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View Full Version : a weee bit off topic>> software licencing



cresshead
06-25-2009, 05:51 PM
a weee bit off topic>> software licencing

lightwave> love it!:D
uses a usb dongle so you can move it install it anywhere, anytime with no email activation needed for moving it around even from mac osx to blista [vista...if find it painful as a blista!]

speededit...ohh dear..softlock onto a single pc...you can't move it or even export the licence...not good.

zbrush allows for multiple installs so if say your main pc falls over you can still work on say your laptop with the other install of zbrush..mind you zbrushes softlock is quite twitcky..had it fail a number of times...they have siad that zbrush 4 softlock will be much more stable.

3dsmax if your on subscription you get a @home and @work install so again your okay if a pc fall over or the install/softlock fails.

painterx...serial number...whooo hooo...simple love it!
photoshop elements serial number whooo hooo...simple love it!

now...toon boom4.5.....serial number...whooo hooo...simple love it!
AND...toon boom 5....ohh ooo!..no they moved to a softlock like speed edit..stuck on 1 pc...rubbish!!!

blender...err...install!

now i can see why some software makers are moving to softlocks in that they want to protect their software but really..the latest example of toon boom moving from serial number to softlock has me on the edge of asking for a refund as it will make the software LESS usable...
i'd like it on a laptop for camera/stop motion sessions out n about but on my quadcore for long hours when back at base.

i'd like software installed and available on a worksttion and a laptop not one or the other.

same with speed edit...just makes me use it less than say finalcut express or my old installer for premiere 6.

so what's people's thoughts on this

will core final release be a softlock...nailed to 1 pc?

Scazzino
06-25-2009, 06:33 PM
I hope not... but if it does, I hope it's at least as flexible as modo's where you can install it on a work, home and laptop computer...

MooseDog
06-25-2009, 10:53 PM
drm's only success has been to piss-off paying customers.

here's to hoping nt stick with the dongle for core, as it's the most reasonable solution, after blender's!

doimus
06-26-2009, 02:27 AM
I say ditch the copy protection altogether and offer free, limited, non-commercial, non-expiring trial edition. Or just make your software free for non-commercial work.

OK, that second option kind of looks radical but eventually it will come to that.
Look at 3ds Max... Do you really think all those kids on online forums shelled out $4500 to get it? Do you think they should have? I don't. Price shouldn't be the factor that could prevent someone from learning.

With today's P2P networking, copy protection on PC is just about useless, as it often does more harm to users than to pirates. I'm personally grown tired of all the lost dongle scares over the years. I wish my copy of Lightwave worked without the dongle, just like the pirated version. How about putting that on a wish list?

What should be charged for is the added service. Imagine if LW9 was free for non-commercial use. Ok then, commercial license would be $ something. Want to access the official forums with official support - that will be $something/year. Then there's the 9.2 upgrade - that will be $something as well. That way kids could download the software from the intrawebs and still have official support for small amount of money. Talk about education of future customers.

StereoMike
06-26-2009, 03:21 AM
restrivtive copy protection punishes only honest users, who play by the rules. So in the end you don't hinder anyone copying it, you just make the usage for your regular clients more troublesome.

biliousfrog
06-26-2009, 04:51 AM
I like the dongle but I don't like it when I want to use a laptop because it scares me that it will get snapped off or I'll lose it. In the past I have used a cracked version on a laptop purely because I don't want the hassle of rummaging behind my workstation for the dongle and then the worry of losing or breaking it...but ID locked plugins have scuppered that idea just as much as my conscience.

I'd like the idea of using the dongle to install and register the software but perhaps not require it all the time. Obviously that would allow people to install it on several machines but those people are just as likely to not buy any licences as just one.

Adobe's licensing system is quite good, you can run the applications on two systems (work and personal), but it's terrible if your computer dies. Basically, once you've installed and activated the software you need to de-activate to install on something else...if you don't have a chance to de-activate you've got to grovel to Adobe.

Personally, I prefer a simple serial number or personal 'key' which can be emailed and stored somewhere safe. Sure, it's easier to pirate but that will happen anyway, for those that are legit it makes things so much easier.

MooseDog
06-26-2009, 08:05 AM
...Sure, it's easier to pirate but that will happen anyway, for those that are legit it makes things so much easier.

and that's the dilemma in this world of cheap/free easy-to-find perfect copies of anything that's digital.

nt's approach should be to bring real value and benefits to the purchase of it's new software. i'm going to trust that baker, roth et al have the imagination to do this.

there's a formulation going around:

connect with fans + give them a reason to buy = $$$

even though it's being posited in discussions about the future of selling music, i think it applies to trying to sell anything digital: movies, books, software, the list is quite long.

biliousfrog
06-26-2009, 09:57 AM
and that's the dilemma in this world of cheap/free easy-to-find perfect copies of anything that's digital.

nt's approach should be to bring real value and benefits to the purchase of it's new software. i'm going to trust that baker, roth et al have the imagination to do this.

there's a formulation going around:

connect with fans + give them a reason to buy = $$$

even though it's being posited in discussions about the future of selling music, i think it applies to trying to sell anything digital: movies, books, software, the list is quite long.

I agree.

For many of us, a large part of the pleasure of listening to music was holding the album sleeve, reading the notes, studying the artwork, learning the lyrics...the current generation are missing all of that. MP3's have not only taken a step backwards in audio quality but also in the way that music is perceived generally - IE: cheap and disposable.

Some artists have really gone out of their way to make traditional media (CD's, DVD's, LP's) more appealling by creating extra content for those formats. It's a wild guess but I'd suspect that those who buy the 'special editions' have more respect for the media and are less likely to pirate it.

Unfortunately I see software companies becoming more like the MP3 brigade than the CD ones. Although I respect that downloads are more environmentally friendly, I still find it very hard to justify to people why I pay for software with no written manual, CD or box when I could download the exact same product for free.

Adobe Production Premium CS3 came in a big box full of manuals, DVD's, training materials, calibration cards, money off vouchers and a free gift. Personally, I think that's fantastic and the box has pride of place next to my desk.

I've spent thousands of pounds on plugins and just get an automated confirmation email.

When I bought Accutrans I got a hand-written invoice sent through the post...that's a $20 piece of software!

I've gone on a bit of a rant but I just wanted to point out that software sales is more than development and reaping the rewards. Give it some worth.

JonW
06-26-2009, 04:57 PM
I have the dongle on a 15 cm cable so if it gets bumped its ok. If Screamernet was close to 100% efficient I wouldn’t bother moving it at all.

RebelHill
06-26-2009, 05:03 PM
restrivtive copy protection punishes only honest users, who play by the rules. So in the end you don't hinder anyone copying it, you just make the usage for your regular clients more troublesome.

Yeah, but u give the crackers something to do...

keeps em off the streets starting bin fires.