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Thread: How to make Flat Roof Trim

  1. #1
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    How to make Flat Roof Trim

    I am trying to model this building, but I can't figure out how this type of roof trim was put together, and how to reproduce it. Specifically I am having trouble with those things that stick up, and then kind of fold over. I've done a bit of searching, and I can't find this particular type of roof trim anywhere!

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/129806...4/15938821472/

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/129806...4/15939479765/

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/129806...n/photostream/

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/129806...n/photostream/

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    It looks like bent metal. You could build this with the box tool and beveling out polygons.
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  3. #3
    see if this quick video I did will help you out. http://youtu.be/m5c6hYvUw_U

  4. #4
    Registered User RonGC's Avatar
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    Metal flashing for buildings is often field fitted on site depending on how it fits the structure. All flashings come in various sizes but quite often you need to custom size, hand bend pieces.

    Also the architect designer may have come up with a design for aesthetics that is not made by manufacturer and the cladding installers have to custom bend the flashings to achieve the designers vision/look. So if you have reference pics or can get out and have a look yourself at the flashing/trim then modelling is fairly straight forward, if you can't get great refs then model to approximate the look.

    Used to work with cladding, structural and welding as a union ironworker years ago before i retired. A lot of work is modified on site, notated as field fitted on the blueprints for the project, meaning its up to the worker to make it work LOL.

    So if its custom you may never find another example of this anywhere else.

    Best of luck,

    Ron

  5. #5
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    tonyrizo2003
    see if this quick video I did will help you out. http://youtu.be/m5c6hYvUw_U
    Thanks for the video!


    PMRonGC
    Metal flashing for buildings is often field fitted on site depending on how it fits the structure. All flashings come in various sizes but quite often you need to custom size, hand bend pieces.

    Also the architect designer may have come up with a design for aesthetics that is not made by manufacturer and the cladding installers have to custom bend the flashings to achieve the designers vision/look. So if you have reference pics or can get out and have a look yourself at the flashing/trim then modelling is fairly straight forward, if you can't get great refs then model to approximate the look.

    Used to work with cladding, structural and welding as a union ironworker years ago before i retired. A lot of work is modified on site, notated as field fitted on the blueprints for the project, meaning its up to the worker to make it work LOL.

    So if its custom you may never find another example of this anywhere else.

    Best of luck,

    Ron
    Do you know of a diagram or video that shows the process of folding a similar metal flashing (specifically the part that sticks up)? I found one of metal flashing being installed on a corner, but it does not have the part that sticks up.

    Does that part have a purpose? Is it excess metal that was not cut out, or is it just for aesthetics?

    I took the reference photos myself, but could not get on the roof to take a close look at the folded metal.

    Also do you know why the piece on the corner doesn't seem to be folded as neatly? It looks kind of crumpled compared to the others.


    Thanks to everyone for the help so far!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by RonGC View Post
    Used to work with cladding, structural and welding as a union ironworker years ago before i retired. A lot of work is modified on site, notated as field fitted on the blueprints for the project, meaning its up to the worker to make it work LOL.

    Ron
    Local 97?

    I was 720 for 15 years....

  7. #7
    it's a manhole cover ↓ JoePoe's Avatar
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    I believe those elements are called Standing Seams.
    Search for that.... first one I found https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCUJVR8Sbl0
    Basically two pieces of flashing (or copper/metal roofing.... what have you) meet. At that meeting they both go vertical forming back to back L shapes.
    One is taller than the other and folded over the top of the shorter one and hammered/crimped tight. An additional locking fold can be done and/or corners can be folded over (that's the dog eared look you've got in your photos... along with some sloppy hammering ).
    Seams can also be soldered.

    Another one
    Last edited by JoePoe; 12-05-2014 at 12:34 PM.
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  8. #8
    Registered User RonGC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePoe View Post
    I believe those elements are called Standing Seams.
    Search for that.... first one I found https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCUJVR8Sbl0
    Basically two pieces of flashing (or copper/metal roofing.... what have you) meet. At that meeting they both go vertical forming back to back L shapes.
    One is taller than the other and folded over the top of the shorter one and hammered/crimped tight. An additional locking fold can be done and/or corners can be folded over (that's the dog eared look you've got in your photos... along with some sloppy hammering ).
    Seams can also be soldered.

    Another one
    Absolutely correct,

    Standing seams are used on roof panels all the time to prevent water penetration. In your example photos the folded corners stop water from entering from the ends.

    Years ago all seams were lead soldered but nowadays most cladders use construction glue applied with a Caulking gun to bond the overlapping seams of flat overlapping flashing. It is faster to join metal and warrantable for 60 years the life span of the cladding. Self sealing Screws are also used to attach the flashing to the structure usually with a double row of construction glue between the overlapping pieces to guarantee no water penetration.

    This glue is so strong that once cured it is a lot of hard work to separate the pieces and so is often not used on residential if there is need for often doing repairs or re-roofing, as it is much easier to separate the pieces if hand folded standing seams are done.

    So it is up to you if you want add the standing seams to your model or not, both are viable and in use methods.

    Hope this helps,

    Ron

  9. #9
    Registered User RonGC's Avatar
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    Not local 97, i was 720 Edmonton as well. I just live in BC is all LOL, retired for quite a few years now.

    Every once in a while i really miss the trade, just not the way projects are handled now.

    Ron

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by RonGC View Post
    Not local 97, i was 720 Edmonton as well. I just live in BC is all LOL, retired for quite a few years now.

    Every once in a while i really miss the trade, just not the way projects are handled now.

    Ron
    Its a gong show nowadays.....

    It had its moments though. I wonder if we worked together.....you probably worked with my uncles/grandpa...McCullough's
    Last edited by m.d.; 12-05-2014 at 03:16 PM.

  11. #11
    Creator of the Grid
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    Wow! Thanks everyone for all the help!

    JoePoe and Ron, your insight is really helpful!


    If anyone is interested, I will be starting a thread about this project in the lightwave gallery work in progress section.

  12. #12

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