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Thread: Cropping, Sizing, Cineform HD AVI's

  1. #1
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    Cropping, Sizing, Cineform HD AVI's

    Wondering if there is a workaround for SE's inability to manipulate certain file types. I can size and crop a BlackMagic HD AVI but I cannot do the same to a Cineform HD AVI. Anyone run into this problem? Do I have to render the clip to some other format?
    Thx,
    Emlawpro

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    If you have problems with native files, it's always a good idea to try converting them to the SpeedHQ codec as the first port of call. This usually solves the problem and produces excellent quality files to work with.

    Shabazzy

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    Shabazzy, thanks I'm prepared to do that...this is a large project and will take some time. I just wanted to confirm that certain file types are manipulable and others are not - even if both are, let's say, AVI's. Is this your experience as well?

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    Hi,

    Yeah, there are some files that SpeedEDIT (and all video editing software for that matter) has problems with. And even though they can be of the same file type (such as .avi, .mov. mpeg, mp4 etc), the problem lies with the codecs these file types use to compress the video and audio.

    If you don't have the relevant codec installed or if it's partially installed (i.e., only some of the codec's features are available to the video editing sofware) on your computer, then you'll undoubtedly have problems with the video file.

    This is the main reason NewTek created the SpeedHQ codec because this problem is such a common one. It allows you to pretty much standardise your video files before you begin editing a project.

    I find that it's usually a good idea to always do a conversion of clips not shot by me to SpeedHQ first, then start editing because my work flows so much smoother that way. But everyone has their own methods of working.

    Hope that helps.

    Shabazzy

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    Thx for clarifying...looks like I'll have to do that (convert). Do you notice a compromise in quality going from original (AVI), to Speed HQ, and then to whatever the client needs - in this instance QuickTime to run on a Mac?

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    Oh no!

    QuickTime?!

    Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

    Hmm, the mixing of Apple's system and MicroSoft's system has never been a healthy combination. But I'll get to that in a minute.

    I can honestly say that SpeedHQ's conversions have generally been some of the most faithful reproductions of the original footage when compared to reduced filesize that I ever come across. It's supposed to be what's known as 'lossless' and it seems that they're not lying. So no, I can't in all honesty say that I've noticed any real compromise in quality when going from original to SpeedHQ.

    HOWEVER!

    Using SpeedEDIT to render to quicktime IS A MISTAKE! It doesn't matter whether you go from original to quicktime, or original to intermediate to quicktime, quicktime rendering in SpeedEDIT is a DOG!

    There is a reason for this which I won't bore you with but just know if you need to render to a quicktime file format, use another program. SpeedEDIT just doesn't cut it. I can't really help you with which program to use as I refuse to have anything to do with Apple technologies just on principle, but I'm sure there are other guys here who could help advise on that matter.

    The general workflow would be, convert clips to SpeedHQ, edit project, render project to a high quality lossless avi (using a codec like huffy because it's generally accepted in most windows based video related programs, i.e., players, converters, editors, etc), then use an avi to quicktime conversion program that produces high quality conversions and pray 7 times to whichever god you believe in that Apple will accept this offering.

    Failing that, take the plunge and join my 'Say No To Apple' campaign.
    Last edited by Shabazzy; 11-10-2011 at 04:20 PM.

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    Shabazzy, thanks for the heads up on the Quick Time conversion - as well as all the other info. Your revelation could jeopardize my project... but I don't want to do it if I can't give them great Mac compatible files. I'll mull this over and see if there are any other options out there.
    emlawpro

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    No problem.

    Another thing to consider, is the usage of the Cineform codec in SpeedEDIT. Clips shot using the Cineform codec use both a 10bit YUV and a 12bit RGB colour palette.

    SpeedEDIT uses an 8bit YUV colour palette which means that if your footage is to be shown on a TV, you should be ok but for displays that need to the extra colours (like film), SpeedEDIT could make the project look bad because it loses the extra colour information and so may need extra colour correcting as a pseudo fix.

    Whether to use SpeedEDIT for editing projects like this really depends on where it's going to be screened. And like I said before, making projects that are Apple compatible complicates matters even further.

    I bet you wish you'd never posted anything now, eh?

    Shabazzy

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    Yes, you are making me re-think this whole sordid affair. The Cineform AVI's interestingly are coming from 16mm film (originally shot in the 30's, 40's, 50's and 60's)...both B&W and color. Now I'm wondering if bringing them into SE is compromising them to begin with. And then, of course, there is the compromise to get them to the Mac platform. They will be watched on TV, but most definitely a High Def version. Yikes!

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    Yikes indeed.

    I'd say the best bet is to do 10 second testers and see if these produce acceptable results for your client's approval or not, before fully jumping in.

    Either way you'll have learned something.

    Shabazzy

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    When I need to make a good .mov file I save to AVI in SpeedEdit, use VirtualDub to render an uncompressed AVI and then put this AVI into Quicktime pro to render out the size of .mov file you want.
    It's a long process but produces great results for Mac heads!

  12. #12
    I also make an AVI in Speed Edit then run that through my copy of TMPGEnc Video Mastering Works 5 for the Quicktime, MPEG or whatever else might be needed.

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    Thanks to both of you for those suggestions. I see that one is free and the other offers a free test drive....good news.
    emlawpro

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    I follow about the same workflow of rendering to SpeedHQ AVI for projects. Then compress those files with Sorenson Squeeze 6.5. There are many, many, many different compression options in Sorenson that you can actually create a very good looking .MOV file. However, my main client has found that H.264, 16:9 files to be their preferred format. Sorenson does an excellent job with Speed HQ files and that has become my standard work flow, never relying on any of the other SpeedEdit compression options. Sorenson can be expensive, unfortunately. But if you have to work with different clients with different needs, it to me anyhow, seems like the best answer.
    Bill
    www.interactivevideo.tv
    609-654-6122

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    Hmmmnnn, Sorenson Squeeze...I know of it and it's a great tool. Haven't checked prices lately.
    Thank you for the suggestion.

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