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Thread: Custom rig with Nevron, and other videos

  1. #16
    Lightwave junkie stevecullum's Avatar
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    Hey Ryan, I've been watching through you IK booster videos - there is some really cool stuff that I didn't even know was possible in LW - onion skinning, that crazy spring effect from that long bone chain - awesome stuff. But there was a bit that kind of got skimmed over, that would be very helpful when working with nevron. How can I use IK booster to clean up the jitteriness on the feet, then turn it into something I can then loop? I have a walk, that I would like to use, but it need some cleaning etc... Perhaps you already covered this some where - if so can you post a link to the right video?

    Many thanks!
    i7 X3930/32GB/Quadro 4000

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by stevecullum View Post
    How can I use IK booster to clean up the jitteriness on the feet, then turn it into something I can then loop? I have a walk, that I would like to use, but it need some cleaning etc... Perhaps you already covered this some where - if so can you post a link to the right video?
    Kinect mocap is really flakey when it comes to the legs; they will require a lot of adjustment for usable results if the camera isn't positioned to cut off the knees in the shot.

    For cleaning up the jitteryness of the feet for Nevron mocap (Kinect), take a look at "FullTimeIK_with_IKB.mp4" bundled with the IKB content. After saving your mocap file, load it into another scene and bake out nulls like shown in the video which will act as the IK targets. You will then be able to delete blocks of keyframes on those nulls where jittering/sliding occurs in the legs, using linear keys as the end of the block to remove the wobble TCB causes. The only reason I suggest this method is that you will need to manipulate the center of gravity or equivalent in order to re-balance the character so that their torso is properly aligned over their legs. When done, you can re-save the relative motion and deploy it wherever desired.

    For normal mocap, you have several options:

    - Baking + fix will fit the bill most of the time; just delete a few keyframes using "child" mode on the upper leg for a frame or two after the character needs to lift their leg.

    - Binding is a fast way to shove the motion of a limb up to the topmost parent of the heiarchy. This is useful for those occasional instances where both the object and the bones need to move at the same time in order for the motion to operate correctly (IE: character is on both of their knees).

    - Interpolating via deleting.


    As far as looping, you'll need to use the following tools:

    - Delete key in child mode.

    - Copy Key from Current in All mode

    What you'll need to do is make the keyframes very loose at the beginning and end of the motion, and use copy key from current to paste the very first keyframe on the entire heiarchy to the last frame so that the first and last frames match. Alternatively, if you don't want to worry about keyframing work you can set a pre-mix of 1-4 frames when loading the motion so that it'll transition into it; just know there is a limit to how different the first frame of the second motion can be from the last frame of the first.
    Last edited by Ryan Roye; 03-29-2014 at 09:37 AM.
    Professional-level 3d training: Ryan's Lightwave Learning
    Plugin Developer: RR Tools for Lightwave

  3. #18
    Lightwave junkie stevecullum's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice, Ryan. I'm currently working with regular mo-cap right now. Been playing about with autobind and bakespots, after deleting the Z motion of the hips bone. The way it propels the character forward is superb! I can see from your 3rd IKB video that it's capable of some really amazing things. One thing I do see in my own experiments, is sometime you see the character appear to walk down an invisible flight of stairs. Haven't quite figured out the cause of this yet, but wondered if it might be related to the hips still. Thanks again for the tips - will see what I can come up with now...
    i7 X3930/32GB/Quadro 4000

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by stevecullum View Post
    Haven't quite figured out the cause of this yet, but wondered if it might be related to the hips still. Thanks again for the tips - will see what I can come up with now...
    If the character object is moving after loading a relative-prepped clip, then you need to make sure that you delete all the XYZ keyframes of the character object before saving. Remember, you want the "jump" bind null to take care of all the XYZ positioning so you can just load the clip and have it play from where the character is currently standing.

    Good luck! If you get stuck at any point just give me a PM or post here.
    Professional-level 3d training: Ryan's Lightwave Learning
    Plugin Developer: RR Tools for Lightwave

  5. #20
    Lightwave junkie stevecullum's Avatar
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    Thanks Ryan. The two circular bind nulls that get attached, is that to make sure the bake spot's Y position is maintained consistently? From what I'm observing from just playing with a simple bones only test, it's seems to be the cause of the stair stepping effect. I'm trying to understand the logic of the rig, so I can adapt it to my own setups..etc..
    i7 X3930/32GB/Quadro 4000

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by stevecullum View Post
    Thanks Ryan. The two circular bind nulls that get attached, is that to make sure the bake spot's Y position is maintained consistently? From what I'm observing from just playing with a simple bones only test, it's seems to be the cause of the stair stepping effect. I'm trying to understand the logic of the rig, so I can adapt it to my own setups..etc..
    At some point I must have missed this post. Breakdown:

    - The two triangular nulls (footbind left/right) are for hand-keyed motions. All motions using these nulls should always assume the character is moving in only 1 direction. Animations that use these nulls can be steered around freely when prepared and saved correctly. Most often, these are used for any walk/run cycles, climbing things like a ladder, etc.

    - The sphere-shaped null called "Jump" is used instead of the triangular footbind nulls when dealing with motion capture and motions that have pre-defined turns. The jump null is necessary to simplify centering it on the character object between uses.

    Essentially, using a same as item constraint and holding the nulls in place, then baking the motion... inversely transfers all motion on that null. When a bakespot is then applied, and the motion is saved, the bakespots activate and re-invert the motion, applying it to the character object and yielding additive motion (letting it play from where the character is currently standing).
    Professional-level 3d training: Ryan's Lightwave Learning
    Plugin Developer: RR Tools for Lightwave

  7. #22
    Lightwave junkie stevecullum's Avatar
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    Thanks for the Breakdown Ryan. After many hours of experimenting, I discovered the source of my problems was a dodgy mocap file. When viewed in an orthographic window, it sloped up hill over time. When I tried with a key framed walk cycle, the issue went away. I'll have to see if I can fix the source file first and then re-test with the advantage of the above information in mind. Cheers!
    i7 X3930/32GB/Quadro 4000

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