! Dangerous traps, shifting walls and rolling spikes stand between you and the golden delicacy.

    iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/swip...7673?ls=1&mt=8
    Android: Pending
    Website: http://www.stageoneone.com/swipethecheese










  2. #2
    Looks fun. Are all the assets made in LightWave?
    My opinions and comments do not represent those of my employer.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ernpchan View Post
    Looks fun. Are all the assets made in LightWave?
    Yes, all of the 3D art was done exclusively with lightwave.

    Update
    Android version is live: http://www.amazon.com/Stage-1-1-Game...ipe+the+Cheese

  4. #4
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    It's nicely done.

    The detailed plate highlights the scale contradiction. Maybe a plain wooden cheese board might have been better?

    Now, as an iPhone/iPad developer there is something I hated instantly - the TINY panel with TINY buttons that pops up when you complete a layer. It should be much bigger. I think the buttons and panels are generally too small for the iPad form factor. The actual game area is fine.

    I see you put a gradient on the play button text, but abandoned that for all the other buttons.

    I assume you're rendering image sequences made by LW.

    I like it but the proposition of sliding plates seemed very odd at first. If it was tilting game it would have been natural.

    I hope it makes a bit of money for you!

    Maybe if you did a 'making of' Newtek will boost your publicity with a mention?

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the feedback pauland, I will takes these points under consideration. A "making of" article might be fun, I'll give that some thought as well.

  6. #6
    INSPIRATIONAL how did you get into app making? any tips for people wanting to make apps with lighwave?

  7. #7
    Man of many cells. shrox's Avatar
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    I think it looks fine as it is.
    shrox www.shrox.com
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by shrox View Post
    I think it looks fine as it is.
    Thanks!




    Quote Originally Posted by vonpietro View Post
    INSPIRATIONAL how did you get into app making? any tips for people wanting to make apps with lighwave?
    Thanks! I moved over into the game industry almost 10 years ago. My first professional role in this field was developing games for the cell phone market, back before ios, android and the app stores were even around. I started building my own games on the side mainly for fun and to constantly push my skills in all areas of development.

    If you are looking to get into app development, now is a fantastic time to do so. There are so many avenues to get into the market, but thatís also a double-edged sword.

    PROS
    Reward:
    The feeling of shipping a product is incredibly rewarding. The sense of accomplishment is a great high.

    Payout:
    It can be a source of income. If you can get your game into a new space, show a unique twist or have a product that takes off the returns can be significant.

    Ownership:
    At the end of the day this is your product. That is a tremendous feeling of pride. It also means youíve got free reign to try whatever you want and experiment with new ideas. Thereís a complete sense of freedom.


    CONS
    Flooded Markets:
    Because the ease of access, thereís a huge number of apps released every single day. This can make standing out very difficult.

    Competition:
    As an indie developer you are going to be competing in the same space as the big name developers with massive budgets. Youíll also be competing against a massive number of other indie developers like yourself all after the same market. Youíll be up against some incredibly stiff competition.

    Workload:
    Developing a game or app from idea to market delivery is an enormous investment of both time and work. This is especially true if you are doing it completely solo and even more so if you are doing it on the side. Expect a lot of sleepless nights and full weekends of development. Pushing out a small game can easily be months of work even with a 2-4 person team. Going completely solo makes it even harder.

    Profit Margins:
    Because the market is so saturated, being able to turn a profit is extremely difficult. Some developers release products and never see a dime. If you get into it with the sole purpose of making money, you will be disappointed more often than not.



    How to get Started:
    If you are interested in getting started, thereís several options open. I wonít touch on them all, but Iíll cover what I use:

    SOFTWARE
    Unity 3D [ http://unity3d.com ]
    This is by far my favorite game engine. The support and community are excellent and best of all you can get a completely free version that gives you the ability to build and deploy games for PC/Mac, Web, Android and iOS without any additional costs. It runs of both Windows and Mac. The only caveat is that if you plan to deploy to iOS, you will need a Mac. Both platforms can export to everything else.

    Unity supports code written in Boo, Javascript and C#. Javascript and C# are the two most used solutions, but I would highly recommend using C#. While there are tools out there to help with some of the code task, knowing how to actually code is invaluable.

    Adobe Creative Suite [ http://www.adobe.com ]
    Photoshop and Illustrator are the two biggest tools here that I use. They handle all the texturing, art and general illustration or layout work that is required. Dreamweaver comes in handy for managing the website and in some cases posting builds.

    Lightwave [ https://www.lightwave3d.com ]
    For all my game assets, Lightwave is my go to tool. All of the models, uv mapping and animations are done here. Everything is imported to unity from Layout.

    LICENSES
    Depending on where you want to deploy you game, youíll need developer accounts for the platforms.

    iOS/Mac:
    Each platform, either iOS or Mac Desktops, require a $100/year license fee to set up a developer account. Approvals once you game is shipped/submitted takes anywhere from a couple of days to a week or more to show up in store. This store is very tightly controlled. In my personally experience, sales on iOS have been far better than any other platform.

    Google Play:
    Google Play currently requires a one-time $25 developer fee to set up a distribution account. There is no approval process and once your game is submitted it will generally show up within a few hours. The google play store is much less controlled. So far sales on google play have been good, a bit behind iOS but still well worth it.

    Amazon:
    The developer account for Amazon is currently free. Their platform is much newer and hasnít got quite the market penetration that Apple or Google does yet. Like iOS, the Amazon store has an approval process. I havenít had a ton of experience on this market yet, but so far submissions have been approved and available within about a day. Their store front is not as nice as Google or iOS so app discovery is quite a bit harder, but they do offer an free marketing package if you meet certain requirements.



    Final Thoughts
    The biggest piece of advice I can give is to make games because you are passionate about it, not because itís a path to get rich quick. Donít be afraid to make the games you want to make and donít try to follow the market. Most importantly, enjoy it!

  9. #9
    Registered User Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Interesting! Thanks for the info pixelzero!

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