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donx
04-15-2009, 06:38 PM
:help:
I've finished editing another orchestra performance shot HDV 1080i and edited on an HD timeline. In the past I successfully burned a 720x480 16x9 DVD with Encore. That was months ago and I didn't make enough notes on the process. I can't seem to find the right formula for creating this new one.
My problem is the interlace flicker. It looks great playing in Speed Edit but somewhere in the process it gains jerky moves and interlace distortion on the fine lines.

:bangwall:
I've tried rendering a scaled down version from a HD project and also a sub-project opened and rendered in a SD timeline.(even tried with ISS on the clips and high quality scaling)
I've tried rendering to MPEG2 (both interlaced and progressive) at 7Mbps. Also tried rendering to Blackmagic 10bit 4:2:2 .avi which reads well in Encore.

Any suggestions as to the proper workflow needed????
Maybe I should have started by shooting in 1080p???

thanks for the magic bullet :help:

donx
04-16-2009, 07:51 PM
I've been searching the web and discovered a method that looks really good on DVD.
Using VirtualDub to make the .avi saved from Speed Edit into progressive, resized to 720x480 and sharpened with it's filters.
Then, using Encore to stretch it to 16x9 and burn to DVD.

It got rid of almost all of the interlace problems and retained most of the sharpness.

donx
04-21-2009, 12:28 AM
Since this thread may be used as education for someone I thought I should conclude that using Encore to encode for DVD from my .avi wasn't looking as good as the version I encoded to mpeg2, using TMPGEnc
I finally bought a copy and it has much more control, especially for fast moving dancers.:thumbsup:

It took a few days to experiment but I think I now have a workflow. It takes Four programs to accomplish the perfect DVD
SpeedEdit
VirtualDub
TMPEGEnc
Encore

Is there a more direct path??:screwy:

Pete Draves
04-21-2009, 01:04 AM
There are may work flows that are faster, but they lose quality.
You have a good work flow.
Best quality.
Pete

Dufusyte
04-21-2009, 01:07 PM
It takes Four programs to accomplish the perfect DVD

SpeedEdit
VirtualDub
TMPEGEnc
Encore

Is there a more direct path?? :screwy:
I bet you could use TMPEGEnc to do the VirtualDub part. TMPEGEnc has some good filters, and it can bring HD footage down to SD nicely without flicker and still retain sharpness. Actually it's pretty easy to retain sharpness when downsizing from HD to SD.

So, you should be able to go like this:

SpeedEdit: Save As avi (wrapper), 1920x1080 (or 1440x1080 if HDV)
TMPEGEnc: load the avi, apply Filters (e.g. Deinterlace, Resize), encode to SD mpg
DVD Application: load mpg, load wav (you can have SE produce the wav) and burn to DVD.

donx
04-21-2009, 02:54 PM
I bet you could use TMPEGEnc to do the VirtualDub part. TMPEGEnc has some good filters, and it can bring HD footage down to SD nicely without flicker and still retain sharpness. Actually it's pretty easy to retain sharpness when downsizing from HD to SD.
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I haven't been able to gain control of the de-interlacing feature in TMPEGEnc.
In VirtualDub is offered a 'Blend' mode which is far superior to throwing away one field. In combination with increasing the sharpness to 10, I was able to get a really smooth motion with no interlace lines.

Dufusyte
04-23-2009, 09:24 PM
donx, you are welcome to try the attached Template for TMPEGEnc4; unzip and drop it into My Documents\TMPGEnc\TMPGEnc 4.0 XPress\Template\Filter, and then inside TMPGEnc on the Filter page you can select "Open Template" and select "HD_to_DVD".

This filter consists in:

Deinterlace: (Always,ByTop,InterpolationAdjusted)
AntiFlickering: (Enabled,Strength256)
VideoNoiseReduction: (Enabled,StillPic25,RangeShortest;Time=NotEnabled)
PictureResize: (Center,720x480,Normal,HighQuality)

Hope this helps.

LittleSpig04
01-18-2010, 11:03 PM
I have posted this many times and I still can't get the right settings. I even got into a verbal fight with a client today because they were so upset about the quality of their wedding video. OK, so here I go again!!!!

I film in HD and downconvert the footage and use an SD timeline. I have VT4 with speed edit but my system is too slow to edit HD. SO, footage is SD on my timeline and I am having a hard time figuring out the best render setting to have a decent looking picture on an HDTV. Is this even possible? I feel like I've tried everything.

I have tried TMPEG but probably not with the correct settings. And it took FOREVER to render an hour of video.

Can someone tell me how to take HD converted footage and make it look non-blurry and decent for my HDTV?

Dufusyte
01-19-2010, 01:19 PM
I film in HD and downconvert the footage and use an SD timeline. [...] my system is too slow to edit HD, so footage is SD on my timeline
To preserve quality, the first rule is to keep the data as rich as possible as long as possible in your workflow pipeline. That means, keep in in HD (HDV) through the entire process, and only downconvert in the last stage when you do your final production render.

If you downconvert as the first step, and edit in SD, then any viaual adjustments you do to the footage (changes in brightness, contrast, effect like bloom etc) are likely to create visual artifacts.

I would recommend purchasing a computer which can edit HDV, especially if this is your profession. It is simply a necessity if you want to retain quality.

If you must edit in SD, then I would suggest not applying adjustments to the video (see above), and/or do apply a slight blur or noise reduction filter on your final render.

You can probably write off a computer purchase if it is used exclusively for your business.

Dufusyte
01-19-2010, 01:20 PM
...and remember you can degrade the preview video settings in SpeedEdit, which might make it easier for you to edit HD on slow hardware.

janello
01-19-2010, 02:49 PM
If you are going to deliver in SD DVD and your system is pretty slow, I would strongly suggest filming in SD with your HD camera if possible. I have a FX1000 Sony and will probably always shoot SD when producing SD DVDs. I think the quality is pretty good and alot less trouble. It is possible to get better quality from HD master, but most of the time I don't think my clients can tell the difference. When I switch to Blu-Ray in the future, I will need to shoot and edit in HDV, but now I am taking the easy way.