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Thread: (IKBooster)Problem occurs when increacing FPS.

  1. #1
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    (IKBooster)Problem occurs when increacing FPS.

    I've made a very short character animation,which the character lie down on the bed.
    I wanted to LOCK his foot while doing this. So I used Fix-Bake keys and Bind motion on the foot. The result was good enough. His foot was planted in the floor perfectly. But when I increased FPS from 15 to 30, his foot had vibrated!

    Why this happens? And any solution exists?
    I tried to use PitchCorrection Scan,but it didn't work well.

    Please give me some advises

    thx.

  2. #2
    Goes bump in the night RebelHill's Avatar
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    It happens because you baked at 15fps, then went up to 30, leaving interpolation points... You should always work at your final intended framerate.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by RebelHill View Post
    It happens because you baked at 15fps, then went up to 30, leaving interpolation points... You should always work at your final intended framerate.
    I disagree. The same rules do not apply to animation workflows in a part time IK system.

    Here's why:



    Quote Originally Posted by kei_ch View Post
    Why this happens? And any solution exists?
    You should be able to just re-bake the feet and be fine. Understand that IKBooster is a part-time IK system, so when you double the number of keyframes, you are doubling the spacing between those keyframes and are allowing TCB interpolation to wiggle the items around. Because the feet are the only issue here, you shouldn't have to re-bind stuff. This shouldn't be an issue in most cases however; your example involves movements with a lot of leg bending near range-of-motion extremes, so that's why you get noticeable jittering or movement when upping the FPS. Most of the time, baking of the feet involves the character standing or squatting upright... so doubling the FPS should not require any re-baking at all typically. Notice at the end of the video clip above that the feet baked at 15 FPS look exactly the same as the FPS-changed feet animating at 30 fps.

    Quick note on bakespots: If you used bakespots and have autobind on, understand that bakespots do not get updated with the FPS setting. You have to remove them if you want to work at a different FPS than when you set the bakespot. I'd love to see a change that updates the bakespots with FPS changes in a future version of lightwave.
    Last edited by Ryan Roye; 05-22-2014 at 07:18 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RebelHill View Post
    It happens because you baked at 15fps, then went up to 30, leaving interpolation points... You should always work at your final intended framerate.
    Thank you and you're right.
    I think there are two choices about animating.
    One is always work at final intended framerate, the other one is animating at low framerate first, the increase FPS.
    In this case, I use IKBooster so I want to animate as low FPS as possible.
    But you always tell me the principles of 3DCG animation. So Thank you very much!

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazriker View Post
    I disagree. The same rules do not apply to animation workflows in a part time IK system.

    Here's why:

    You should be able to just re-bake the feet and be fine. Understand that IKBooster is a part-time IK system, so when you double the number of keyframes, you are doubling the spacing between those keyframes and are allowing TCB interpolation to wiggle the items around. Because the feet are the only issue here, you shouldn't have to re-bind stuff. This shouldn't be an issue in most cases however; your example involves movements with a lot of leg bending near range-of-motion extremes, so that's why you get noticeable jittering or movement when upping the FPS. Most of the time, baking of the feet involves the character standing or squatting upright... so doubling the FPS should not require any re-baking at all typically. Notice at the end of the video clip above that the feet baked at 15 FPS look exactly the same as the FPS-changed feet animating at 30 fps.

    Quick note on bakespots: If you used bakespots and have autobind on, understand that bakespots do not get updated with the FPS setting. You have to remove them if you want to work at a different FPS than when you set the bakespot. I'd love to see a change that updates the bakespots with FPS changes in a future version of lightwave.
    Thank you as always Ryan.
    Re-baking after double keyframes works perfectly
    I've watched the video clip above in IKBCG part2, and noticed that the feet baked at 15 FPS moves slightly.
    I wanted to ELIMINATE the vibration of the feet though, what you say(This shouldn't be an issue in most cases) is really true.
    This is the RARE case, because there are many other motions which do not involve movements with a lot of leg bending near range-of-motion extremes.
    Although this is an issue as to whether or not to pursue quality, Do you usually let the feet slight movement go in your production?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by kei_ch View Post
    Do you usually let the feet slight movement go in your production?
    In my typical productions, no, as I'm usually producing content that lies between 15-20 FPS. When a client wants something produced at 20+ FPS, I still animate at 12-15 (important that it is exactly half the original to avoid fractional keys), then change the FPS when the animation is completed. Unless the camera is doing extreme closeups on the feet, no baking is typically required for solid foot placement after changing the FPS upward. Any TCB movement is usually pixel-length at most.
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  7. #7
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    Thank you Ryan.
    I decide to animate at 12 FPS because many 3DCG animations are made at 24(twice 12)
    Especially, Japanese 2D animation consists of just 8 FPS. "FREEDOM",which is a Japanese 3DCG animation that totally made by LightWave, is 12 FPS.
    I'd read the interview, they said 12 FPS is good idea to animate as Japanimation style. It is more controllable dynamically than animate at 20+ FPS.

    Quote Originally Posted by chazriker View Post
    Unless the camera is doing extreme closeups on the feet, no baking is typically required for solid foot placement after changing the FPS upward. Any TCB movement is usually pixel-length at most.
    I understand.
    It is important more of making the animation better than being distracted by little things.
    I love IKBooster Style animating because it is quite intuitive.
    I've watched Larry's tutorial sesseion in LW users group, which title is "Save time using IK Booster with Lighwave 11 to assemble a 3-D human figure.", and I really like his style, Pose to Pose animation.
    Last edited by kei_ch; 05-23-2014 at 04:26 AM.

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