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Thread: New machine - Reinstalling SE2+

  1. #1
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    New machine - Reinstalling SE2+

    I bought SE2 in 02/2010, and downloaded onto my old machine (HP XW8200) which also had VT5 and SE1+.

    Now that XP is no longer being supported, I've gone to a newer, faster machine (Windows 7 Pro) but am not sure the procedure for reinstalling SE2+.

    Qx#1: To reinstall SE2+, is it as simple as downloading the default SE2.1 onto the new computer, and downloading the latest update SE2.6.1? Then adding the product code/Licence Key?

    Qx #2: Alternatively, for convenience of mobility, I'm considering reinstalling the SE2+ onto my laptop (Windows 7 HE). Would there be any real negatives to doing this?

    I'm a hobbyist and occasional user.

    Thanx in advance.

  2. #2
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    Hi George,

    If you have a NewTek customer account, you shouldn't need to download SE2.1. You can download the latest version, then do a clean install on your computer and then register it accordingly. The only thing to be aware of is that the download version of any SE 2.x.x does not include all of the DVEs, transitions and effects. These are only available from the DVD versions.

    So if you need to preserve these files, you'll need to reinstall your current version of SE from the DVD onto your new computer, then install the latest downloaded version of SE over it. If memory serves, during the installation process, the installer will either ask you first or automatically remove the older version and replace it with the newer version.

    Regarding your second question, the only limitation I can see is more to do with the possibility of connecting your laptop to some third party hardware (such as the Blackmagic Intensity Pro). Since your laptop doesn't have spare PCI slots, expandability can be a little limited.

    As an occasional, user I'd be surprised if this was a concern to you, but other than that, I wouldn't say that SE on a laptop gives any more limititations than a tower based PC. I use SE exclusively on a laptop and it works very well for me.

    If you were a power user, then for technical reasons that have nothing to do with SpeedEDIT, an Intel based tower PC would be a better choice, since the component choices for those are superior to laptop components.

    Hope this helps,

    Shabazzy

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    Good advice all around, and much appreciated.

    In 2010, when I purchased my SE2, it was downloaded from Newtek, and the DVD option may not have been available. That said, for what I've used SE2+ for, I'm not sure I've needed everything on the DVD.

    Sincere regrards,
    George

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    No problem George, but just to note, you could still install SE 1.x from the DVD onto your system and then upgrade to the latest SE 2.x and still preserve your DVEs etc.

    In my experience the policy of "having it but not needing it" is better than the "needing it but not having it" policy.

    Shabazzy

  5. #5
    I want to put SE 1.0 on a windoes 8.1 HP Phoenix desktop, then upgrade to the last SE 1.xx. Is this going to work?
    Don at VISIONaerie.com
    "What the world needs is more geniuses with humility, there are so few of us left." -- Oscar Levant

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    Well, this an excellent question and my experience has not been a positive one.

    I recently upgraded my laptop to a Core i7, Win 8.1 custom build laptop and installed the latest version of SE. This has proven to be very unstable and crashes as soon as I put any clips on the timeline. So I went back to SE 2.5.5 which, although slightly more stable, was still prone to crashing. I tried running it in both Win 7 and Vista compatibility mode with better results but it still crashes after a while.

    Technically NT don't support Windows 8 for SE but AFAIK they've not experienced the problems I have, but in my opinion I wouldn't rely on a Win 8.x or higher machine running SE 1.x.

    Right now I've had to ditch SE in favor of LightWorks, which I'm having to learn from scratch.

  7. #7
    Lynn Cress lcress's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shabazzy View Post
    Right now I've had to ditch SE in favor of LightWorks, which I'm having to learn from scratch.
    Wow. Sorry to hear you've abandoned SE, Shabazzy. That doesn't bode well for the rest of us.

    I keep telling people that SE isn't dead, but rather that NT is concentrating on LW and Tricaster as their frontline products. I've been hoping they'll get back to SE at some point. But, I guess the handwriting on the wall has been there for some time now.

    I'm still on Win 7/64bit. Good to know I need to stay on Win 7 to run SE even if I upgrade my computer (which I plan to do this coming year).

    (Sorry to hijack the thread)

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    Yeah, it wasn't an easy decision for me. But I really needed to upgrade my machine 1) to improve my workflow and 2) the old laptop's display was dying.

    Had I known about the OS issue, I might have chosen Win 7, but thinking about it now, I have a tendency to be a late adopter of the latest technology (it's the 'if it ain't broke why fix it' mentality I have) and sometimes that can prove to work out more expensive in time when you have to figure out workarounds to some technical problems.

    So this time I thought I'd do things differently, and now I remember why I have that mentality.

    I admit, I was MAJORLY disappointed when this happened, because as most of you know, I'm pretty loyal to NT and SE so having to accept that SE wasn't going to work on the latest technology out there was a very hard pill to swallow.

    But, since I'm not one to tilt at windmills and complain about the situation, I just had to do what was right for my business and adapt to survive.

    My fear for the future is that at some point, the old Windows OS's will become obsolete and SpeedEDIT will be stuck in time with them. I would hate for SE standalone to become like, Aura, VT, 3D Arsenal, Inspire 3D, etc but based on this experience it's seeming more and more likely given how long Win 8's been out and the time NT's had to get SE compatible with it.

    That said, I'll still be frequenting these forums and lending support where I can albeit from my new position of 'not a frequent user'.

  9. #9
    Registered User donx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shabazzy View Post
    My fear for the future is that at some point, the old Windows OS's will become obsolete and SpeedEDIT will be stuck in time with them. I would hate for SE standalone to become like, Aura, VT, 3D Arsenal, Inspire 3D, etc but based on this experience it's seeming more and more likely given how long Win 8's been out and the time NT's had to get SE compatible with it.
    Ah, but just as newer technology comes along, so does the used price of older computers drop. Having a workstation tucked into the control room, that just handles SE under Win7 is an inexpensive and viable option.
    I am still using antiquated software under Win2k on my very old production computer. Right now I have 5 computers, each for different uses.

  10. #10
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    Lotta desk (and room) real estate.

    I've been spoilt by the Amiga and it's multitasking versatility, so I was never really happy with the idea of multiple computers for for multiple tasks.

    But whatever works, right?

  11. #11
    Shavazzy, let us know how it goes with Lightworks. I tried learning it but gave up after a month of total frustration. About the same time, I got a free copy of Sony Vegas 12 with my camcorder and learned it very quickly. Along with Vegas, I installed and now run SE and VT5 without any problems on my upgraded workstation running Win7 64-bit. Since Lightworks must be purchased to get the full benefits of the software and has that steep learning curve, I'm sticking with SE, Vegas 13, Hitfilm 3 Ultimate, Sound Forge Pro, and the free copies of Resolve and Fusion I also installed. You'll find that the people and users at Lightworks are incredibly helpful. I so hoped their software worked for me, but it's way beyond anything I'll ever need for my work. It's a great piece of software, but the time I spent trying to learn it just wasn't worth it.

  12. #12
    Vegas, hitfilm, premiere, and FCP are all easy to learn if you know SE (You'll miss the speed tho.) Avid, Resolve, Fusion are not as easy. Dunno about Lightworks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dweinkauf View Post
    Shavazzy, let us know how it goes with Lightworks.
    Well, so far I spent last week learning it's workflow and now have a grasp on it's methodology. It's VERY different from the SE way of doing things but I've found that once you get your head around it's system, you can start to see the benefits of doing things their way.

    The most notible one is in edit management. With SpeedEDIT if you're doing an edit that has multiple scenes or even a project with 2 or 3 units, like on a film shot in two or three different locations and directed by two or three different directors. With SE you'd have to edit each unit/scene in their own separate projects, then once completed, cut each one from the timeline of their respective project and paste them into the newly created 'master project' timeline. This is messy and makes it easy to lose track of things. Although on saying that, you could just make a sub-project of each unit's edit and drag it into a folder in the Add Media window, then drag each sub-folder into the final project, and hope it doesn't crash the system (yes, I've been experiencing a lot of that lately with SE).

    LightWorks allows you to have multiple edits in one project, so you could have your project named something like 'Star Wars: The Forced Awakening' and then create a 'Unit 1' edit, 'Unit 2' edit, etc, all within the same project. Then when you're finished, you can create a 'Final' edit and drop the unit edit's into it. One project, multiple edits, easy management.

    This is useful when it comes to keeping track of the work done in the project (what comes from where, etc). I can see why they say it's used in Hollywood. It's very much geared for that type of workflow.

    As an editor, I have to say, it sometimes feels very clunky when compared to SpeedEDIT, but I reckon that's just because I've been using SpeedEDIT for so long and am a bit resistant to change. But I can see it's potential.

    When I got the free edition, I was offered a discount of 30% off the 1 year licence, so I decided to purchase it for £69 + VAT instead of £99 + VAT. So far I think it's been good value for money.

    The one thing I really don't like is how you're educated on using the software. I'm a 'RTFM' kind of guy, and like a comprehensive document that sets out all the features of a technology. I DO NOT like the 'click it and see' approach or the 'show me what to do' approach and Red Shark have opted for a minimalist manual, supported by training videos. As a result there are many gaps in what certain features do and why they are there and that really frustrates me.

    If you want me to use your product, give me what I need to learn it, right?

    It's early days yet, but so far I feel very productive with the new computer, new editor, 64bit, 8 core goodness speeding up my work rate and stability (finally). At the moment, things are moving in the right direction productivity wise. But I must say that I do feel a bit peed that I can't use SE anymore with the new technology. I hope they make that right soon.

  14. #14
    I went through a lot of the things you're experiencing with Lightworks. Like you, I disliked the "click it and see" approach. I kept trying to align it with my way of working with SE and realized that approach didn't work. As I said it's a great program but one that's a lot more than I need for my work. Keep us informed about your progress with the software.

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