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View Full Version : Is 3D software included with tuition at an animation school?



shrox
04-16-2009, 07:02 AM
A question for those that know, do you get a personal copy (educational, full or whatever) of the software you are learning when you sign up and attend an school that teaches animation?

Nicolas Jordan
04-16-2009, 07:09 AM
No schools that I am aware of do this. I took advantage of educational pricing for Lightwave when I attended but still had to fork over $800 for it at the time I think if I remember right.

RebelHill
04-16-2009, 07:11 AM
no... not taht ive ever heard of... but if its a recognised, accredited school, then your proof of studentship (thats not a word is it??) gets u the educational discount on whatever software you're buying...

also... beware of animation courses, theres WAY too many that teach a particular software, but somehow manage to not teach that much about animation yet dont see the difference.

akademus
04-16-2009, 07:14 AM
Animation Mentor gives you significant discount on purchasing Maya and other complementary softwares. FXPHD lets you use their licenses through VPN, which is a great solution.

Don't know about others.

shrox
04-16-2009, 07:21 AM
In another thread I mentioned taking your stuff home to work on it, I assumed that it was included in your tuition. When I went to art school, one full set of pens, pencils, comp markers, ruler, triangle etc was included, as well as a starter pack of darkroom supplies for the stat camera.

AdamAvenali
04-16-2009, 07:41 AM
also... beware of animation courses, theres WAY too many that teach a particular software, but somehow manage to not teach that much about animation yet dont see the difference.

i have to agree 100%. i went to Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and we did not receive software, though with my student ID i got the educational price from Academic Superstore. we had a very strong traditional animation department with some very qualified professors who did a great job teaching the fundamentals of animation. it wasn't until a couple of semesters in that i actually got to use any software.

sorry about the plug haha but i feel it is a great school that is often overlooked because it is a small rural PA state school, but they are very selective about their professors.

beverins
04-16-2009, 08:07 AM
I think Pratt Institute has an agreement for free licenses with some thick strings attached, but I could be wrong.

shrox
04-16-2009, 08:24 AM
Iwould think that the school could cover the $100 or so for the software, especially it the course is thousands of dollars, and then kick in the Pell grant.

AdamAvenali
04-16-2009, 08:45 AM
my relative got a pretty sweet cooking set when he started culinary school. it was a suitcase full of utensils haha

Johnny
04-16-2009, 08:50 AM
also... beware of animation courses, theres WAY too many that teach a particular software, but somehow manage to not teach that much about animation yet dont see the difference.

well-said, and good that you contributed that, rebel..

I taught for one semester at one of those "art academies..." basically a crank-em-out vocational school for kids who think that a career in eye-popping graphics-making is for them.

there was little attention to art issues, almost none given to concept. the kids simply wanted to know which buttons to hit to make effects they thought were cool, and the school pandered to that.


to be frank, if any such student came to me looking for a gig, I'd prbly hand her/him a broom and point to the floor.

these days, your average pet fish knows how to whap buttons on an electronic device. what the world actually needs is conceptual thinkers.


J

shrox
04-16-2009, 09:03 AM
well-said, and good that you contributed that, rebel..

I taught for one semester at one of those "art academies..." basically a crank-em-out vocational school for kids who think that a career in eye-popping graphics-making is for them.

there was little attention to art issues, almost none given to concept. the kids simply wanted to know which buttons to hit to make effects they thought were cool, and the school pandered to that.


to be frank, if any such student came to me looking for a gig, I'd prbly hand her/him a broom and point to the floor.

these days, your average pet fish knows how to whap buttons on an electronic device. what the world actually needs is conceptual thinkers.


J

Exactly, or as I am learning to say here in the UK, spot on.

AdamAvenali
04-16-2009, 09:16 AM
and if anyone is looking for someone to speak to their class about how much learning some traditional art can help their animation i can help haha i used to despise waking up early and going to drawing or painting because i lacked skill in those areas and all i could think was "how is this helping me? i'm hating it and it's not teaching me anything. all i wanted to do was get to my software classes, but now that i have been out of college for a few years, i catch myself thinking about those classes and theories when it comes time to start a new project, everything from anatomy to color theory to composition. a good base is definitely the place to start. personally, i feel software should be the last step.

dweinkauf
04-16-2009, 09:22 AM
As the founder of the animation program and computer animation courses at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, I can tell you our emphasis has always been on creating the artist first. Our program was set up so there is a grounding in all of the arts followed by animation courses that stress the fundamentals of animation. All of this before the students start thinking about pushing those fancy software buttons. The proof is in the pudding. The list of feature film credits by our graduates covers three single-space pages. One of our graduates even directed the Star Wars: Clone Wars feature and is now directing the TV series. He had almost no exposure to computer animation while at Edinboro, but was well trained in traditional animation.

shrox
04-16-2009, 09:27 AM
As the founder of the animation program and computer animation courses at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, I can tell you our emphasis has always been on creating the artist first. Our program was set up so there is a grounding in all of the arts followed by animation courses that stress the fundamentals of animation. All of this before the students start thinking about pushing those fancy software buttons. The proof is in the pudding. The list of feature film credits by our graduates covers three single-space pages. One of our graduates even directed the Star Wars: Clone Wars feature and is now directing the TV series. He had almost no exposure to computer animation while at Edinboro, but was well trained in traditional animation.

It's all about having the right stuff. Both my sisters are artists, and so was my mother. I was never wanting for pencils or paper!

AdamAvenali
04-16-2009, 09:40 AM
As the founder of the animation program and computer animation courses at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, I can tell you our emphasis has always been on creating the artist first. Our program was set up so there is a grounding in all of the arts followed by animation courses that stress the fundamentals of animation. All of this before the students start thinking about pushing those fancy software buttons. The proof is in the pudding. The list of feature film credits by our graduates covers three single-space pages. One of our graduates even directed the Star Wars: Clone Wars feature and is now directing the TV series. He had almost no exposure to computer animation while at Edinboro, but was well trained in traditional animation.

Dave! i was hoping you would see my post and plug some more info. this is definitely one of those cases of "i know who you are, but we never actually formally met." i didnt know how much you actually still float around the forums here. i graduated in 2006 so if you have a few minutes, feel free to send me a PM as i would like to know how the program and Steve are doing these days.

dweinkauf
04-16-2009, 10:44 AM
Adam,

Good to hear from you. Even though I retired in 2003 to run a non-profit, I still keep in touch with the place. Steve and the program are doing great. A year ago, his Lightwave students did a 360 degree, 7-screen animated piece and last semester did the first Lightwave 3D piece using glasses. A month ago, his class, along with the theater arts, film/video, music, graphic arts areas put together a piece where President Brown was Batman taking on the bad guys and arriving as President Brown at the luncheon honoring Michael Uslan (producer of Batman). An entire city along with the bat mobile and bat plane were created and animated in Lightwave in less than a month. That same week, we honored our graduate who directed Clone Wars with an alumni award via a live hookup with Lucasfilm. R2 D2 even made an appearance during his acceptance speech. The film/video area just got a large infusion of money to buy HD equipment including Speed Edit and Final Cut Pro software and two Red One cameras. So, things are pretty exciting at Edinboro. Keep in touch.

Dave

AbnRanger
04-16-2009, 01:00 PM
A question for those that know, do you get a personal copy (educational, full or whatever) of the software you are learning when you sign up and attend an school that teaches animation?I know online degree programs like Westwood College and I assume Art Institute (of Pittsburgh) provides software because the student has no other means to use the software..since they don't have a campus to attend (which supplies the computers and software).
But it is part of the overall cost. One could make a case that part of your tuition pays for the hardware and software for on campus schools anyway, so there may not be any real difference.
Although they can differ from campus to campus, the Southern California branches of the Art Institute have really good reputations. Most of the instructors have or still work in the film industry here. The campus at the Inland Empire (San Bernardino) has life drawing and environment/matte background painting classes that are pretty intense.

Dexter2999
04-16-2009, 01:10 PM
Any school could but won't if they don't have to. It's money the school can spend elsewhere.

If nothing else they could give to the student and bill for it under a "lab fee".

Titus
04-16-2009, 02:30 PM
I'm at animation mentorr right now, I have access to buy an educational Maya license.

Dexter2999
04-16-2009, 02:34 PM
I bought my EDU license from 3D garage when I purchased Dan Ablans training course.