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Thread: Structural Steel

  1. #1
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Structural Steel

    Stadium:
    Cleaning & rendering the cobwebs on my hard drives. . . . . have a number of structural steel models, mostly modeled by myself . . . . intend to post more of them on this thread.

    In this case the models (two of them) were by others.

    Criticisms are welcome, but I might apply them to other renders, hopefully, to be added to this thread.
    Am tired of messing with this one.
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  2. #2
    Kamehameha Chameleon BigHache's Avatar
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    I like it. Looks like a lot of work, but fun. Looking forward to more.

  3. #3
    nice job Riff...

    as a former 12 year Ironworker I have a sentimental spot for this kinda stuff

  4. #4
    It's looking very elaborate!
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  5. #5
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Shoring

    I considered not posting this 'hole in the ground' because its a temporary 'butt ugly' structure and the building, once built, would be just so-so.

    On the other hand, the use of LightWave, in its design was ,for me, extensive. A process, I think, worth trying to describe.

    Rendered Image: Construction Tale: Consider the teamwork: a small group of people, maybe five or six, were tasked with designing a structure that would prevent the sides (perimeter) of the excavation, the hole in the ground, from collapsing . I was a member of that group.

    Construction sequence: Demolish two adjacent older buildings fronting on a busy city steet. But keep the hole where the below ground parking garage used to be. Then build a new four level concrete parking garage up to street and proceed with structural concrete ten or fifteen storys high. Per the architect's design. The shoring design and execution is not the resposibility of the archs. But they do watch, and can crit every step of the way.

    The problem, and it was a big one, is that the temp bracing cannot interfere with (columns, footers and beams) both the old and new garages. Tie-backs would have been the solution, but they couldn't be used here. In LightWave I modeled both buildings and the bracing (shoring). Design not by myself. Then I told the group about interferences and . . . created a new bracing model by moving stuff around. A PE (professional engineer) would check 'me' out. Many models, many changes. If you get the idea, it was a tuff nut to crack. The group looked at my models, live in modeler; but didn't look at the software I was using (LightWave).

    Photograph: PP-24 (Post Piles 2' Diameter) being assembled for welding. These must be installed before the old four level parking garage can be demolished. The Party Chief (surveyor) asked that I provide two points (one top and one bottom) for each raker from the model. These he loaded into the total station's internal computer. That provides the centerline for each PP-24.

    My next posting here: SS for a Concert Hall.

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  6. #6
    Registered User davidsenna03's Avatar
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    Very detailed work!. Love the way that the structure drives the shape of the building.

  7. #7
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by m.d. View Post
    nice job Riff...

    as a former 12 year Ironworker I have a sentimental spot for this kinda stuff
    Tnx all for comments. I haven't seen too many archviz projects without their clothes on. But, then again, these are 'for' construction models; any archviz was done before hand by others (for architects and owners). As I have said, coming up next is SS for a Concert Hall. Very, very detailed and complicated. At least in my opinion. I also have the clothes (final finishes) for that, but I will not show those now. Will do a new thread, eventually, for that. As I have said, the models here attest to my use of LightWave (3d) in real construction.

    I am also sentimental about raw structural steel and concrete. Strange, isn't it? I have known quite a few work people who also shared those feelings. Deep down inside they were loyal to the project (not to their employers) and intended to do the best 'job' possible. As am I.
    Last edited by Riff_Masteroff; 03-10-2014 at 04:49 PM.

  8. #8
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Concert Hall

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    Ambient Occlusion pass. All modeling by myself. I used DP pixel filter plus DP AO node for this.

    Asymmetrical Cutaway: Steel and Concrete structure. CMU not shown. Final finishes not shown except for gypsum perimeter ceiling ring near top of hall (just under trusses). Also, there are adjacent parts of the structure not shown here.

    Based on a conversation with the head of 'my' construction company, I was assigned to this jobsite near the beginning of construction. I spent two years onsite. Using 3d to iron out constructability problems before they happened for real. LightWave was, at first, just a tool for me; but . . . . it proved to be far more useful than advertised. At second, I became a fanboy.

    Note that in 2d, x is the long axis, and, of course, z is the short axis. A complex and unusual project. Please bear with me through some additional postings.

    Then, I will move on to the Skylight from Hades.
    Last edited by Riff_Masteroff; 07-03-2014 at 06:28 AM.

  9. #9
    It looks pretty cool like this. What are you planning for the "additional postings" if I may ask?

    Quote Originally Posted by Riff_Masteroff View Post
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    Ambient Occlusion pass. All modeling by myself. I used DP pixel filter plus DP AO node for this.

    A complex and unusual project. Please bear with me through some additional postings.

  10. #10
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Tess:

    1) Some detailed explanation of the project. Including use of LW in construction.
    2) A beauty render. This is my weakness, I hope ppl here will "constructively" crit.

    Also Tess, I self-discovered that there is a difference between the construction model I did years ago and this recent render model. They do look the same, but not to LW, the program. And, for purposes of illustration, I will include a few old renders of the clothes ( the final finishes ). Given more experience and better software, I can do better than the old stuff now. Eventually I intend to start a fresh thread on the hall's final finishes. As I have said in my first posting on this thread, I am cleaning cobwebs on my hard drives. And sharing the results with this community.

    On this thread I will go on to post the structural steel for an atrium. And then a tower crane. That is abit off topic cause its steel structure, not vice versa. All of it, I have had for quite a while. But not redone or completed. I think the files deserve better.

  11. #11
    Stuck in a very big cube Waves of light's Avatar
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    The concert hall is beautifully constructed Riff. Not often you see the underlying frame in arch viz stuff, but i guess that's because it's a pain to do. Can i ask (as I am thinking about starting my next football stadium - the Stade Velodrome renovation) are the supports closed mesh geometry, or do you just sink the cross sections into the beams?


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  12. #12
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    Waves of Light: Each single piece of steel is a closed mesh. I don't use any subdivisions. Each specified by the structural steel design drawings as to cross section. In LW, the cross sections are extruded to length needed. I work to an accuracy of 1/1000". A truss, for example, will have many separate pieces. Including various angles and plates. In modeler, using many surfaces and parts, I can 'call out' the components. Useful in conversations with construction ppl who don't need to understand LW.

    Construction Note: Most of the steel is held together with bolts. Only half the bolts are put into place. Then the structure, in its entirety, is completed ( loaded up ) and it settles. Forever settled. Then the rest of the bolts are put into place and tightened. No matter what you do, steel flexes alot. Got to go with it. Concrete less so.

    Did your eyes glaze over yet?

  13. #13
    Super Member tburbage's Avatar
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    Nice work, and interesting, different kinds of models. Look forward to seeing more... Thanks for sharing.

  14. #14
    Stuck in a very big cube Waves of light's Avatar
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    Thanks Riff for eye glazing detail! Using your method, do you find it easy to reuse parts of the structure, even when lengths, curvature and size change?


    Systen Spec: i7 4930k (OC @4.5ghz),ASUS p9x79 MB, 32GB Ballistix RAM, H60 cooling, Samsung SSD 120GB, WD 1TB

  15. #15
    inside the beltway Riff_Masteroff's Avatar
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    More Concert Hall

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    Detailed Explanation, as promised: Reference the AO render (Thumbnail at bottom) and posted previously. That is best downloaded in its full resolution of 3072x2048 and opened in MS Photo Viewer. Zoom in on details and pan. NT Forum resolution is less than 50% of that.

    Chorus Platform (1st Thumbnail): Look at bottom left (stage) of the AO render. See the large kidney shaped hole in the stage? Its for an basement-to-stage elevator. Preparation of hall before concert: if a chorus is needed, platform is raised to stage from basement. If not, the entire stage is flat. Singers access platform from 1st balcony. Balcony has section (mirrored) that removes. The architect was vague. She sat in my small office onsite in a construction trailer, and we completed the design together. In LightWave. Multiple compound curves. I sent part of the resulting LW mesh to Toronto to be manufactured on a three axis milling machine. It is a big machine. Its enclosure was about the size of a 1 1/2 car house garage.

    Finished Ceiling Ring (2nd Thumbnail): Finished gypsum ceiling and perforated metal panels (blue). The perimeter of the ceiling, the oval ring, important, was constructed first. 45 to 72 feet above stage (on Y-axis). Temporary scaffolding covering the entire concert hall floor was erected to a height 10' below ring. Covered solid with horizontal plywood floor. It shook, maybe +/- 1" on the X-Z axis. Shown is the 2nd version of the ring curve on the long axis (X). The 1st interferred with the structural trusses above. Caught early on by the LW model, and corrected by the archs before construction.

    Parts of the concert hall extracted from the AO model (3rd Thumbnail): Not much to look at, but, imo, important:

    The gypsum ring, shown also in the AO model, defined not only the ceiling, but the room the concert goer sees. Compare to a Russian doll within a doll. The outer room is structure. Its ceiling is abutting 6" concrete precast planks laid solid on top of the trusses. Two trusses shown here of 18 total. Structural concrete walls up to 16" thick. Sound reflective. Think of yodeling on the concrete stage and listening for multiple complex echoes. The inner room: concert attendee is not able to see through, but . . . . . transparent to sound and air ( walls and ceiling). In between the two rooms . . . . motorized vert & horizontal sound absorbing curtains. Before a concert, less than a dozen presets configure the hall to be some wheres between completely sound reflective and absorptive. Push a button, the hall sets itself for one person to play acoustic classical guitar at stage center. Or another for a chamber orchestra. etc. The presets can be tweaked, say, for a sold out concert or one half subscribed.

    The foreman of the gypsum crew had, at peak, almost a thousand working for him in various parts of the project. I am in the general contractor's 'village' and he is 'our' subcontractor. One day he stomps into my office and says "I can't lay the ring out". He wants me to lay it out for him (information only) from the LW 3d model. I said, according to your contract, your exhibit B, you do your own layout work. No matter, what ever it takes. I was tickled pink. On a daily basis, almost everyday until the ring was completed, he would come to my office at 5am for written perimeter measurements. Had me sign the paper just in case. Fooey, but I did. He had maybe five ppl (x2 mirrored) on it and twenty ppl to fill in the center, as they progressed. He wanted the measurements as his crew progressed, not all at once.

    One day, he stomps into my office in the afternoon. Uh oh. "Riff, Riff" he says, "the ring has a kink in it". Oh noes. Wow, on inspection of the LW model, had that kink in it also. The good news is that I am able to make a 3d model, in precision, real. The bad news is that the arch's design had that very same kink. The arch would visit the jobsite two or three times a week. On those days, someone from project management trailer would walk over and ask if I needed to see her. She would always come when I asked. She said that the ppl below would never see it. Keep on going. Of course, I had to work up the question on paper, just in case. But we proceeded with construction just on a verbal.

    Trusses: Positioned parallel to each other, 14 in the concert hall, 4 in the lobby ceiling (to the right). Truss 04, shown, 50' above stage/108' long/12' high. Truss 12, also shown, 72' above stage/84' long/12' high. In other words the trusses are all different from each other. Took a 400 ton crawler crane (800,000 lb max lift capacity) to place each one in its notches (pockets in the concrete walls). Big stuff. LW did its unadvertised stuff by putting all of the various disciplines in the same model (plaster, HVAC, sprinklers, lighting, and etc) and looking to see if they played nice with each other. Often enough they did not. Saved money by catching constructability problems in the design stage.

    Ventilation: the concert hall does not have much duct work. Air pressure is neutral. Air flows down into the basement (lotsa ducts, fans, and air 'conditioners') through holes in the concrete under many of the seats. Look at the AO render for those holes. Basement had, therefore, negative air pressure. Air in the basement was fed to the lobby (at the right). Lobby had positive air pressure and big fans with huge ducts in its ceiling. Those returned back into the concert via large vents in the solid vertical wall at the ceiling level, above the ring. Full circle. Alot of air, slowly moving, doesn't create noise.

    Balcony beams are structural concrete (3rd Thumbnail): Think of a see-saw in balance. These structural entities are mainly supported by a continuous vertical concrete wall that separates hall from lobby. They run through the wall into the lobby. The mass of concrete in the lobby counterweights the balconies. A thin 10" slab between those beams, completes the balcony concrete. Plenty of LW catches here from adjacent work.


    Sometimes archviz isn't worth a thousand words, imo. Just wanted to say: here is a situatuation using LW that may be unusual.
    Phew, this is my longest post ever. Next the beauty render. And after, I want to post, here a different project. Last comes the tower crane.
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    Last edited by Riff_Masteroff; 08-02-2014 at 07:42 AM.

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