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Thread: 8.5

  1. #16
    Professional enemy shill clagman's Avatar
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    No prob.
    Seeing the glass as half empty is being an optimist when the glass is full of urine

  2. #17
    I have reinstalled the system and looks like Vue xStream does not love 24 threads when rendering inside LightWave. Your scene was rendering OK for 24+ hours on Q6600 when it did not for longer than 5 minutes on 2x X5650 - new Windows install, NOTHING else is crashing.

    I study standalone for now but it is not very stable too. It is not too bad but way behind LW and I was thinking before that lwis not very stable program (comparing to Photoshop for example).
    Cheers
    Tomek
    GarageFarm.NET
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  3. #18
    Professional enemy shill clagman's Avatar
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    Well the truth is I do a hell of a lot more rendering in the standalone anyway (its just sooooo much faster than rendering in LW) and composite. I'm surprised that it won't handle more than 16 threads. Maybe try setting to auto instead of 24.
    Seeing the glass as half empty is being an optimist when the glass is full of urine

  4. #19
    Newbie Member wolfiboy's Avatar
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    I experienced the same problems as Soth with black LW-objects. I found out that is has to do with the loaded atmospheres of Vue. Principally the light-influence is as follows: Vue-Light renders Vue- AND LW-objects. LW-light ONLY renders LW-objects. AND: If you want to use predefined Vue-atmospheres (i.e. if you load an atmosphere) you need to activate radiosity and volumentric radiosity in the LW-render-globals or work with a default-atmosphere and adjust the light.
    The problem with Vue-atmosphere and animation is: Only the standard lighting model works well. With (the more beautiful) global illumination and global radiosity you will get flickering and strange texure effects. But they work well for stills.
    So for light-adjustments I use the Vue-light-options (atmosphere editor) and turn the LW-light to zero.

    As clagman mentioned: I never animate LW-cameras! And I don't animate the vue-camera in LW. For me I came to the conclusion that it saves time and nerves to first build up the vue-scene in Vue-standalone and animate the vue-camera there. Maybe I import some LW-models if I need a clue for the camera-animation, and delete them after the keyframes are ready. Then I open the Vue-scene in LW and add my LW-objects. Vue imports the vue-camera-keyframes automatically. But that's just me, I don't know if there's another way. I tried other ways but after many frustrating hours I gave up.
    But as clagman said: Be aware that some keyframes could be wrong! With most of them it works fine, but I always had at least one that somehow break out (e.g. the y-rotation changed only for one frame). As I render to RGB first I can re-render the wrong frame after I used LW-graph editor to correct the movement of the vue-camera (here it works to animate the vue-camera in LW - maybe only for slight movements?)

    What I also noticed: Don't save a scene with imbedded vue-stuff when you activated FiberX! Vue will crash the next time you open that scene! Workaround: Save the FiberX-settings and load them each time you render the scene and activate FiberX. But don't save the scene! You need to repeat the procedure when you stop rendering and load the scene again.
    Well, I think all other dynamics can't be saved when you work with Vue! E.g. It is not possible to save an already calculated cloth-dynamics! I didn't find a solution for that as to recalculate it again, when I open the scene again. And if you want to use some hard-body-dynamics (such as falling and bouncing objects) you need to use nulls in order to generate keyframes and parent the needed objects to them.

    Well, so far my experiences and I hope it will help.
    Vue is a nice tool, but it has it's own head.


    Cheers, wolfiboy

  5. #20
    Professional enemy shill clagman's Avatar
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    Agreed but the "sun-light" light should still illuminate both Vue and LW. Radiosity can be a problem but I have a good method for getting around using volumetric radiosity...selling my trade secrets here

    Use sky light, or whatever you like for textured environment. Hide this from the output by using a black background in the composite tab, blammo radiosity that more or less matches the Vue environment without rendering the sky. Then you just render the sky and background in Vue. Or you can render a 360 degree single frame from Vue to use as a background in LW or even use that EXR/HDR image to illuminate the scene, whatevah woiks.
    Seeing the glass as half empty is being an optimist when the glass is full of urine

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