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borkus
05-08-2009, 12:55 PM
Hello, all. This is a humbling thread. Just to start it out, as of April 18, 2009, Snopro Trailers (http://www.snoprotrailers.com/), a company based out of Winslow, Maine, has officially closed their doors. We were a recreational and utility trailer manufacturer that had been labeled as number two manufacturer on the north-eastern seaboard for nearly six years. I had started there only four months after it's inception in April of 2000. It was a very fun and challenging job that pushed all the employees to their limits in as far as engineering on the fly (no comment as to why... Anybody that's worked in production will know what that means...), making it a profitable yet fun environment, and keeping are customers happy with what ever they could dream up. We built everything thing from living quarter RV trailers, snowmobile and four-wheelers carriers, construction utility trailers, and hundreds of other things. What ever the dealer could dream of, we could make it or find out who could. It is obvious that I have pride in having been a part of the environment, and hope that if anybody here has a product from our line that it held up to your strictest standards. But, the day came when we had a meeting by our communal time clock and the owner said that it was time to shut the doors one and final time. It was sad, because a lot of us that had been with the company for a while had seen the signs that this was going to happen. But, we all had that hope that we could weather it out and make it through the slump that has also engulfed so many other companies as well. Our shares had plummeted and the bank called our note. Our sales had been down for nearly seven months and were well below the fifty percent goal that the bank said they could have lived with. So, at 4:23 p.m. on that fateful Saturday, I watched as work order number #13,458, a twenty-four foot car hauler outfitted to be a concession trailer for some type of sporting event, slowly crept out the overhead door that I had seen thousands of trailers make the same journey. But, this one would stick out in my mind. That number would signify what would be the final step in this career. It was going to one of our oldest dealers, HK Powersports in Hooksett, New Hampshire.

But, anyway. Fast-forward a couple of weeks, and this is what I am looking for some advice on. Looking around at the current condition of our job market in this region, I made the choice to return back to school. I should have done this years ago. Had always had it in the back of my mind, but I was making really good money with Snopro and just could never afford the downtime. Now, unfortunately, that is beyond my control. I signed up with the local trade school, Kennebec Valley Community College (http://www.google.com/#hl=en&q=kennebec+valley+community+college&aq=0&oq=kennebec+valley&fp=ry0_Tod3DXA), looking to follow their Applied Electronics and Computer Technology course. It is a one year course that has the following curriculum:

AECT (http://www.kvcc.me.edu/Website/Frames/WebSiteData/ProspectiveStudents/ProgramsOfStudy/AppliedElectronics.aspx) – Associate in Science Degree

First Semester

Introduction to Communication
College Composition
Computer Operating Systems
Direct Current Theory
Advanced College Algebra
General Elective

Second Semester

Digital Electronics
Semiconductor Fundamentals
Alternating Current Theory
Precalculus
General Elective
Social Science Elective
Third Semester

Computer Operating System Applications
Microprocessor Fundamentals
Analog Circuit Analysis
Electronic Communication Systems
Electronic Applications Lab
Elements of Physics

Fourth Semester

Network Operation Systems
Digital/Data Communications
Networking Applications Lab
Calculus 1
Elements of Physics II
Humanities Elective

Seems like a lot of good stuff to be had in there. But, my question knowing that a lot of you have been in this field for years, is how much will this lead to a decent paying job. One year isn't a lot, but if this is just going to get me some low-paying job at some computer, I could use this time to get into a company and start working up the ladder. I have worked with my hands for practically all my life. I was working in a wood shop when I was nothing but a boy. Worked as a lead man in a construction outfit before I was even legal to work. But, I'm not getting any younger. Lugging full sheets of 3/4” pressure treated plywood from one side of a football field to the other doesn't sit well with me like it used to. I'm covered from head to toe in scars from all the jobs I've had through the years. To be honest, I think I paid my dues at this point of working like a horse. But, with this decision, this is chartering into a world unknown to me. I have dabbled with computers since the Apple II e days, but have never had a job pertaining to them. They do offer a graphic arts course at this same college. But seeing so many people just within this forum struggling for work makes it a not very lucrative class to take at this point. If I can, I'll squeeze in some electives in that field. Is this course just going to be a primer? Will it have the credentials to land a decent job? The area I am looking to work is in the southern Portland area of this state. It is so far the best paying sector around here. It is my hope that I can land something decent, and hopefully the employer would pay for further schooling. The loose game plan that I have at the moment is to pursue a tech job in the medical field. Perhaps radiology, or something of that nature. A google search turned up some crazy figures on jobs in that realm. But, like anything, good things come to those that pay out the *** to get that... Of which, I will bite the bullet if I have to. Taking this event that seemed very depressing at one point and trying to make something positive of it is my goal. Had my company stayed in business for another ten years, I likely would have still been there. It was a good job, but it had little to offer in as far as advancement. The upper brass had been there since it's inception and had little intention on leaving, just like the rest of us. So, I am basically asking for any advice that others can give in entering this field. What should I pick my professor's brains for to apply in the workplace. Should I continue on to a four year college? There are two in this state that offer further training. I would say that that is a given. But were I to do that, I would be thirty-seven at my graduation. Hardly the young, whipper-snapper to be hitting a brand new job field. Especially with all the young kids that seem to know how to program in C++ before they can talk... What are experiences that others have had with this type of work? Do employers tend to agree to pay for further schooling? This was something that a lot of companies in the production field have been getting sneaky about. They will train you “in house”, so that you can not take your certification with you elsewhere. And, they also don't have to pay you what you would be worth. Anyway, I'm sure I will have a ton more questions. These are just the ones that came off the top of my head. Thank you in advance for any comments.

Silkrooster
05-08-2009, 06:28 PM
So do you want to run the computer or fix it? I personally think the computer field is going through the same slump, but if you play your cards right you should be able to find a high paying job. Especially in a field that is thriving like the medical field.
I also think the closer you are to a large city the higher the pay and expenses.
I hate hearing about any business closing. So I hope you find your financial path asap.
Good luck.

borkus
05-08-2009, 09:42 PM
Thanks Silk. I would rather be running the computer. But, to be honest, I will take whatever I can get. I have been trying to learn C++ for the last year. This was to pursue a hobby in making games. Doing a little research on that seemed disheartening... To work for a big house meant to give your life away in countless hours and substandard pay. Unless you could get into one of the biggies. But, it would seem that it takes a lot to do something like that. And, going indie is definetly not an easy route either. A part of me would like to be a programmer. A small sense of still building something with my hands. But, again, that is a field that doesn't seem to be rife with high paid salaries. I'm sorry if it seems like I am being arrogant. But, damnit, I worked for ten years with only getting a 10 cent raise per year. When it was all said and done, I was only making $15 an hour, and I was one of the highest paid employees there. I saw a blurb on MSNBC just a bit ago saying, "American families struggling with getting by making only $75,000 a year...". Holy ****... Made me rethink what my values were to hear that.

Silkrooster
05-08-2009, 10:26 PM
I certainly would not blame you for taking anything thats available. After all you have to live first. But if you play it right maybe one job could lead into another. Or if you have to take the first that comes along, that doesn't mean you have to stay with it. After all the whole point is to work up the ladder.
Man I wish I made 75 g's that would be awesome. Around here the average rate is $6 to 10 starting out and maybe up to $25 depending on the job. But I am in the country so very little in the electronics fields. I wouldn't be surprised if some mill jobs are above $25 but not really sure and they are shutting down quite often. The last mill was a GM plant. But that a couple of counties away.

Hopper
05-09-2009, 12:09 AM
Silk has a good point. Right now, field techs and IT admins are in short supply in the medical field believe it or not. Companies are getting much smarter after the last tech crash. They were gobbling up all the resumes they could but soon found out that the "good" people are still hard to come by. They are a lot more descerning about who they hire these days. A friend of mine is a network tech at Seton Medical here in Austin. He's been getting calls like mad for jobs all over the place here, but he likes it where he is. Benefits are good and the pay is comfortable for him and his family. I think he's making around $80k or so.

Around here, starting pay for a solid tech with some experience under his/her belt is about $50-$60k. More seasoned vets make around $75-90k depending on your specialty. If you're interested in database work or programming, the entry level pay is about the same, but senior and principal programmers are in the $85-110k range. It will all depend on where you live though. If the average cost of living is lower, then obviously expect a lower range.

I also agree with Silk's other point of simply taking what you have to for the time being. Work is work. If you have to support yourself and/or your family, it just doesn't matter. I respect anyone that is working to support themselves and their families no matter what the job is.

akademus
05-09-2009, 12:39 AM
Well,
large studios/facilities are always in need of good tech people. I personally ran away from being computer technician to being an artist, but I still like problem solving when computer goes down.

With today's technology, I believe tech people are having less and less head aches, compared to old times ;)

Good luck

DiedonD
05-09-2009, 12:40 AM
American famlies are struggling with 75.000,00 $???!!?

And you speak of 50.000,00$ - 60.000,00$ as standards!!!

My gosh, youd live like Kings here with that much!! KINGS!!!

The trick is to find an online job on a lower standards of living country! And programming as well as 3d arts are best candidates for that!

The other one that may work online, would be counsiling by video calls or something!

So my advice is, take whatever job you can that may appear as if it wont ever do enough for your family, but with the condition that you can do it online. Once you get that, consider moving abroad, and with the figures above, youd suddenly find yourslf in the luxorious world, trust me!

There are alota places that have lower standards in Europe. Here is one of them, and we have a predesposed positive mindset after what happened in 1999. So its an advantage still to be foreigner, not to mention that youll be considered the countries guest, and that is also a value here.

But if you want to live like a God with the figures above, then go more east, or in your case, west!

India, China, Vietnam and such would be great place to live with such figures for instance.

That is of course unless you MUST be grounded! But, if you said that you could even take a bullet, then moving abroad is a far les riskier thing.

warmiak
05-09-2009, 12:31 PM
A part of me would like to be a programmer. A small sense of still building something with my hands. But, again, that is a field that doesn't seem to be rife with high paid salaries. I'm sorry if it seems like I am being arrogant. .


Well, depends how you define high salaries... I work as a computer programmer with about 10 years of experience behind my belt and I am making 100+ K .. perhaps not a lot by many standards but enough for me :-)

Beside, for the most part working as a programmer is a creative process ... personally I find it much more rewarding then fixing computers or maintaining networks.

OnlineRender
05-09-2009, 01:12 PM
last year total earning was just over 8k , yes that was 8 grand , £8,000 , student life , 2kids , great fun having no food , but im happy and thats what counts , money used to be an issue now im just content .

so in short pick what you want , as long as your happy , who cares about money .

warmiak
05-09-2009, 01:32 PM
But were I to do that, I would be thirty-seven at my graduation. Hardly the young, whipper-snapper to be hitting a brand new job field. Especially with all the young kids that seem to know how to program in C++ before they can talk...


You are looking at it wrong way …. In 4 years you are going to be 37 no matter what and at 37 you still have almost 30 years worth of work ahead of you ( in other words you are only ¼ way thru.)

People seem to associate computer science with young 20somethings but that’s only because the field itself is young …. It seems like there are plenty of engineers/doctors in their 50s and 60s but you hardly see any programmers or 3d artists or whatever.
Just wait another 20 years … the whole thing started in the mid/late 1980s with computers entering the mainstream …. and people who were 20somethings at that time are still only in their mid/late 40s.

byte_fx
05-09-2009, 01:35 PM
First of all - research.

Pick a location you want to line. The best job sours fast if you don't where you're living.

Second - look for openings in your newly chosen field that that your previous experience will augment. Example - it sounds as though you're experienced with turning materials into a finished product. Capitalize on that. It's experience many people in the computer field, for example, don't have.

Salary isn't everything. US$75,000 doesn't very far in many areas especually if you have a $3000/$4000 (or much higher) a month mortgage on top of transportation and other living expenses. Overall job satisfaction is very important. But remember a regular paycheck beats no paycheck.

If it comes taking a job you don't like try to do so in an area you like that has potential openings for something better. Consider working an off shift so the days are free for job hunting or more training.

Try the 'Hollywood Shuffle where everyone seems to be a pool guy/waitress/limo driver/actor/actrress/screen writer/director.

Best of luck!

IMI
05-09-2009, 01:59 PM
I don't have any great advice or anything, but I just wanted to take a moment to say, "I hear ya, man."
I watched my industry die this past year too, and also ended up jobless as a result. My response was to change fields as well, to follow one of the things I've really wanted to do for a while, to become a professional computer builder. I've done a great deal of that "on the side" and currently am working part time for a custom PC shop, building and repairing computers, but want to have my own business before the end of this year.

But like I said, my point was just to sympathize. Well, maybe not just that... it's sad to see your bread and butter vanish before your eyes, but I truly believe that for every door that closes, another one opens. :)

Maxx
05-09-2009, 04:44 PM
Don't write off employment agencies - contract and temporary work can go a long way. I picked up a short-term contract with a local company doing php programming that's paying far better than one would expect for a temp position in a non-technological company. And a lot better hourly than most of the permanent positions I'd applied for over the last couple years. I did some contract work in the past doing Actionscript programming for a different (this one was technology-based) company that also paid very well. You do have to have the basic skills to get the job done, obviously, but it can be a little more forgiving than attempting to land a permanent job. And you can always use the opportunity to expand your existing skill set.

Now, the thing is, you won't (typically) get health insurance or many of the perks, but a lot of companies are willing to turn their savings (by not paying your benefits) into higher hourly rates.

Hit the websites of some of the employment agencies - national and local - and see what's available. And in the meantime, make sure you've got something you can do to keep mostly on top of the bills - I went back to waiting tables and bar tending last year at the tender young age of 35...

borkus
05-09-2009, 06:59 PM
A friend of mine is a network tech at Seton Medical here in Austin. He's been getting calls like mad for jobs all over the place here, but he likes it where he is. Benefits are good and the pay is comfortable for him and his family. I think he's making around $80k or so.
That is a lot closer to what I want to be shooting for. The highest I ever got to with Snopro was $35,000. At the time, it seemed like a good living. But, my goal is to move up. The mistake I made with that company was staying there even after I realized that there was no where to go after a certain point. Even well before the economy started to fail, they took me in the office and said that they would have to cap me at the point I was at. Because I was approaching what he had agreed to pay his salaried management. Having learned that lesson, it's now all about me. I played the game of company man. Saying ok when I should have threatened to leave. But, it's all in a lifetime. You live and learn.


The trick is to find an online job on a lower standards of living country! And programming as well as 3d arts are best candidates for that!

The other one that may work online, would be counsiling by video calls or something!
I have researched this a bit. The thing that I keep finding is that being paid for your services can be a constant problem. Much easier to get screwed on the net than in person. This, coupled that there are many countries that are very willing to do the same work for a lot less than we would expect in America. I was vying for some work online for a simple architectural project, and a young man from Japan underbid me by quite a bit. Which was fine. Until I get an email from this guy saying, "Ah, silly Americans. Charge too much. I get job, haha.". It would cost me $7,308 to fly him from Nagoya, Japan to Portland, Maine. I sent him a reply asking if he would like to reverberate that statement in person... No response.


So my advice is, take whatever job you can that may appear as if it wont ever do enough for your family, but with the condition that you can do it online. Once you get that, consider moving abroad, and with the figures above, youd suddenly find yourslf in the luxorious world, trust me!
I would love to see the world at this point. But, my girl and I are kinda stuck at the moment. She has a really good paying job that she likes. I would be a fool to ask her to give it up and take her chances in this market. But, we have discussed that when I turn 40, I would like to work my way south a little bit. Maybe one of the Virginia's, or North Carolina. But, at that point, I will have had plenty of time to research where a good place would be to live that also has a good job market. I don't picture leaving the country, but I'm always open to that idea. I was in the military, and have many friends that were as well or did a lot of traveling. And, the consensus that all of us agree with is that Americans are not very well liked abroad. While this may be different in your country, it is the norm in many others. I think it best to stay in the good, old US at the moment. We also have plenty of areas that are very low income sectors as well.


Well, depends how you define high salaries... I work as a computer programmer with about 10 years of experience behind my belt and I am making 100+ K .. perhaps not a lot by many standards but enough for me :-)

Beside, for the most part working as a programmer is a creative process ... personally I find it much more rewarding then fixing computers or maintaining networks.
warmiak is offline Report Post Reply With Quote
That is a very nice salary, warmiak. Even though you have been at it for ten years. But, it's good to know that that type of money is out there in that field. And, that is also why I would like to lean towards programming. I can imagine that it is enjoyable to have someone approach you with a problem, and you can code a solution. When I had first started out in C++, I had this plan to make a simple program that would tie in our sales department into our inventory department. It would have been connected by a lan line and would pretty much be automated. I quickly discovered that I was wwwwaaaayyyy over my head for a beginner. But, I would like to look back someday at the notes I made and be able to do that...


so in short pick what you want , as long as your happy , who cares about money .
While I would have whole-heartedly agreed with you a year ago, I am looking at things a little differently now. Yes, I know that money isn't everything. But, it seems like every time I go to do something, it involves money. Factor in my girl whom I love to death, but is not cheap to maintain, and I am where I am at now. I worked for the last company for a almost a decade, not worrying about the money. It was a job that was fun and I learned a lot of things. But, now that is gone and I am left with not a whole hell of a lot to show for it. To give up that happiness during the workday will be of little sorrow to enjoy my life better on the outside...


You are looking at it wrong way …. In 4 years you are going to be 37 no matter what and at 37 you still have almost 30 years worth of work ahead of you ( in other words you are only ¼ way thru.)

People seem to associate computer science with young 20somethings but that’s only because the field itself is young …. It seems like there are plenty of engineers/doctors in their 50s and 60s but you hardly see any programmers or 3d artists or whatever.
Just wait another 20 years … the whole thing started in the mid/late 1980s with computers entering the mainstream …. and people who were 20somethings at that time are still only in their mid/late 40s.
I stand corrected. Again, mine is of a perspective of looking from the outside in. I have no contacts in this field and rely only on what I can find online for reference. One of the sources that I had seen most of that data was from the magazine Game Developer. They painted the work conditions for programmers to be very bad. Very long hours and putting people on salary because it was an office environment. This concerned me, as my Uncle worked for a local power company in this area and they did this as well. I remember many weeks of him putting in well over 80 hours, and taking home the same check as the week before where he only worked 40 hours. This was where Snopro was the cream of the crop for me. We had practically unlimited overtime for years. They use to have to kick me out of there.


look for openings in your newly chosen field that that your previous experience will augment. Example - it sounds as though you're experienced with turning materials into a finished product. Capitalize on that. It's experience many people in the computer field, for example, don't have.
This was something that I had been wracking my brain about for a while. To take what I know well and apply it to this new direction. But, it seems that I will have to wait until I build up some more skills to form this direction. But, like you said, it is a skill set that someone that has sat behind a computer their entire career for wouldn't have. Or, at least, not as comprehensive of hands on training. I did learn a lot about marketing, production standards, and managing a crew while there. And many other things. No sense in throwing that away.


Salary isn't everything. US$75,000 doesn't very far in many areas especually if you have a $3000/$4000 (or much higher) a month mortgage on top of transportation and other living expenses. Overall job satisfaction is very important. But remember a regular paycheck beats no paycheck.
As I replied to Onlinerender, I understand this but come from a different school of thought at the moment. Being happy with my job, but always being stressed out at home because I couldn't afford anything has left an impression on me. I don't know if it is a good thing yet, but that is where I am at at this point. I can deal with being stressed at my job, because I know that my home life will be better off in the long run. In the town of Augusta, Maine, you can buy a 3 bedroom, modular home on 1.5 acres of land for about $94,000. With a down payment of $9000, the mortgage payment works out to be about $873 a month. I was paying close to that in rent just about everywhere I went. And, it is only 43 miles from Portland, Maine, which is by far our best paying city. A person that works at McDonald's make $13 to start... The cost of living there is, I don't even know how to word it... A studio apartment I rented in 1997 was $1200 a month... So, there in lies working where the money is and living just close enough so that the commute doesn't suck too bad in the winter.


I don't have any great advice or anything, but I just wanted to take a moment to say, "I hear ya, man."
I watched my industry die this past year too, and also ended up jobless as a result. My response was to change fields as well, to follow one of the things I've really wanted to do for a while, to become a professional computer builder. I've done a great deal of that "on the side" and currently am working part time for a custom PC shop, building and repairing computers, but want to have my own business before the end of this year.

But like I said, my point was just to sympathize. Well, maybe not just that... it's sad to see your bread and butter vanish before your eyes, but I truly believe that for every door that closes, another one opens.
Thanks, IMI. I wish you well in your business. Let me know when you have it up and running, because I need a new computer desperately. If I am going to give my money to anyone, I would just assume give it to a fellow 'waver...:rock: I have always wanted to pursue something in the computer field. Since my days in high school. But, I always found something in the meantime. Now is my chance to do it, while there is nothing else out there at the moment. It is scary to look in the paper and see 4 or 5 listings, when there used to be 2 or 3 pages... But, like you said. The door to my last company is shut. There was nothing I could do about it. All of us tried our best to do whatever we had to do to keep the company running. But, it got to a point where the bank just didn't want to deal with it anymore. So, to move forward and look to the new doors that are opening is both exciting and scary.

Thank you to everyone that replied. I appreciate all the input. Hopefully, things will turn out in a couple of years for all of us and we can all be doing jobs that we love and be paid what we are worth.

MooseDog
05-09-2009, 07:49 PM
hi borkus;
first of all congratulations on making the commitment to further schooling when faced with a calamity like you described at snopro ( which btw also being in new england i've seen your work around. nice stuff!)

in the spirit of computer education, let me throw this thought out there for you to consider and research. i was just talking to my neighbor yesterday and learned what she is studying at school: computer forensics. she's attending champlain college in burlington, vt and is close to getting her bachelors in computer forensics. i asked her what the market for that is, and she was very excited about it's current and future potential.

just a thought, congratulations on your go get'em approach adn continued success.

borkus
05-09-2009, 08:52 PM
Thanks Moosedog. I will certainly check into that. Burlington isn't all that far away. And, I have heard good things about that college in past years.

ted
05-09-2009, 09:38 PM
Borkus, I just came across this and I'm sorry to hear about the closure. A lot of good companies went down recently. It almost got me, but I managed to leverage my way through. In the last few months I'm seeing the benefits of hanging in there.

As for your future potential, Computers will be one of the safest fields to be in for decades and beyond. As long as you keep educating yourself that long. :thumbsup:
There are countless directions you can go which is what makes that field so great. You can live in any part of the country you choose. You can change jobs and alter your career to any part of any industry as you desire.
I'm sure you've heard it before, but sometimes that door that closes opens up new doors with more potential.
I wish you the best of luck! :thumbsup:

Hopper
05-09-2009, 11:48 PM
There are countless directions you can go which is what makes that field so great. You can live in any part of the country you choose. You can change jobs and alter your career to any part of any industry as you desire.
So true, so true. I've been in this business since the early 80's and I can attest to that. I've done computer assembly, support, programming, network engineering, consulting, and a myriad of other related tasks in between. The field definately keeps you on your toes and requires constant education to keep up. It just keeps getting bigger and bigger. You can do just about anything you like or specialize in just a handful of technologies. It's all out there and you'll definately never get bored. There's always something new around the corner.

DiedonD
05-10-2009, 01:27 AM
I have researched this a bit. The thing that I keep finding is that being paid for your services can be a constant problem. Much easier to get screwed on the net than in person. This, coupled that there are many countries that are very willing to do the same work for a lot less than we would expect in America.


Well, the condition was to get a yearly contract of no less then 24k US$, that would ensure a monthly payment to your bank abroad, while you would work online from abroad.

The payment insured in the contract for your work! Your courts would enforce the agreement and penalize alot faster if they would try to screw you! Right? So they seem on movies the least! Otherwise the whole deal of working online from abroad doesnt works of course.



I don't picture leaving the country, but I'm always open to that idea. I was in the military, and have many friends that were as well or did a lot of traveling. And, the consensus that all of us agree with is that Americans are not very well liked abroad. While this may be different in your country, it is the norm in many others.


Yes indeed.

And Id like you and others to know that, and never forget it!

Also its not a 'may be different in your country' but its a 'while this is 180 degrees definitely different in your country (Kosova Republic)'

Best and Good luck :thumbsup:

lwaddict
05-11-2009, 08:09 AM
Sorry if I repeat anything but I didn't read the whole thread, just the starter post...

My title, believe it or not, is Multimedia Producer/Sys Admin and it started as a simple graphic designer position.

I can tell you from experience that fixing computer doesn't pay, the field is loaded with people claiming to know how to do it but just flop once they are put into the position to run a building, website, network, phones, etc...

I got lucky.
I'm doing very well.
But a buddy of mine just finished 2.5 years of study and got his degree in system admin... took him 6 months to get a job and he now makes roughly 20% of what I make.
As a matter of fact, if I was pushed out of my job, I'd be hard pressed to make even remotely what I make in today's market.

So...
if you aren't going to make some serious dough...
then be an end user, not a tech.
At least you'll be enjoying what you do.

Good luck with your endeavors though no matter which way you go.

Hang in there,

LW

steamthunk
05-12-2009, 12:29 PM
Hey there. Sorry to hear about the closure. Yeah, it's always fine to say it's not about the money until you don't have any. I'm not sure yet from reading the OP and responses (admittedly skimming some of the longer ones) what are your occupation intents upon graduation. From a computer programming standpoint, I will just mention that based on my interviewer and interviewee experiences people the degree is a checklist item. A great degree from a great school (e.g. Stanford, CMU, MIT) attracts attention, but otherwise it's just something that people expect to see. So I think the schooling is worth it, but don't expect that to necessarily open all the doors. I did find I got job leads through school prior to graduation so that helped.

In the end people want applicable experience. If you're willing to build up to it and not expect a high salary to start it's do-able and software development is still not a bad industry. I don't think game development (unless that's exactly what you want to do) is representative of corporate software development. Yes, you can get insane companies, but by and large I don't know any people in the software industry that are absolutely killing themselves working.

borkus
05-12-2009, 06:16 PM
My direction at this point is very open-ended. I want to move into the technology sector, and have been told that the medical field is where to make the money. At this point, that is my goal. After talking with a couple of the professors at the college, this course is certainly just a priimer. But, they have a very good reputation in this state and do very well with placing students. I will take whatever I can get after graduation. From there, hopefully it is a job that is flexible. One that I can take further classes in. While being a tech is not what I had in mind, my goal is to find a job that pays well eventually. I had not worded that correctly in my op or following posts. The field I just came from had a salary cap. You reach a certain point, and you might as well leave. Not something I want to deal with again. And, the reason for going to school is also because of my last job. I learned many things there. I had to make some of the blueprints on some of our more complex trailers, because I had more hands on than the engineer. I did much of the electrical wiring (120 and 240 volt), some of the propane, plumbing... All this stuff that I can't take with me to another job. That was what I first pursued when they shut the doors. But, everyone told me that it didn't matter that they knew that I knew how to do it. It only meant that I didn't have a certificate or degree behind it. I had even done some of the work for some of these companies through our trailers. They came to my mill and shook my hand saying I was doing an awesome job. But,when applying to work for them, "too bad, so sad...". So, to start off in getting a degree in technology and moving on from that point is what I have come up with for a game plan. This time, I will get those little pieces of paper that I can take with me this time.