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SuperNova32
03-03-2009, 04:53 PM
Hey guys, i need some help. Recently i was told that i needed to do a presentation on Graphic Art in todays world and i chose to do it on 3d animation and modelling but i have since run into a few problems. It is too big for one person to cover in a 5 minute presentation, so i was wondering if you guys could help me.

1. What would catch their attention?
2. Where should i start, for example should i show a video or start off with final renders from some of my work and so on
3. What would you rather see in a presentation about Animation and Modelling?

thanks for your help in advance :D

wacom
03-03-2009, 05:05 PM
When in doubt use powerpoint with very saturated blue, red, and lime/neon green. Add odd effects that make things bounce and fade out (like blinds or the funny digital one).

Hope that helps!:thumbsup:

No really- can you be more specific? Who is the audience and what is it that you're presenting? What angle are you supposed to be coming at it from?

THREEL
03-03-2009, 10:39 PM
Have you ever written an essay, or given a speech. This is basically the same thing, only in spoken and, pardon the pun, "graphic" form. IMHO, you should give them a beginning, middle, and an end.

In an essay, you start with an opening paragraph that touches on topics that belong to the theme, or "title" of your essay. the ensuing paragraphs cover, in more depth, each point that you wrote about in the opening paragraph. The ending paragraph of an essay summarizes the middle paragraphs. It can be, also, used to draw a conclusion, based on the evidence presented within the body of the essay.

Personally, I think you should write it out like an essay to begin with. Make sure you have 5 minutes worth of material, including any visual presentations that you want to use. Just one look at this forum will give you plenty of ideas of how 3D is used in the "graphic art" world. It's used in many areas, including film, TV, and print.

I think you should start off with your opening remarks (opening paragraph) to entice your audience with what's to come, or you could start off with the lights down low (theater style), show a 15 or 20 second exciting video clip, and then, pow, bring the lights up on you for your opening statement. Then, switch to the main body of your presentation, where you can use more timely still and/or moving visual imagery that goes along with your speech, just remember to keep the visuals short and sweet. Finally close with a killer conclusion that summarizes and shows the practically unlimited potential of 3D in the future.

Oh, make sure to use clips that are legally okay to show in this manner.

That's my brainstorming session for you. :)

tHREEL, but you can call me Al.

SuperNova32
03-04-2009, 04:17 PM
I meant, what should i include and what should i exclude in my presentation. This is not a very technologically savy crowd, they're just a group who is interested in graphic design but has no idea what it entails any ideas?

THREEL
03-05-2009, 12:40 AM
I meant, what should i include and what should i exclude in my presentation. This is not a very technologically savy crowd, they're just a group who is interested in graphic design but has no idea what it entails any ideas?

Maybe you could do a past, present, future type of presentation. You could show how 3D and computers have changed the face of graphic design. Cover different eras of graphic design, say every 20 years, or so, give-or-take. Include examples of hand drawn animation, claymation, actual models such as were used in the original Star Wars movies, then, hit them with your best 3D stuff. Recently, I saw someone's demo here, and some of their model fly-bys went from wireframe renders to finished surfacing. I thought that was a good way to show some of their work.

If your audience isn't that technologically savvy, then definitely stay away from how 3D is accomplished and concentrate on where, why, and what 3D is used to accomplish.

Nangleator
03-05-2009, 07:02 AM
THREEL gave good advice.

It's probably effective to have a slide of renders and photos and challenge the audience to determine which is 3D and which is photo and why they think that. The point is that the technology has come far enough along that it's possible to fool any audience.

An additional point could be illustrated if you describe the time and cost of doing a 3D render versus the time and cost of doing a comparable photo shoot.