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jameswillmott
03-22-2009, 05:46 AM
After authoring the Introduction to Node Based Surfacing DVD (http://www.kurvstudios.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=LW-T034-001&Category_Code=01-02-01) for Kurv studios a few years ago I've had a lot of requests for a followup DVD that goes into a little more depth. I already have a plan I was going to follow, but I'm throwing a request out there... if you wanted a DVD on nodes, what would you like to see covered? I was intending to cover displacement as well as surfacing, and don't have a problem with covering third party nodes where they are appropriate to be used.

Tell me what you think, so I know how to tune the subject matter accordingly.

Thanks!

Psyhke
03-22-2009, 02:55 PM
I'm sure you'd get a wide variety of requests, but here are my thoughts:

1. Creative use examples - I loved the NPR techniqes you illustrated in HDRI3D. I'm familiar by now with the general usage of most (certainly not all) of the nodes, and would pay for more examples that put the nodes to creative use, such as that article.

2. Rays/Vectors - Anything to do with rays (raycast, vector maths, spot info channels, etc), and how to use and understand them better.

3. Third party - Examples with third party nodes is a good too, IMO. There's a lot of interesting things that could be shown if throwing them in the mix.

bryguy
03-22-2009, 03:05 PM
I will be very interested to see what is covered... good luck with that!

I dont think it would be worth doing without the use of thirt party nodes!

Netvudu
03-23-2009, 09:27 AM
Definitely go for displacements as well. Thatīs a big pandoraīs box if dealt with it properly.

Shading-wise I think that some real world examples with photoreal results always help. Most people can reach the "barely similar" results by themselves, but when you need to go much deeper into nodes for the last fraction of realism (i.e. say get another layer of specularity and decide if itīs anisotropic or which kind it is, or add SSS to the mix) is where most people tend to get discouraged.
Overall, a general strategy for clobbering the creation of a real-world material from scratch when one of the stock ones wonīt work or solve your case, would be great.

Cageman
03-23-2009, 09:45 AM
Alot of DPKit/Node Item Motion is covered here...

http://www.spinquad.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25031

MooseDog
03-24-2009, 06:29 PM
...2. Rays/Vectors - Anything to do with rays (raycast, vector maths, spot info channels, etc), and how to use and understand them better.

3. Third party - Examples with third party nodes is a good too, IMO. There's a lot of interesting things that could be shown if throwing them in the mix.

:thumbsup: on both points, but especially the first. thx james!

jameswillmott
03-24-2009, 06:52 PM
Alot of DPKit/Node Item Motion is covered here...

http://www.spinquad.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25031

A good selection there, no need to go over the same ground is there? :)

Cageman
03-24-2009, 07:03 PM
A good selection there, no need to go over the same ground is there? :)

Generally, I think that most people would benefit from surfacing videos. I get the feeling that too many users are still hanging onto the layer system for shading. Their usual response is that they can get things done faster... on the other hand, I'm quite sure that with some practice, they can get as fast in the Node shader.

People really need to get to the grips with nodes, especially now we now that CORE will be a nodebased system.

jameswillmott
03-24-2009, 07:21 PM
Generally, I think that most people would benefit from surfacing videos. I get the feeling that too many users are still hanging onto the layer system for shading. Their usual response is that they can get things done faster... on the other hand, I'm quite sure that with some practice, they can get as fast in the Node shader.


Nodes take more clicks than Layers, so I have a series of prebuilt basic node setups that I use, makes surfacing almost as fast as layers... adding 'layers' in a node interface is somewhat slower than layers but nodes will always be more flexible. That's where their power lies.



People really need to get to the grips with nodes, especially now we now that CORE will be a nodebased system.

I agree 100%

jasonwestmas
03-24-2009, 08:30 PM
Eh James! Thanks for your help as always. I never got around to watching your nodal video but I've read a lot of your examples on this forum and I usually use the book called LW9 Texturing by Angel Nieves for technical referance. If I was looking for something specific in a surfacing video:

I tend to have trouble with the fine details when using Specular, Bump and Normal UV texture maps and combining them with nodal setups, you know, those little things that give the image a real punch. Usually I have to rely on the Fprime previewer to get anything to look real and dimensional looking, verses flat and generic in that materialistic sense. Sometimes I don't really understand how to gain FULL control over how to make a hyper-real image, and any amount of success I have comes about through A LOT of trial and error and through FPrime previews. I think that a lot of time could be saved on my part if I could understand some more techniques that professionals use, techniques that seem to usually give a great starting point from which to build a surface.

Of course you know Fprime doesn't work with all nodes and hardly at all with the 9.6 nodes making things very time consuming. I know from painting in 2D that it's the little subtle details and shifts in hue/values that create something dimensional, materialistically accurate and not flat/ generic. Trouble comes into play when I don't fully understand the values of the nodal layers themselves and the render settings including lights, there are so many of them now. Any advice I would look for would therefore be in a materialistic kind of context. Creating great looking metals, fibers, skin, animal hide, rocks, liquids, glass etc. This may sound trivial to some but when we combine these materials into a subjective context, things get visually complicated and the need to differentiate one material from another becomes increasingly difficult. I know that a lot of these things include a lot of different attributes and many tiny hints of value adjustment. It's those little details and hints of differentiation that make materials stand out the most. Anything that could help bring those little things to life would be greatly interesting to me.