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Thread: Lightwave to use Nvidia Quadro k1100m on Lenovo laptop with intel gfx

  1. #1

    Lightwave to use Nvidia Quadro k1100m on Lenovo laptop with intel gfx

    Hi
    I got a Lenovo laptop (w540) and want to use LW on that (11.6.3)
    This machine has integrated graphics on the Intel CPU and a Nvidia Quadro K1100m but as far as i can tell LW does not switch to the Nvidia Quadro.
    I have set the nvidia settings to start with Layout and Modeler exe's.
    My problem is i do not see very good perfomance so i expect LW is still running on the intel chip and i cannot tell if it uses the quadro at all.
    Or it could be worst case scenario, the quadro board is just not as great as i expect? I tried with a human figure with 850k subpatched polys.
    I get better result on my 2nd gen i7 workstation with a geforce 660

    Something i am missing here ?

    thanks for any help

    Jeremy

  2. #2
    Registered User cyroz's Avatar
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    I'm afraid the K1100m is not just as great as you expected....
    The k1100m is base on the GK107 processor (1300 millions of transistors) wich delivers between 336 GFLOPS (geforce GT630) and 730 GFLPOS -gt640)
    The GTX660 (no Ti) is based counts almost the double of transistors(2540) and delivers around 1900-2000 GFLOPS...

    As a side note, Lightwave never took advantage of quadro.... (k4000 k5000 seem to be exceptions....)

  3. #3
    ex-LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    If your laptop uses the Optimus system to switch between onboard and NVidia graphics you need to do two things - turn on the display in the notification area for which processor is being used (it shows grey when you are using onboard graphics and coloured/green when using NVidia) and in the settings for Optimus you can say which processor to use for specific applications. TBH, I found the whole thing a pain and just switched everything to NVidia. I know that using the onboard graphics would be okay for word processing and web use and use less battery, but what did I buy the laptop for? Was it web browsing and word processing? No.

    HTH

    B
    Ben Vost
    LightWave 3D Docs wiki
    AMD Threadripper 1950X, Windows 10 Pro 64-bit, 32GB RAM, nVidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti (4GB and 768 CUDA cores) and GTX 1080 (8GB and 2560 CUDA cores) driver version 456.71, 2x4K 23.5" monitors
    Dell Server, Windows 10 Pro, Intel Xeon E3-1220 @3.10 GHz, 8 GB RAM, Quadro K620
    Laptop with Intel i7, nVidia Quadro 2000Mw/ 2GB (377.83 and 192 CUDA cores), Windows 10 Professional 64-bit, 8GB RAM
    Mac Mini 2.26 GHz Core 2 Duo, 4 GB RAM, 10.10.3

  4. #4
    thanks for the very helpful and detailed answer. Seems i got a very powerful Candy Crush machine on my hands

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thanks. I did that but the low performance made me think i did not work.

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeVee View Post
    If your laptop uses the Optimus system to switch between onboard and NVidia graphics you need to do two things - turn on the display in the notification area for which processor is being used (it shows grey when you are using onboard graphics and coloured/green when using NVidia) and in the settings for Optimus you can say which processor to use for specific applications. TBH, I found the whole thing a pain and just switched everything to NVidia. I know that using the onboard graphics would be okay for word processing and web use and use less battery, but what did I buy the laptop for? Was it web browsing and word processing? No.

    HTH

    B

  5. #5
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    I'm still using my thinkpad W700 with Quadro FX 3700M and if I had to guess it's the worst case scenario. I suspect you might be another victim of nvidia's "professional workstation solution" marketing and had unrealistic expectations in regards to the performance of the card, which irl depends entirely on application and tasks. Best thing you can do in these cases is find an owner who is kind enough to run some tests before you buy it. In my limited experience Quadro cards are often grossly overpriced in terms of what they offer and especially mobile versions aren't really worth it. Consider this, my Quadro recently had a stroke and Lenovo asks 3000 $ for a replacement. This is a 6 year old card. I was able to have it resurrected with a heat gun but I've learned my lesson. Also I would stay away from expensive laptops unless you are always on the move or loaded with dough, once the warranty is gone you're up **** creek if something happens. Oh and make sure to open it up every 6 months or so and clean it with compressed air, dust usually builds up real fast. For rendering you will want to keep an eye on temps to avoid shut-downs, even on new laptops there can be problems due to god awful thermal paste applications. By the way you might want to read this W540 thread.
    Last edited by sampei; 07-17-2014 at 06:38 AM.

  6. #6
    ex-LightWave documentation BeeVee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremydk View Post
    thanks for the very helpful and detailed answer. Seems i got a very powerful Candy Crush machine on my hands

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thanks. I did that but the low performance made me think i did not work.
    Do you see a multicoloured icon in your status bar? If you hover over it, or click perhaps, it should show what apps are using the nvidia processor. It's also worth noting that you will probably want to make changes to LightWave's own options to gain the most, but as the original responder said, LightWave doesn't take much advantage of high-end graphics hardware. In LightWave options in Layout and Modeler, make sure "GLSL" is chosen over "Multitexture" as the Shading method and check that "Buffered (VBO)" is chosen for Geometry acceleration (it should already be).

    B
    Ben Vost
    LightWave 3D Docs wiki
    AMD Threadripper 1950X, Windows 10 Pro 64-bit, 32GB RAM, nVidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti (4GB and 768 CUDA cores) and GTX 1080 (8GB and 2560 CUDA cores) driver version 456.71, 2x4K 23.5" monitors
    Dell Server, Windows 10 Pro, Intel Xeon E3-1220 @3.10 GHz, 8 GB RAM, Quadro K620
    Laptop with Intel i7, nVidia Quadro 2000Mw/ 2GB (377.83 and 192 CUDA cores), Windows 10 Professional 64-bit, 8GB RAM
    Mac Mini 2.26 GHz Core 2 Duo, 4 GB RAM, 10.10.3

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