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Thread: Object Light

  1. #1

    Post Object Light

    Season's Greetings!

    Hi guys,

    Is there any link or feature in lightwave regarding object light??

    As the title says object light, were we can assign the object surface material as a light source of a scene like garden lamp see image attachment:

    Hope for your quick response. thanks
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  2. #2
    Super Member Snosrap's Avatar
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    Luminosity in the Basic tab of the Surface Editor. You can use values over 100% if you want/need. If you use Radiosity the surface will actually give off light - otherwise it just glows brightly. Here is a sphere on a plane.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Snosrap View Post
    Luminosity in the Basic tab of the Surface Editor. You can use values over 100% if you want/need. If you use Radiosity the surface will actually give off light - otherwise it just glows brightly. Here is a sphere on a plane.

    Thanks so much Snosrap,
    I've tried that before with luminosity above 100% but the lighting is fake, i mean the object doesn't illuminates as a point light or behaves like a soft light. I even placed a point light inside of an object to simulate a light casting on surfaces but the idea is not real.

    Under Octane render has one feature & it's called blackbody where it shines like a real light behavior when assign to an object. I've tried working with octane render on 3ds max during a pipeline project & OR is also in LW that would be a sure solution.

    But I'm thinking of a native way for LW to work similar on lamp sample.
    Hoping for more suggestions and ideas, guys.
    Last edited by benedict_ilagan; 12-30-2013 at 02:42 AM.

  4. #4
    Quantum Mechanic danielkaiser's Avatar
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    Never used it but there's DP Custom that can set an object as a light source it's part of DP light.
    Last edited by danielkaiser; 12-30-2013 at 05:44 AM.
    Daniel Kaiser

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  5. #5
    Registered User zardoz's Avatar
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    hmmm like snosrap said, are you using Global Illumination (like Monte Carlo)? if you give a surface a luminosity value (you can use anything from 0% to 1000% or more, whatever works with the scene scale) and if you have Global illumination on it will work fine, even using an inverse square as a falloff..
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  6. #6
    Super Member spherical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dickie_ilagan View Post
    I've tried that before with luminosity above 100% but the lighting is fake, i mean the object doesn't illuminates as a point light or behaves like a soft light. I even placed a point light inside of an object to simulate a light casting on surfaces but the idea is not real.
    If you're using an object that has a surface, it will "behave like a soft light". It won't look like a point light illumination because it has surface area that is far larger than a point. Not to make a pun but that's the point of making a surface luminous.
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  7. #7
    Yeah Dikie, sounds like you're doing something wrong if you can't get radiosity to work right... the Radiosity engine works perfectly fine, and accurately, it's just slow and can be blotchy with some scenarios. Radiosity using luminous surfaces is far more realistic than using lights. especially if you're using a PBRT workflow. Are you working in sRGB workflow?

  8. #8
    Axes grinder- Dongle #99
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    (away from machine) Maybe an example with a long, linear, squiggly mesh would illustrate this better.

    The feature has always worked for me, although the render times can be brutal.
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  9. #9
    Thanks guys for those great ideas,

    zardoz theory is true but the luminosity seems light behaves unnaturally coz of lack of light temperature (soft yellow) wc emits & causes an atmospheric glow seen on outer of the rim like on the sample pic. Yeah, that can be done on adding on post work or even with a very little value of glow feature that LW surface has.

  10. #10
    That, dponts filter kit, corona or some such tool that will give you some haze/atmosphere will help.
    Temperature for such a surface is decided by you; lacking it suggests you left the surface color white or cranked the luminosity too high as you should get color bleed and all that good stuff from the radiosity engine.
    Even with the Octane emissions, I have found I have to reduce the emissions to silly low levels (.05 one time). I am learning to equate that to a 50 to 75% range for luminosity when trying to light a scene the same as Octane.

    It's the haze and bloom-age you are really looking for, I bet: Octane's renderer benefits from having an atmosphere ON by default. Makes the mood travel better as you test your renders.
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  11. #11
    Electron wrangler jwiede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dickie_ilagan View Post
    Thanks guys for those great ideas,

    zardoz theory is true but the luminosity seems light behaves unnaturally coz of lack of light temperature (soft yellow) wc emits & causes an atmospheric glow seen on outer of the rim like on the sample pic. Yeah, that can be done on adding on post work or even with a very little value of glow feature that LW surface has.
    Those effects are due to the tiny level of atmospheric haze always present in real life. You should be able to replicate such effects in LW, you'd need to activate volumetric fog at a minimal amount to achieve it (and volumetric GI, etc.). Beware, though, render times will become painful -- using post fx (either in LW as glow, or in comp) for such effects is usually much more efficient, but LW can do it if you must have it rendered.
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  12. #12
    That glow in the picture is really a photographic effect, so it's happening in the camera, best done in post. I think LW has some built in post type filters that I've never (and would never) use, why beat yourself up trying to get that in your render, it's not cheating to achieve that in post.

  13. #13
    Those effects are due to atmospherics, particulates, DOF and Fraunhofer driffraction, in the lens aperture, over and above lens reflections... With the exception of DOF, Lightwave handles none of those things. You can fake some of them with 'glow' or using better stuff, like DP's filter, but it's not as good. Very few rendering engines offer a complete model though, and it's not always right. You're probably better at handling them with post, but it's quite difficult to do a full model/ period, and even the full PBRT renderers like Maxwell or Octane don't do everything or do it right.

    With regards to colour temperature, and emissivity, as I said make sure you are using the srgb colour model in your lightwave settings, this will mitigate most of the colour bleed issues and give your light bounce the correct light penetration into the scene. If you take a look at my website, all of my renders are done ONLY in Lightwave, and then I apply post processing in AfterFX to get the bloom and glow effects. All of the interiors are entirely lit by radiosity ONLY (except for sunlight coming through the window in some cases, which is a dome light, with a small radius). Note as Zardoz said, you need HIGH values in your luminosity. Typically I have between 300-1500% brightness for luminous surfaces, and most of them have subtle colour. There's a colour temperature mode in the LW colour picker, if you want to emulate that, but don't confuse emissive power with colour temperature. In a lot of real-world lights the colour temperature and emission spectrum is emulated, so it's not a function of the black body radiance.

    The other thing is exposure. Lighwave has no exposure model.. everything is at a unified exposure level, so nothing is interconnected with real values. In the real world the relative light level of sunlight as compared to interior lighting may be 10-100% different, but we tend to normalise it a bit too much in the 3D world, especially in Lightwave, because there's no exposure control.

  14. #14
    Tobian,
    With regards your afx process, do you create a lot of buffers, too? I remember you posted some material on Radiosity, iirc, that was quite beneficial to understanding the new system.

    Looks like you even speak to the ops question: http://www.andrewcomb.com/pluto_stat...group-webinar/

    Great looking stuff.
    Robert Wilson
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  15. #15
    No need to do extra buffers for my workflow, I just save out the whole dynamic range image, and use that as the basis for the filtering. Yes I do cover some of the advanced shading methods I use in my talk. I was a bit nervous, so I am not sure of how much use it is

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