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steamthunk
03-17-2009, 11:13 AM
When doing hard surface modeling do people generally try to maintain the tri/quad format? It's ridiculously easy with to get n-gons when using rounder (for example). I've noticed n-gons can do some weird things at render, but planning for tris/quads seem more difficult for me when not in sub-patch mode. I'm generally loathe to do anything out of sub-patch but its just not very efficient for hard surfaces and I want to practice more with "regular" polygon modeling.

Sorry for the rather newb question, but it's been bugging me for a while.

BTW: What's up with NT forum search. I can't put "hard surface modeling" in the search and not have it choke.

JeffrySG
03-17-2009, 11:24 AM
If you're poly modeling I think you need to be weary of non-planar polys more than you need to worry about n-gons. N-gons really are not a problem if you are not getting rendering errors in poly models. Non-planar are more likely to give you issues with poly models in my experience. Subd is great for hard surface model too though. All depends on what you're after.

steamthunk
03-17-2009, 11:41 AM
Thanks. I find the need to use an excessive amount of hold geometry on some subd hard surface models. A long time ago (lw8.x) I was given the basic advice here to not go with subd weight maps and use geometry. Do people still think that? I prefer subd modeling.

I've found that large ngon areas get lit funny even when the surface is planar. Especially if said surface is somewhat transparent and/or reflective.

JeffrySG
03-17-2009, 11:56 AM
Thanks. I find the need to use an excessive amount of hold geometry on some subd hard surface models. A long time ago (lw8.x) I was given the basic advice here to not go with subd weight maps and use geometry. Do people still think that? I prefer subd modeling.

I've found that large ngon areas get lit funny even when the surface is planar. Especially if said surface is somewhat transparent and/or reflective.

People use both (poly / subd). There is no one better method. :)
Generally people recommend not-using subd weights. Especially if you are going between different applications. But if they work for you, go for it. I, personally, don't use them.

If you're getting messed up areas on the poly models try adjusting the smoothness setting of the surface for that part. Many times if I have a huge n-gon in a poly model I'll try to break it up a bit to end up with some areas that are less complex. They could be quads. Each model is different. Sometimes you'll get screen errors but not render issues as well.

Matt
03-17-2009, 12:48 PM
I use sub-ds where it would be a pain to do it using straight polys, and vice versa.

lwanmtr
03-18-2009, 01:27 AM
Any modeling, wether sub-d or poly has a certain amount of cleanup involved..I use both depending on how complex i need to get.

When using rounder, try not to round edges where 3 intersect if possible. I run into that alot and have to manually fix some of the extra geometry in those areas...tedious, yes, but welcome to the wonderful world of modeling...hehe.