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shrox
03-31-2009, 08:58 AM
Here in England I see something at the store (shop) called "toad in a hole". Sounds scary, what is it?

*Pete*
03-31-2009, 08:59 AM
dont eat it...its that typical english humour to trick foreigners to eat all kinds of crazy things...

biliousfrog
03-31-2009, 09:09 AM
haha...it's the food of kings!

It's sausage in a yorkshire pudding (which is made from batter) and is usually served with vegetables and gravey. Almost like a crispy sausage pancake.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-toad-in-the-hole

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 09:38 AM
So Shrox, is english food really as bad as I've heard. :)

shrox
03-31-2009, 09:47 AM
So Shrox, is english food really as bad as I've heard. :)

I suppose it all depends upon where you go. The fish and chip shop around the corner from my house makes great cheeseburgers. The lasagna I had at a pub was good too, although a little bland. I guess spicy foods aren't that popular here. Mostly we cook at home.

wp_capozzi
03-31-2009, 10:55 AM
When I was there I had some great spicy curry vegetables, and I thought beans and toast were pretty good too. Lots of chips, mmm.

shrox
03-31-2009, 10:58 AM
What I find odd here is that a bacon sandwich has butter on it.

Nangleator
03-31-2009, 10:59 AM
Butter on bacon... Dear god. Explosive diarrhea time!

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 11:06 AM
Lots of curry I guess. Can't go wrong with curry.

shrox
03-31-2009, 11:11 AM
Lots of curry I guess. Can't go wrong with curry.

Curry. I lived for six months in a apartment that reeked of curry. It was just too much.

cresshead
03-31-2009, 11:17 AM
deep fried mars bar....:devil:
pork scratchings....:D
hedgehog crisps...:hey:
black pudding:eek:

cresshead
03-31-2009, 11:19 AM
chip buttie!:thumbsup:

Welsh rarebit:)

cresshead
03-31-2009, 11:20 AM
spotted dick....

colkai
03-31-2009, 11:29 AM
What I find odd here is that a bacon sandwich has butter on it.

Darn straight! Better have Brown Sauce on it too. :D
(Ideally also with an egg and a couple of sausage...MMmmmmm)

Ohh, batter deep fried spam - a guilty pleasure of mine. :)

cagey5
03-31-2009, 12:32 PM
Black pudding is wonderful. Never tried Tripe myself though people swear it's tasty and jellied eels have never appealed. Maybe it's because I'm not a Londoner... I'm sure there's a tune in there somewhere.

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 12:37 PM
What is brown sauce? I was making a recipe the other day and it called for brown sauce. I had no idea what it was, or what the equivelant would be state side.

cagey5
03-31-2009, 12:38 PM
This is what we generally mean..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_Sauce

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 12:50 PM
sounds a lot like bulldog sauce or tonkatsu sauce in Japan, tangy, sweet, rich and fruity.

BeeVee
03-31-2009, 01:50 PM
It is pretty like tonkatsu sauce. Here in the southwest of France we eat a lot of gesiers, which translates literally as gizzards.

B

biliousfrog
03-31-2009, 03:49 PM
Another popular brand of 'brown' sauce is Daddies which would probably raise a few eyebrows in other countries, 'can I have some daddies sauce in my burger' for example.

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 04:03 PM
I'm sure I would like it then because I love tonkatsu sauce.

Tobian
03-31-2009, 04:11 PM
What?! We have some of the finest food in the world here... other people's mostly LOL I am surprised you are finding it hard to find something you like here! :)

Now go find some haggis! :D I wouldn't eat that :D

Andyjaggy
03-31-2009, 04:12 PM
Or steak tartar. Uck.

borkus
03-31-2009, 04:32 PM
Haggis is friggin' disgusting... Had the mispleasure of trying that this year. I work with a guy who is from Ireland, and they have some kind of ritual every year on St. Patrick's day. He brought some in for me to try. I should have known by the expression on his face when he ate it. And, it looks disgusting too. Strange ritual those guys have. He also wore his kilt in to work.

Tobian
03-31-2009, 04:36 PM
Kilt, Haggis, St Patricks day, Irish... something does not compute :D

kopperdrake
03-31-2009, 05:14 PM
Haggis is gorgeous! You need to find a decent carvery too - a pub that does a proper Sunday Lunch - roast beef, roast potatoes (food of kings), Yorkshire pudding, roast parsnips and some bread sauce. Or even better, belly draft of pork, scrumptious :D

And absolutely nothing in my opinion in all of Europe can beat our steamed suet and milk puddings...Spotted Dick, Treacle Sponge, Jam Roly Poly - all with custard of course, and not some dodgy fancied up custard, got to be Bird's Custard with proper milk - full-fat or gold-top if you can get it.

If you're ever up this way then our local specialities are Stilton cheese and pork pies...another thing I would so miss - pork pie with Branston Pickle...slurp.

To be honest, English food is not fancy, and it is *really* important to taste traditional English food made with decent ingredients. A good shepherd's pie made with home-grown potatoes, and a decent variety like Kestrel as opposed to some force-grown supermarket variety, and some good free-range Longhorn beef mince and the taste is scrumptious. Always worth finding a decent pub that sells decent English food - but they're so rare with the chain pubs serving up pre-cooked stuff :(

dballesg
03-31-2009, 05:43 PM
I guess spicy foods aren't that popular here. Mostly we cook at home.

Check the number of Indian restaurants there and then you tell me they do not like spicy food :D



To be honest, English food is not fancy, and it is *really* important to taste traditional English food made with decent ingredients.

That is true for ANY recipe on ANY country! :)


A good shepherd's pie made with home-grown potatoes, and a decent variety like Kestrel as opposed to some force-grown supermarket variety, and some good free-range Longhorn beef mince and the taste is scrumptious. Always worth finding a decent pub that sells decent English food - but they're so rare with the chain pubs serving up pre-cooked stuff :(

Fishermans pie it's one of my favourites as well! :)

David

shrox
04-01-2009, 03:20 AM
Check the number of Indian restaurants there and then you tell me they do not like spicy food :D...

I was born in Arizona, so I equate spicy with Mexican food. I really miss Sonoran style. There are many spices in Mexican food, Indian food seems to center around curry.

Tobian
04-01-2009, 03:42 AM
Hardly! For one thing, try a Balti, which is especially popular in the midlands, though you can get them everywhere now. We have Mexican restaurants here too, though you may not have many where you are. Was just out on Monday night for Tepan Yaki, LOVE Japanese Food! :D

You'll have to get to a bigger town/City to try a real sampling of what you can get, food wise, in the UK. As has been mentioned most 'pub meals' are just re-heated nasty!

biliousfrog
04-01-2009, 03:49 AM
I was born in Arizona, so I equate spicy with Mexican food. I really miss Sonoran style. There are many spices in Mexican food, Indian food seems to center around curry.

Not at all, we eat Indian quite regularly but neither myself or my girlfriend likes curries. It's a very diverse food, lots of subtle flavours and textures from cool and creamy to blow your head off...although many of the really hot dishes are purely British inventions.

We used to live near a Mexican/Cajun restaurant in Yorkshire, it was nice but pretty much 2 or 3 dishes served differently, ie. meat on it's own, rolled in a tortilla, folded in a tortilla, fried in a tortilla or served in a taco - with beans. :D

UK food tends to be quite heavy and stodgy but it's also very regional. We used to have a lot of fish restaurants here but the industry has gone now, we still get a lot of fresh produce from the local farms though.

The great thing about the UK is that there's also an abundance of foreign restaurants because of the amount of immigration over the years. You'll find certain pockets of Italians where they were held during WW2 and didn't go home, there's loads in Yorkshire near the old camp in Malton which means that the Italian restaurants are amazing...none of this dowey processed pizza and salad bar pasta - proper food. There's also the Indian and Chinese restaurants, I'm not talking take-aways, the freshly cooked stuff. Most towns and cities will have Tapas, Morrocan, Turkish, French...lots of East European places opening too because of the amount of illegal immigrants sneaking through.

DiedonD
04-01-2009, 03:51 AM
I was born in Arizona, so I equate spicy with Mexican food. I really miss Sonoran style. There are many spices in Mexican food, Indian food seems to center around curry.

Well the chillies that some spice hungry cousins of mine eat, the acid in them is enough to send an elephant to its knees! Ive tried a very small, tiny little piece chopped almost to a slice. And it got me running around!

I despise spicy food, and just cant understand why abuse yourself with it? If its about chilly than there is chily that its not hot!

Anyway, the oddest food I tasted was Tailand Soup! Though I stressed that it shouldnt be spicy, it still was. It had all kinda sea creatures in it, and they give you a very thick and heavy iron spoon, that you cant really fill it up much. See the soup comes at a hot iron dish. You use the spoon to take the soup away from it to your plate. So by giving you a shallow iron thick spoon, they are aiming for the idea, that youll press the sea creatures down, and squeeze the liquid out of them into that shallow spoon. If any parts get in the spoon, they can come out cause the spoon is too shallow to hold pieces, just liquid.

Anyway, while I was eating that soup, I started having electrification on my neck! And needed to rest, as all my muscles got under preasure, to the point of starting to hurt a bit at the shoulders. And I had a strange only right part of stomach aches! I had to lie down and rest for half an hour for those preasure feelings to go away, together with the electrification in my neck!

Oddest feeding experience ever!

kennez
04-01-2009, 04:42 AM
Some of the oddest food I have seen is where I am now, Guangdong Province, in Southern China. A number of the girls in my office regularly have a box of chicken feet for breakfast, if you can believe it!

As for spicy food, I really cannot stand it, but my wife is from a part of China that specializes in spicy stuff. Infact, it is some of the spiciest food is the world. Compared to this stuff, Mexican and curries are bland and boring! Some of the stuff she eats is what I would consider inedible (and some of the spirits that they drink here are unbelievable, around 65% strength).

shrox
04-01-2009, 04:47 AM
There are always exceptions, so take it with a grain of salt, or a dash of pepper, or a splash of tabasco, etc.

shrox
04-01-2009, 07:12 AM
What is bubble and squeak?

Tobian
04-01-2009, 07:19 AM
In deepest darkest Cornwall even google doesn't work ! :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_and_squeak

shrox
04-01-2009, 07:30 AM
In deepest darkest Cornwall even google doesn't work ! :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_and_squeak

Wikipedia is often wrong...

The dish in question I saw did not look like the picture you linked to. So it's basically leftovers?

Tobian
04-01-2009, 07:33 AM
Hehe yeah, though you will probably find that yes, it looks different depending on who makes it, and in a lot of cases it of course won't be leftovers, if it's being served in a restaurant! :)

SBowie
04-01-2009, 07:41 AM
Darn straight! Better have Brown Sauce on it too. :D
(Ideally also with an egg and a couple of sausage...MMmmmmm) Ohh, batter deep fried spam - a guilty pleasure of mine. :)Good grief - what is the average life expectancy - 12?

Tobian
04-01-2009, 07:44 AM
it's not like we eat them every day you know, except in Scotland, where yes the average life expectancy is about 12, you can blame deep fried battered Mars bars for that :D

I'd hate to live somewhere where all you could have is mung beans and ramen noodles all day :p

shrox
04-01-2009, 07:57 AM
Deep fried candy bars have been a staple food in the US south for years. Maybe I should have titled this thread "scary foods".

Titus
04-01-2009, 09:00 AM
We used to live near a Mexican/Cajun restaurant in Yorkshire, it was nice but pretty much 2 or 3 dishes served differently, ie. meat on it's own, rolled in a tortilla, folded in a tortilla, fried in a tortilla or served in a taco - with beans. :D

You're confusing Mexican with tex-mex (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tex-Mex_cuisine).

Mexican is (with Chinese and Indian) among the most elaborate cuisine in the world. A mole sauce recipe alone could have 20 varieties of peppers. Our recipies use almost any kind of insects, plants, animals and minerals. While it's true corn has an important role in our food, it's used for something more than wrapping stuff with a tortilla. As soon as the rainy season starts, I'm off for some creamy ant eggs, with a sidedish of huitlacoche (http://www.rollybrook.com/ar-huitlacoche.htm) (corn mushroom) crepes.

shrox
04-01-2009, 09:07 AM
Hey Titus, you're familiar with Sonoran then?

Nangleator
04-01-2009, 09:08 AM
Titus, what we have for "Mexican" "food" in New England is essentially a thick stew, with a few different variations, shoved inside, between or over a corn tortilla shell, and possibly baked again. The stew can be composed of chicken or beef, melted cheese, spices, optional rice, optional sour cream, optional guacamole, etc.

I knew by the time I was four that Mexican moms didn't feed that sort of stuff to their families.

I've had what is probably real Mexican cooking a few times. (Mexican family-owned restaurants.)

Titus
04-01-2009, 09:13 AM
Yes, Sonoran is one of the northern Mexico foods. A lot of good, thick meat (American cattle). There's a saying: at the north the culture ends, and the BBQ starts.

Tobian
04-01-2009, 09:17 AM
Well it's no different than any dish which is representative of a region/nation, when away from home, you 'improvise' using the best local ingredients, and a little bit of cultural blending takes place: Hence most pizzareas serve dishes which you wouldn't find in Italy, Most chinese restaurants don't serve dishes you would buy in China, and on and on! :) I love Japanese food, but i bet it's nothing like Japan, it's just our take on it! :)

On the flip side it also results in some interesting fusion in cultural styles: Dishes which you won't find at home, but are fantastic, like Chicken-Tikka-Massala, a peculiarly English-Indian fusion dish.

The only thing which dampens that really is when something is just part of a chain of restaurants, which results in predictable bland dishes. There are some exciting experimental restaurants arround the UK, and I am sure elsewhere too!

Titus
04-01-2009, 09:29 AM
I've had what is probably real Mexican cooking a few times. (Mexican family-owned restaurants.)

Yeah, someone tried to open Taco Bell restaurants here a few years ago, this was the dumbest idea ever. The problem with Mexican food is basically we have so many regions, we can't define this food easily. Most inmigrants in the US are from particular states, so they don't represent exactly all our food, and the materials aren't also the same. For some reason every taco in the US has cheddar cheese, we don't use that.

I was born in Chile, a country with a very limited and dull cuisine. My parents never got into the Mexican food, so it was only when I was in college started to eat Mexican, and it has been an incredible learning.

shrox
04-01-2009, 10:08 AM
...For some reason every taco in the US has cheddar cheese, we don't use that.

Actually many tiny (and authentic) taquerias in California and Arizona don't include cheese. Although I admit, I usually ask for it...

Andyjaggy
04-01-2009, 10:11 AM
so maybe I shouldn't dismess Mexican food so quickly. :)

It's never been my favorite and around here it just seems all the same, some beans, some rice, and a tortillas with some sort of meat and cheese in it.

I finally learned about mole and went to a restaurant in SLC that supposedly has the best mole around, I had some sort of pork stuffed with fruit and a mole sauce over it, it was pretty good, better then any Mexican I had before anyway.

Asian is still my favorite though.

shrox
04-01-2009, 10:39 AM
Unsweetened chocolate is in many "traditional" Mexican foods (like mole). It's pretty good.

MooseDog
04-01-2009, 11:27 AM
Unsweetened chocolate is in many "traditional" Mexican foods (like mole). It's pretty good.

careful with that one dude :), you're playing at the intersection of history/culture/mass marketing. don't want you to get run over:D.

i.p.o.f. there's no such thing as a "mole sauce" as mentioned above, as a mole *is* a sauce. it was the ancient aztec (mayan?) word for sauce. guaca-mole is a sauce made from the guac (avocado). now, cacao beans would have surely been used, considering their historical importance, but a "chocolate sauce" would have been highly unlikely, knowing that it was a dutchman who invented the process to change beans into chocolate:D.

as titus mentioned above, "mexican" cuisine covers a pretty big number of different cultures, histories and ingredients. like "chinese" it's one of the largest and most diverse food cultures on earth. and finding the real thing can be a pretty exciting.

Titus
04-01-2009, 12:05 PM
i.p.o.f. there's no such thing as a "mole sauce" as mentioned above, as a mole *is* a sauce. it was the ancient aztec (mayan?) word for sauce.

You're right but uncomplete. There's also another kind of mole, mole de olla (mole pot?). This is some sort of soup, spicy like mole but without chocolate.

Riff_Masteroff
04-01-2009, 06:13 PM
I have only one question for the group, as follows:
Are cats good to eat?

DiedonD
04-02-2009, 12:14 AM
I have only one question for the group, as follows:
Are cats good to eat?

Hey yoiu took the topic right out of my mind, and posted it faster than me :)

Good going :thumbsup:

Yeah, Cats!

Moose dog mentioning that Chinese food is most diverse an all, I rememebred that the Chinese opened up a restaurant here, and they were offering Cat Soup!

Anyone tried it! Is it as good as some guy here says that its good, after beeing fooled to try it, without the Chinese telling what was the soup made of first?!

kennez
04-02-2009, 12:31 AM
Anyone tried it! Is it as good as some guy here says that its good, after beeing fooled to try it, without the Chinese telling what was the soup made of first?!

My advice on this subject is that it's best not to ask what is in anything. food related in China. Living in China is really interesting when it comes to food. In most of the country, there is a saying about Guangdong Province: "The Cantonese will eat anything with 4 legs except a table, and anything that flies except a plane."

From my experience, this is so true. Some of the things are stomach-turning (fried cow brains and live goldfish anyone?)

DiedonD
04-02-2009, 12:41 AM
So did you tried Cat Soup Kennez?

Are you a Chinaman, or are just living in China?

Kennez sounds so similar to Kinez, that in Albanian means Chinaman!

Which on the other hand seems a bit odd to call you by your nationality!

Like, you there, Chinaman! Or you there, German! Its kinda, nationalistic :thumbsdow

kennez
04-02-2009, 01:25 AM
Never tried cat soup that I know of, but then again, I really have no idea what I'm eating most of the time! I just trust my wife to order for me.

In answer to your other question, no, I'm actually English, living and working in China. 3D is strictly a hobby at the moment, as I teach oral English at a college here. After the summer, hopefully, I will be working part time at the local university in the animation department though (along with my English job)

shrox
04-02-2009, 03:14 AM
careful with that one dude :), you're playing at the intersection of history/culture/mass marketing. don't want you to get run over:D.

i.p.o.f. there's no such thing as a "mole sauce" as mentioned above, as a mole *is* a sauce. it was the ancient aztec (mayan?) word for sauce. guaca-mole is a sauce made from the guac (avocado). now, cacao beans would have surely been used, considering their historical importance, but a "chocolate sauce" would have been highly unlikely, knowing that it was a dutchman who invented the process to change beans into chocolate:D.

as titus mentioned above, "mexican" cuisine covers a pretty big number of different cultures, histories and ingredients. like "chinese" it's one of the largest and most diverse food cultures on earth. and finding the real thing can be a pretty exciting.

The menu says mole, the jar in the store says mole, my friend's mom called it mole. It's mole. It's also the 21st century, and I don't see many aztecs around...

MooseDog
04-02-2009, 08:32 AM
...my friend's mom called it mole. ...

the ~Dog slinks humbly away, having been pwned! :D

gonna go get me some sweetbreads (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweetbread):thumbsup:

shrox
04-02-2009, 08:36 AM
the ~Dog slinks humbly away, having been pwned! :D

gonna go get me some sweetbreads (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweetbread):thumbsup:

Bad, bad, bad antlered dog!

dballesg
04-02-2009, 09:46 AM
fried cow brains and live goldfish anyone?)

Well no to the gold fish thanks! :)

But I do not need to go so far away to eat:

Fried Lamb Brains
Cow Tongue on fried tomato sauce
Fried Lamb Intestines (Zarajos)
Ox Tail Stew
Cow Stomach Stew (Callos a la Madrileņa)

The last three are on MY FAVOURITE food list :)

All those are tipical spanish food! :D

David

Nangleator
04-02-2009, 09:56 AM
Each of these exotic dishes seem like they must have great stories behind them. Stories that would start like this:

"He was starving to death and had no choice other than to..."

or

"She hated her husband so much, she prepared..."

or

"The group's horrendous initiation rites spawned this terrible culinary crime, which somehow caught on with the locals..."

Titus
04-02-2009, 10:15 AM
Cow Stomach Stew (Callos a la Madrileņa)
All those are tipical spanish food! :D

David

You know, in Mexico callos is a shellfish and in my first trip to Madrid once choose callos a la madrileņa.... ewwwww. Here is known as menudo (yes, like the boys group).

Captain Obvious
04-02-2009, 10:16 AM
I think the swedish fermented herring might claim the grand prize for weirdest thing ever. Or maybe the icelandic rotted shark...

Andyjaggy
04-02-2009, 10:38 AM
Japan is up there with some of the strangest foods. Nato. Fermented soy beans. Sick, just sick. Then to make it even worse they crack a raw egg over it and eat it with rice and mustard. Not only does it taste like what Satan would eat for breakfast it smells something terrible.

http://www.thesneeze.com/mt-archives/cat_steve_dont_eat_it.php

dballesg
04-02-2009, 10:44 AM
Each of these exotic dishes seem like they must have great stories behind them.

Not at all.

It is very simple, in the past, people were used to kill an animal and take advantage of all the meat from them.

Today every time I see one of those kids on a restaurant complaining about his chicken or lamb having "veins" on the meat, and the mother cutting the meat and taking them off, I will catch the kid, put him on a wardrobe and close the doors for a few days! :D And later serve him exactly the same dish :D

Worse is even the same kid eating a hamburger on a MCDonalds or similar place, and not question were the meat cames from! :devil:

David

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 12:47 AM
Today every time I see one of those kids on a restaurant complaining about his chicken or lamb having "veins" on the meat, and the mother cutting the meat and taking them off, I will catch the kid, put him on a wardrobe and close the doors for a few days! :D And later serve him exactly the same dish :D


Thats strange really!

Can you do that to another family's kid? Go to the table, take the kid, and close it somewhere!

Im saying cause its different cultures you know! You wouldnt dare do that here! If the kid disrespects you, you take them to the kids house, where his own parents would dael with the matter in their own way!

But even touching another families kid, might open up reactions towards you that could be alotta bad scenarios, even beeing shot at!

dballesg
04-03-2009, 02:29 AM
Thats strange really!

Can you do that to another family's kid? Go to the table, take the kid, and close it somewhere!

Im saying cause its different cultures you know! You wouldnt dare do that here! If the kid disrespects you, you take them to the kids house, where his own parents would dael with the matter in their own way!

But even touching another families kid, might open up reactions towards you that could be alotta bad scenarios, even beeing shot at!

Oh sorry I was meaning about spanish kids on spanish restaurants! :) And of course joking, it is one of those ideas that cross your mind with uneducated kids! :)

I will not enclose the kid, but it is not the first time I said a parent on a restaurant, "Please, control your kid" :) depending of course on what the kid was doing.

Many of the kids today (in spain) are loosing a lot of beneficial traditional food.

They do not eat salads, rice, or fish, or things like that. Much less a liver stake. And yes a liver stake from time to time it is not bad for you at all.

David

JBT27
04-03-2009, 02:44 AM
Haggis is gorgeous! You need to find a decent carvery too - a pub that does a proper Sunday Lunch - roast beef, roast potatoes (food of kings), Yorkshire pudding, roast parsnips and some bread sauce. Or even better, belly draft of pork, scrumptious :D

And absolutely nothing in my opinion in all of Europe can beat our steamed suet and milk puddings...Spotted Dick, Treacle Sponge, Jam Roly Poly - all with custard of course, and not some dodgy fancied up custard, got to be Bird's Custard with proper milk - full-fat or gold-top if you can get it.

If you're ever up this way then our local specialities are Stilton cheese and pork pies...another thing I would so miss - pork pie with Branston Pickle...slurp.

To be honest, English food is not fancy, and it is *really* important to taste traditional English food made with decent ingredients. A good shepherd's pie made with home-grown potatoes, and a decent variety like Kestrel as opposed to some force-grown supermarket variety, and some good free-range Longhorn beef mince and the taste is scrumptious. Always worth finding a decent pub that sells decent English food - but they're so rare with the chain pubs serving up pre-cooked stuff :(

This is what we're talking about ..... :D :thumbsup:

Julian.

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 02:45 AM
@Dballesg

Well one of our known dishes is Lungs prepared with onions. Its known throughout, from here to Turkiye. They call it 'Arnavut Cigeri' meaning Albanian Cousine Lungs.

Liver is good too. I know people that eat the sheeps eyes, brain, cheecks and such as a delicacy. I tried brain, was too soft for my taste, thus I dont like those facial muscles, appart from the tongue of course :tongue:

Anyway, thanks for clearing that up. The more we know right. Ive heard that in some cultures, an uncle can educate, even to the point of yelling or even beating his brothers children, and the same can happen the other way around. But a complete stranger family! It was something completely new for me!

shrox
04-03-2009, 03:02 AM
You people are sick, sick sick! I like biscuits and gravy (not cookies or crackers and gravy...) and cornbread and beans. I also like to make a quick casserole out of a can of chili and a box of macaroni and cheese.

Tobian
04-03-2009, 03:04 AM
Haha sarcasm does not always translate very well. I got what you meant dballesg hehe :D

Mmmmm all this talk of offal-food... mmmm it should help with my diet :D

Can't say I am a fan of such things. A few times my parents have tried to trick me into eating rabbit, pretending it's chicken.. it really does NOT taste the same :) and when my dad is boiling down rabbit bones to make soup... I need to leave the county! :D

JBT27
04-03-2009, 03:10 AM
The menu says mole, the jar in the store says mole, my friend's mom called it mole. It's mole. It's also the 21st century, and I don't see many aztecs around...

Then you're not looking in the right places ..... :hey:

Julian.

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 03:11 AM
Can't say I am a fan of such things. A few times my parents have tried to trick me into eating rabbit, pretending it's chicken.. it really does NOT taste the same :) and when my dad is boiling down rabbit bones to make soup... I need to leave the county! :D


Them bones actually go very well with Beans here. Beans with bones, or with goat tale, gives an added taste to the beans. And to overkill it with proteins, usually it comes with a chunk of meat aswell.

I like to have that, on the day when I excercize chest muscles, in bench press of 100Kg at my gym. A super proteininc meal like that, really does it!

Beans are similar everywhere. But was surprized to have US beans once. They were sweat to the contrary of sault and spicy here! Such a strange unnexpected taste! It was with tomato sauce and still tasted sweat! Is it so everywhere over there?

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 03:15 AM
You people are sick, sick sick! I like biscuits and gravy (not cookies or crackers and gravy...) and cornbread and beans. I also like to make a quick casserole out of a can of chili and a box of macaroni and cheese.


Sorry Shroxey :) But buscuits fails to fill in the Albanian belly adequately :D

A common diet is: alotta bread, and alotta fatt, with meat beeing the luxory main course, here.

I heard its different in China. Their main meal is rice, and use meat like a sauce thing at the sides!

shrox
04-03-2009, 03:28 AM
Sorry Shroxey :) But buscuits fails to fill in the Albanian belly adequately :D...

This is what I mean. And don't call me Shroxey, only women can call me that. Shirley you can do that...

Tobian
04-03-2009, 03:44 AM
Biscuits in gravy.. Kind of sounds like dog food :D

shrox
04-03-2009, 03:46 AM
Biscuits in gravy.. Kind of sounds like dog food :D

Bisuits AND gravy, that other is a cheap brand of dog food I think!

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 05:13 AM
This is what I mean. And don't call me Shroxey, only women can call me that. Shirley you can do that...

That looks like an awsome meal Shirley ;)

In fact if thats chicken with white sauce, I just had that yesterday and its delicious!

Where is the biscuit in them two pictures?

shrox
04-03-2009, 05:17 AM
That looks like an awsome meal Shirley ;)

In fact if thats chicken with white sauce, I just had that yesterday and its delicious!

Where is the biscuit in them two pictures?

The use of Shirley is a joke, as in, "Surely you can do that." "OK, but don't call me Shirley." It's a play on the English language, but if you already knew that, then surely you understand.

The biscuit is covered with gravy. Perhaps served by a waitress named Shirley...

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 05:26 AM
The use of Shirley is a joke, as in, "Surely you can do that." "OK, but don't call me Shirley." It's a play on the English language, but if you already knew that, then surely you understand.

The biscuit is covered with gravy. Perhaps served by a waitress named Shirley...

Oh so I c. K, how about your real name? :)

Dont tell me its Steven again! This place is so crowded with Steven! Im afraid that if yours is also, Im going to have to keep a seperate list with all ya Stevens out there, so as I dont get confused and address you with each others facets!

shrox
04-03-2009, 05:29 AM
Oh so I c. K, how about your real name? :)

Dont tell me its Steven again! This place is so crowded with Steven! Im afraid that if yours is also, Im going to have to keep a seperate list with all ya Stevens out there, so as I dont get confused and address you with each others facets!

My real name is Shrock.

DiedonD
04-03-2009, 05:40 AM
My real name is Shrock.

Cool

That was rather short and precize...