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Thread: You guys seen these monster 16 core machines?

  1. #1

    You guys seen these monster 16 core machines?

    Apparently they run OSX very well
    http://www.mediaworkstations.net/ind...i7sixteen.html

    base model is $6000.00 US

    let's see, if I don't eat anything for 2 months per year...

  2. #2
    pass:sword OFF's Avatar
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    You can save half of the funds and more by build a computer yourself:
    http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trks...at=0&_from=R40

  3. #3
    You can save a lot by building your own car too I've never built my own system and have no interest in learning to. In addition, making one that runs OSX is an extra level of difficulty - but I see you run Win 7 -

    At $6k this is the same price as the current (old) 12 core mac pro with the 3.2ghz procs, and also has the same 1yr warranty - looks like a great alternative, esp. if Apple stops making desktops
    Last edited by toby; 03-29-2013 at 07:57 PM.
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  4. #4
    pass:sword OFF's Avatar
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    So far I have not tried to build a car (btw - my father was doing), but most of their computers i gathered myself, as a result of that would be worth 6k and more cost for me in 1.5-2k (2xXeon E5-2650, 32Gb ram, etc.), plus a warranty from the manufacturer of each component - the processor, motherboard, memory, etc.

  5. #5
    Oh you really should build your own cars. Not from scratch, but by completely rebuilding an old one. My neighbor just did that with a chevy truck, it's now rust-proof from the frame up, has wireless controls, flatscreen monitors, supercharger, nitrous, and cost him $15k less than a new one with none of that stuff on it. You'd be crazy to spend $15,000 more than you need to, right? And you can save tons more money by doing your own plumbing, roofing, and learning how to represent yourself in a court of law instead of hiring lawyers.

    As far as computers, they love to talk about building them over in the LW-PC section.

  6. #6
    Building your own rig is no that hard. I've built quite a few with only a few roadblocks. This machine for example had a faulty MB from the factory and just figuring that out gave me a few gray hairs. I have had success overclocking a few too but I've also blown a pair of Motherboards over the years trying to overclock them so I'm weary of OC'ing now. To build a Hackingtosh read up on the appropiate forums, some hardware configurations are known to work without much hassle specially ones that match a mac model.

  7. #7
    can't believe how many times I've heard all this

    We *all know that by now*, guys.

  8. #8
    •••••••••••••••••••• rsfd's Avatar
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    hm, if that Mediaworkstation runs OSX, then it's nothing else like a "Hackintosh". And it will have the same caveats.
    That's ok, if you don't mind to run that machine unchanged for years. But with every OS update, you will most likely run into issues.
    There are tested configurations that are known to work pretty well (http://www.tonymacx86.com/339-buildi...arch-2013.html), but even with such a machine you can run into issues later on.
    Apple will release new Pro-level desktops later this year. It has been announced by Mr. Tim Cook some months ago.
    If you want a smooth computer experience with OSX, you will still need to buy original hardware. If you don't mind to fix things from time to time, then a Hackintosh may safe you some money.

  9. #9
    eye kan kode gud jrandom's Avatar
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    If they made a quad-processor (32-core) system, that might grab my attention.

  10. #10
    Red Mage Celshader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toby View Post
    Apparently they run OSX very well
    http://www.mediaworkstations.net/ind...i7sixteen.html

    base model is $6000.00 US

    let's see, if I don't eat anything for 2 months per year...
    Looks like the price is coming down on those processors. Last August a colleague kindly ran Dave's marble benchmark on a similar machine that was on loan for a review, and that workstation was priced at $13,000. Most of the cost came from the CPUs.
    Jen's 3D -- LightWave stuff.
    Jen's 2D -- my comic book.

    Python is my smashing board. LightWave is my S.M.A.K.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by rsfd View Post
    hm, if that Mediaworkstation runs OSX, then it's nothing else like a "Hackintosh". And it will have the same caveats.
    That's ok, if you don't mind to run that machine unchanged for years. But with every OS update, you will most likely run into issues.
    There are tested configurations that are known to work pretty well (http://www.tonymacx86.com/339-buildi...arch-2013.html), but even with such a machine you can run into issues later on.
    Aha, this is the kind of issue I figured I'd run into trying to make my own machine. Well there is a chance that apple's new desktop will be 16 core and similarly priced - nice to have options though - can you describe what fixes may be necessary if you update and have problems? Or is it completely random?
    Confirmed -
    No Weapons of Mass Destruction
    or links to Al Queda or 9/11. (Sep. 2003)

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Celshader View Post
    Looks like the price is coming down on those processors.
    Yep - just in time for the newer faster ones to come out! But yea you have explicitly to pick your timing and your cost ratio.
    Confirmed -
    No Weapons of Mass Destruction
    or links to Al Queda or 9/11. (Sep. 2003)

  13. #13
    •••••••••••••••••••• rsfd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toby View Post
    Aha, this is the kind of issue I figured I'd run into trying to make my own machine. Well there is a chance that apple's new desktop will be 16 core and similarly priced - nice to have options though - can you describe what fixes may be necessary if you update and have problems? Or is it completely random?
    Most issues arise from the use of PC-Gfx cards. Many of those do run by default with 10.8.2/10.8.3 (even now in any MacPro since model 3,1/2008), but as these usually don't have the Mac-EFI, one looses the ability to launch the Apple Startup Manager (multi-OS boot, Apple Recovery HD).
    The same is true for other hardware. Certain mainboards e.g. may work now, but they don't will necessarily in a future version of OSX.
    That's one of the reasons why it's usually recommended to stay close to the hardware that Apple uses in their own machines. One needs to keep in mind, that the Hackintosh route isn't really officially "allowed", so Apple may or may not decide to implement features into OSX that will cause trouble on certain hardware configurations. This *can* lead into a situation, where one constantly needs to search/wait for certain hacks to make a new version of OSX compatible again.

    Quote Originally Posted by jrandom View Post
    If they made a quad-processor (32-core) system, that might grab my attention.
    …already possible.
    The question is: are you ready to pay ~ $3.500,- per CPU ?
    Last edited by rsfd; 04-02-2013 at 08:40 AM.

  14. #14
    eye kan kode gud jrandom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsfd View Post
    …already possible.
    The question is: are you ready to pay ~ $3.500,- per CPU ?
    Nope. That's why I don't have one yet. But when that price drops...

  15. #15
    Member ActionBob's Avatar
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    Build a decent machine like mine (i7 6 core, 12 hyperthreaded) and just make sure the motherboard can do quad - sli. Then you can just throw in a bunch of vid cards for much less money than the price of those machines and use a renderer like Octane to have near, real-time feedback (if not pretty much real-time, usable renders). Octane is fast and it only gets faster by installing NVidia cards into it).

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