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s4sha
12-20-2008, 12:28 AM
Greetings most honorable LW masters:

I am currently using Dreamweaver for web design, and would like to include Flash animation of 3D models for medical applications. I'm really considering LW, but have to admit I am a little worried about the learning curve. I was an avid user of Ray Dream Designer and Bryce waay back in the day, so that should tell you something.

I would LOVE a serious opinion - if I ordered LW with printed manuals, and having a basic knowledge and foundation of 3D modeling, how do you feel NewTek performs in providing an easy-to-follow method for learning LW?

I am willing to dive in, but it would really help to hear from honest, tried-and-true users in my decision to go with LW.

Thanks VERY MUCH!

S4sha

cagey5
12-20-2008, 02:48 AM
There's a wealth of information on learning Lightwave from paid courses to loads of free tutorials including well over 24 hours of animated tutorials from Newteks very own William Vaughan.

As regards learning curve, no 3D program is ever going to be a stroll in the park, but LW has a good advantage of text on the buttons rather than lots of icons that you need to continually re-learn as you forget them over time - Don't underestimate the value of that.

Plus we probably have one of the most knowledgeable, professional and helpful groups on these forums.

Like all new skills, it can be very frustrating at the start as many things can look counter intuitive but they are usually that way for a reason. Start at the beginning and walk before you try running and I think you'll find LW a good choice.

jin choung
12-20-2008, 03:38 AM
i use lw, blender and maya (almost exclusively maya for my day job) and i can tell you that for someone looking for a shallow learning curve, lw is pretty darn shallow compared to other options. actually, that is one of lw's biggest assets - it's pretty easy to wrap your head around.

also, for the stuff that you're talking about, lw is perfect and a terrific value (especially compared to something like maya).

for the purposes that you describe, lw should suit you but you don't need to wonder and jump in blind. do yourself a favor and get the demo and also check out your local barnes and noble or borders bookstore and find a lw book... the dan ablan books are good for a good overall introduction as are the quickstart books (the two tone ones with the rabbit on the cover). flip through them and try the demo and see if it'll work for you.

also, this forum is a terrific resource so if you have questions, you can search and ask here.

luck.

jin

Sarford
12-20-2008, 07:07 AM
also, this forum is a terrific resource so if you have questions, you can search and ask here.

This forum has also a very high entertainment value, especialy with the religion and politic threads, which I think, is also worth to point out ;)

StereoMike
12-20-2008, 10:02 AM
This board will feel like your second home in no time, really helpful and funny place. And lw is rather easy to catch compared to other solutions.

mike

s4sha
12-20-2008, 10:23 AM
Great input, everyone. Thanks very much.

StOuen
12-20-2008, 10:57 AM
If you are designing for Flash and web delivery, then you might also want to consider this: http://www.erain.com/

Either as a standalone or as a plugin to Lightwave or any other major 3D app you may be thinking of.

jasonwestmas
12-20-2008, 11:13 AM
Lots of genius bastards here, creative freaks and friendly arrogant types as well. For medical stuff, Lightwave all the way!

Tom Wood
12-20-2008, 12:02 PM
I jumped into 3D with no background in it at all with LightWave. My stuff is all Flash video for the web now, but the production chain is:

LightWave>Mirage(Aura/TVPaint)>VT4(Newtek VideoToaster)>FlixPro(encoding to FLV)

It depends on how complex you want to get with your models and animation. Most 3D web stuff is pretty basic simply because high detail gets lost in the compression and smaller sizing of the imagery. The biggest challenge I had was figuring out which parts of the program I'll never use (for example, hypervoxels) and setting that aside so I can concentrate on getting efficient with the parts of the program that I do use every day.

jin choung
12-20-2008, 08:42 PM
This forum has also a very high entertainment value, especialy with the religion and politic threads, which I think, is also worth to point out ;)

haha... absolutely. but that goes without saying... i think the thousand post+ politics threads kinda speak for themselves! : )

jin

Dexter2999
12-20-2008, 08:47 PM
Medical images....don't forget Volumedic.

Pricey, but WOW!

meatycheesyboy
12-20-2008, 11:03 PM
how do you feel NewTek performs in providing an easy-to-follow method for learning LW?


As people have said, there are very good resources out there to help learn LW but it is very fragmented in my opinion. William offers a ton of small video tutorials on behalf of NT but they're all over the map in terms of coverage. Newtek does not offer any comprehensive training that goes from the absolute begining then through the entire program that I am aware of.

Larry_g1s
12-20-2008, 11:36 PM
As with any 3D application, there is a learning curve, but with NewTek's FREE 24hrs of video training...you can't go wrong. ;)

Check those out and you'll get a feel for the learning curve.

http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/24hours_training.php

adamredwoods
12-21-2008, 06:57 PM
Cinema4D is also very user-friendly, but in these forums we are biased for Lightwave.
Carrara is probably closest to Bryce, and offers great value as well, but there is a "wall" that will be hit eventually in the terms of 3D potential.

I don't recommend Erain for anything too serious, since it is very difficult (IMHO) to model and texture in.

Ztreem
12-22-2008, 05:28 PM
I don't recommend Erain for anything too serious, since it is very difficult (IMHO) to model and texture in.

Don't forget that Swift3D also exist as a plugin for Lightwave so it's no need to model or animate in any other app than Lightwave.:thumbsup:

Sarford
12-22-2008, 06:33 PM
Hmmpff, if you don't mind me saying so... but Erains Swift 3D plug-in is a total waste of your money. It has absolutely no value. It makes HUGE flash files. You can better go full-blown raytracing and do some smart alpha channeling and you get significant smaller files which look way better than anyhing comming out of Swift 3D.

Even small stuf is nowdays better done in papervision then in Swift 3D. That program was never great but it certainly has had its time now. Don't waste your money on this.

jb_gfx
12-22-2008, 08:34 PM
Why do you want to loose your time learning a dead software ? There's plenty of choice of better apps than LightWave3D nowadays (XSI, C4D, Modo, Maya...). Go ahead and choose something else, with Lightwave you'll just loose your energy and time.

Andrewstopheles
12-22-2008, 09:37 PM
As people have said, there are very good resources out there to help learn LW but it is very fragmented in my opinion. William offers a ton of small video tutorials on behalf of NT but they're all over the map in terms of coverage. Newtek does not offer any comprehensive training that goes from the absolute begining then through the entire program that I am aware of.

I love Lightwave, but I have to agree. Sadly, Lightwave can be very difficult to understand. I have learned a lot of software very easy and very fast, but Lightwave was never easy for me. I found 3D Max easier. Maya is easier to learn in my opinion. Only Blender is worse in terms of learning curve. I already knew basic 3D animation (3D Max in college) and it still took a very long time with Lightwave, and I still struggle with it at times.

With a good instructor Lightwave could be learned in just a couple of weeks. For this reason I recommend the "Essential Lightwave" book and the "Inside Lightwave" books. These two tomes will get you up to speed very fast. I didn't have them when I was trying to learn. The texts included with Lightwave are abysmal and are only usefaul as reference. The video tutorials are excellent but you have to watch them all in order to get a sense of what Lightwave can do.

Just my honest opinion, folks, please don't hate! I truly love Lightwave, so much so that I bought it with my own money - the first software I have ever bought and paid for! I just wish it came with good tutorials, from beginner to expert, which it does not.

Stooch
12-22-2008, 10:26 PM
Why do you want to loose your time learning a dead software ? There's plenty of choice of better apps than LightWave3D nowadays (XSI, C4D, Modo, Maya...). Go ahead and choose something else, with Lightwave you'll just loose your energy and time.

and with that single word you have invalidated your pov and shown everyone how much of a second hand opinion whore you are :)

s4sha
12-22-2008, 10:55 PM
Ahh yes. THAT is what I was looking for. Good, honest, wholesome yet hardcore opinions. Thank you for that. All of you.

A good artist works with the medium he has been given, or chooses. Yet he creates more than could have been expected from all of them.

Cageman
12-23-2008, 04:39 AM
Hmm...

LightWave does have the best bang for the buck, especially during the 9.x cycle. I use Maya/LW/Motionbuilder at work and I also have my own LW-license. It's interresting to see comments that states that LW is dead, while there are alot of evidence on the contrary. It's starting to get old, really.

Hopefully NT will release some information on the upcoming 9.x release that has been in beta for a while now. That may change the opinion that LW is a "dead software". I also suggest anyone who thinks LW is dead to look around. You'll be surprised how much LW is used...

Regarding projectbased tutorials, I agree. There aren't that many around that are free. However, if you are willing to pay for learning material, there are plenty of those around.

Comparing NewTeks training with something Autodesk offers isn't really fair. One should remember that if you buy Maya or 3DS Max, you are also most likely going to have to pay for some kind of subscribtion. Only silver or gold members have access to a wealth of training, but they also pay for it.

Nothing is free, however, in the LW-community you often think about how little you have paid for the software and how much you get in terms of free tools, tips and tricks through the community. If you get involved with the community, you'll have a great time with LW... no doubt.

To end this post I found a very cool frontpage spot at CGTalk. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?threadid=709593&utm_medium=plugblock&utm_source=cgtalk) I also discovered that the same project recieved a frontpage at SpinQuad (http://spinquad.com/forums/showpost.php?p=240001&postcount=1) as well.
"To the 3D part we used Lightwave in all kind of process like modeling, lighting, animation and renders. The challenge in this job was to integrate well the 3D fish components with the dog live action to generate a new (and strange) creature but totally believable. This advertising was created to a Volkswagen car called Spacefox."

That is just ONE example of what LW is used for in production.

Mat
12-23-2008, 04:50 AM
I started using Corel dream 3d, then moved onto bryce, then started using autocad 3d modeler, had a acedemic version of 3ds max 2.5, then I started using Poser, then finaly purchased Lightwave 7.5, finaly I had something that worked for me.

Started using lightwave in 2003. I guess I wasn't new to 3d before I started using Lightwave, but still think that any newcomer should pick it up relitively fast because of its setup, I'd still give the demo a go.

Dirk
12-23-2008, 07:10 AM
Ahh yes. THAT is what I was looking for. Good, honest, wholesome yet hardcore opinions. Thank you for that. All of you.

A good artist works with the medium he has been given, or chooses. Yet he creates more than could have been expected from all of them.


Only few software developers would allow that kind of opinion in their forums. My guess is it's because the Newtek team is so confident in what they are doing and how Lightwave developes. And they have good reason; the next release of Lightwave is going to be awesome.

wfstecko
12-23-2008, 08:01 AM
I'm new to Lightwave, and still getting the feel of it. Before buying it I read some reviews comparing Lightwave and competing products. I liked what I was reading and decided on Lightwave. Being able to purchase it as a "companion upgrade" for Photoshop and After Effects users was a nice bonus. I didn't see any other companies offering that.

Walter

BeeVee
12-23-2008, 08:31 AM
It's worth noting that plugin is not necessary to make Flash output from LightWave. You do need to get to grips with LightWave's celshading, but then the individual frames can be output as PNGs and brought into Flash and autotraced. It's how William Vaughan made his Flash games.

B
PS. The fishdog project is even more impressive. I asked Mauro how the camera tracking was done expecting the answer Boujou or Syntheyes or something and no, they placed the video in the background in LightWave and matched visually.

meatycheesyboy
12-23-2008, 09:24 AM
Comparing NewTeks training with something Autodesk offers isn't really fair. One should remember that if you buy Maya or 3DS Max, you are also most likely going to have to pay for some kind of subscribtion. Only silver or gold members have access to a wealth of training, but they also pay for it.


Would it be fair to compare it to someone like Pixologic?

http://www.pixologic.com/zclassroom/homeroom/

They have a ton of free videos that take you through every aspect of the program, with no subscription model and with far fewer resources than someone like Autodesk (I don't know how their size compares to Newtek).

wacom
12-23-2008, 11:18 AM
If you're working on your own, or with just a very small group, and doing motion graphics or viz work, both LW and C4D are very good options as they are designer/illustrator/motion graphics friendly applications AND they have Mac support.

LW is nice because, while some of it might be a little "rustic" in it's current state and integration, it is relativly inexpensive and will accomplish 90% of your needs.

As far as being a waste of time- well I think that everyone should at least know one 3D application and dabble in another for a variety of reasons. LW is always a good tool to have around even if you use others- and it never hurts to have options!

The people that say go with maya or XSI etc. must be thinking you're going to purchase another render engine...because while I love mr in certain ways, user friendly on a beginner to intermediate level is not what I'd call it. At least with LW and C4D you'll be able to get something setup for render quickly. Materials in mr can be more complicated to setup IMHO and LW's old layer based system (not the nodes) can be still used for many FX etc.

Once we get a stack in LW 10 for deformations etc. then LW will be very nice for all sorts of things that are currently only easily done in packages like Houdini or XSI etc. Learning how to use those functions though takes time- lots of time IMHO.

This is the opinion of a LW and XSI user who does mainly illustration and graphics for a living (along side using illustrator a lot)...but would love to do more in 3D!

adamredwoods
12-23-2008, 11:48 AM
Why do you want to loose your time learning a dead software ? There's plenty of choice of better apps than LightWave3D nowadays (XSI, C4D, Modo, Maya...). Go ahead and choose something else, with Lightwave you'll just loose your energy and time.

Dead software? XSI is gone, dude, where have you been?

Dexter2999
12-23-2008, 12:04 PM
I love Lightwave, but I have to agree. Sadly, Lightwave can be very difficult to understand. I have learned a lot of software very easy and very fast, but Lightwave was never easy for me. I found 3D Max easier. Maya is easier to learn in my opinion. Only Blender is worse in terms of learning curve. I already knew basic 3D animation (3D Max in college) and it still took a very long time with Lightwave, and I still struggle with it at times.

Just my honest opinion, folks, please don't hate! I truly love Lightwave, so much so that I bought it with my own money - the first software I have ever bought and paid for! I just wish it came with good tutorials, from beginner to expert, which it does not.

Granted it is your opinion. And perhaps for you, You found other software easier to learn. But professionals like Dan Ablan, Larry Shultz, and Tim Albee have all commented that of the packages they know LW has the lowest learning curve.

And for the comparison to Pixologic. They do have alot of videos and a comparable price point. How is their renderer? Do they have real camera distortions or hypervoxels? It is kind of hard to make a head to head comparison.

Yes, there is probably more training for Maya, XSI,a nd 3dMax out there. But they all have subscription fees. They will all have a no resale clause in the EULA. And they all cost more.

I could recommend the path I took. I bought Dan Ablan's 3D Garage training. Which qualified for an EDU version of LW. So I got training and the software to try out. When I finished, I had a paying gig lined up. I upgraded to the FULL version of LW and the gig payed for it.

I would also recommend flay.com for people looking for tutorials as well as foundation3d.com. It isn't a course with structure, but alot of people have put out alot of good information out there for free.

Anyway, good luck with your decision.

Larry_g1s
12-23-2008, 12:11 PM
I just wish it came with good tutorials, from beginner to expert, which it does not.How is the 24 hrs of free video training not good? :question: It's WAY more then I got with Maya.

meatycheesyboy
12-23-2008, 12:21 PM
And for the comparison to Pixologic. They do have alot of videos and a comparable price point. How is their renderer? Do they have real camera distortions or hypervoxels? It is kind of hard to make a head to head comparison.

But a head to head comparison of the apps wasn't what I was trying to do. I was comparing the effort put out by the parent companies to get training materials out there. I have already acknowledged that there is a ton of training in the form of the 24 hours of videos but as I said, it's nowhere near comprehensive the way the Pixologic videos are. If I were an absolute beginer and I watched all 24 hours of the LW vids, I still wouldn't be able to do much since I still wouldn't really understand the fundamentals of the program but with the Pixologic vids, I could go from nothing to having a fairly good grasp of the program by watching their videos.

Larry_g1s
12-23-2008, 12:25 PM
But a head to head comparison of the apps wasn't what I was trying to do. I was comparing the effort put out by the parent companies to get training materials out there. I have already acknowledged that there is a ton of training in the form of the 24 hours of videos but as I said, it's nowhere near comprehensive the way the Pixologic videos are. If I were an absolute beginer and I watched all 24 hours of the LW vids, I still wouldn't be able to do much since I still wouldn't really understand the fundamentals of the program but with the Pixologic vids, I could go from nothing to having a fairly good grasp of the program by watching their videos.Then I would say you haven't watched the videos, because that's a joke.

meatycheesyboy
12-23-2008, 12:37 PM
Then I would say you haven't watched the videos, because that's a joke.

It is true that I haven't watched all of the vids but I did recently have a colleague who downloaded the demo of LW after seeing me work in it having never used it before and watched through about 4 hours of videos before giving up because he still didn't know the first thing about the interface.

Since this is the internet, I guess the next logical step would be for you to tell me that my co-worker is an idiot or something similar right? :)

I'm not saying that the 24 hours aren't great, they absolutely are. But they don't offer a comprehensive solution. The OP asked if Newtek offered any training that went from start to finish to teach you the program, I still stand by my initial answer of no, they don't.

Maybe I would see how the vids work in progression if they were presented in some sort of progression but they aren't, the first video is "how do I setup Distance to Object in the Node editor". If you're looking for basic training, is that really the place to start?

Larry_g1s
12-23-2008, 12:45 PM
It is true that I haven't watched all of the vids but I did recently have a colleague who downloaded the demo of LW after seeing me work in it having never used it before and watched through about 4 hours of videos before giving up because he still didn't know the first thing about the interface.

Since this is the internet, I guess the next logical step would be for you to tell me that my co-worker is an idiot or something similar right? :)

I'm not saying that the 24 hours aren't great, they absolutely are. But they don't offer a comprehensive solution. The OP asked if Newtek offered any training that went from start to finish to teach you the program, I still stand by my initial answer of no, they don't.

Maybe I would see how the vids work in progression if they were presented in some sort of progression but they aren't, the first video is "how do I setup Distance to Object in the Node editor". If you're looking for basic training, is that really the place to start?The first section of Modeler and Layout are discussing the absolute basics of the interface, check it out for yourself.

adamredwoods
12-23-2008, 12:46 PM
It is true that I haven't watched all of the vids but I did recently have a colleague who downloaded the demo of LW after seeing me work in it having never used it before and watched through about 4 hours of videos before giving up because he still didn't know the first thing about the interface.

Hm. It's a valid point, but most 3D apps are SO SIMILAR these days in their basic functionality, that it's just a matter of finding where the menus are.

So I guess for an absolute 3D beginner, then it'd be good to have that "BEGINNER STARTING POINT" video. When I started back in the 90's, it was with 3DS Max and I didn't know what the 4 viewports were.

meatycheesyboy
12-23-2008, 12:49 PM
The first section of Modeler and Layout are discussing the absolute basics of the interface, check it out for yourself.

I stand corrected.

I looked at the 24 hours thing here: ftp://ftp.newtek.com/multimedia/movies/w3dw/WV_LightwaveTraining.html

I forgot to check the vids located at http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/tutorials.php where things are actually organized.

Thanks Larry_g1s

Maybe they should either organize the ftp page into categories or they should just get rid of it and always point to the html?

Larry_g1s
12-23-2008, 12:50 PM
I stand corrected.

I looked at the 24 hours thing here: ftp://ftp.newtek.com/multimedia/movies/w3dw/WV_LightwaveTraining.html

I forgot to check the vids located at http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/tutorials.php where things are actually organized.

Thanks Larry_g1s

Maybe they should either organize the ftp page into categories or they should just get rid of it and always point to the html?You bet. :thumbsup:
Believe me, I wish there was something like this for Maya.

geothefaust
12-23-2008, 12:53 PM
I wouldn't say the videos are for beginners, but, some of them are close.

But then again, shouldn't someone RTFM while they are learning the interface? The manual goes into detail about it, I always thought the manual would be the place to find that information. Not training videos. I don't see any videos out there teaching the interface for ZBrush or Blender, which both have horrible interfaces (OK Blender's isn't that bad, but it's close). LWs interface isn't cluttered with hieroglyphs throughout, unlike other applications. I prefer the text interface. In fact when I use XSI I set the interface to text as well.

EDIT: The point is, text is easier to learn, hieroglyphs are not.

Cageman
12-23-2008, 12:58 PM
I have to agree on that sentiment...

A tutorial (or series of tutorials) that shows how to model, lets say.. a rabbit, assign various surfaces, work with some fur, bring it into Layout, light and render it would be quite basic but still show a hell of alot of tools. That could then be added upon with additional tutorials going more into renderbuffers (for example) and how to use those in an app like fusion. Maybe model a campfire for the rabbit and have a look at how to make the fire with particles... maybe the rabbit is standing in knee-deep grass and it rains...

I mean... yeah.. if NT plans ahead, they could create a single project that, whatever they want to show, could become a mini-project within the main project. Above all, it would give the user a sense of continuation. As it is now, alot of the tools are shown, but sometimes little out of context...sort of..

EDIT:

Bottomline: Project-driven tutorials for beginners. More advanced users may benefit from 2 minutes "look at this feature" videos.

meatycheesyboy
12-23-2008, 12:58 PM
I wouldn't say the videos are for beginners, but, some of them are close.

But then again, shouldn't someone RTFM while they are learning the interface? The manual goes into detail about it, I always thought the manual would be the place to find that information. Not training videos. I don't see any videos out there teaching the interface for ZBrush or Blender, which both have horrible interfaces (OK Blender's isn't that bad, but it's close). LWs interface isn't cluttered with hieroglyphs throughout, unlike other applications. I prefer the text interface. In fact when I use XSI I set the interface to text as well.

I do agree that someone's training should start with the manual.

I don't agree with what you said about Blender and Zbrush though
http://www.blender.org/education-help/tutorials/
The first tutorial on the right is called "Blender User Interface"
and for Zbrush they introduce to the interface slowly throughout the first 5 or 6 videos.

Larry_g1s
12-23-2008, 01:00 PM
edit: The point is, text is easier to learn, hieroglyphs are not.100% agree!! If you know how to read, you don't have to guess what it is.

Dexter2999
12-23-2008, 01:01 PM
But a head to head comparison of the apps wasn't what I was trying to do. I was comparing the effort put out by the parent companies to get training materials out there. I have already acknowledged that there is a ton of training in the form of the 24 hours of videos but as I said, it's nowhere near comprehensive the way the Pixologic videos are. If I were an absolute beginer and I watched all 24 hours of the LW vids, I still wouldn't be able to do much since I still wouldn't really understand the fundamentals of the program but with the Pixologic vids, I could go from nothing to having a fairly good grasp of the program by watching their videos.


I know what you are saying. And it's true they have great training. But what I was trying to get at is they don't have as great a capability and therefore as much ground to cover when trying to explain their application. LW covers ALOT of ground. Pixologic is bit more specific in what it does and so rightly they can concentrate on those abilities.

And your friend sounds too much like me. Not wanting to watch the introductory videos, just wants to leap into the "cool stuff" ;)

Cageman
12-23-2008, 01:07 PM
A very good example of an additional tutorial (in project-driven tutorial series) would be Shading Models found on this URL. (http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/tutorials.php)

geothefaust
12-23-2008, 01:09 PM
I do agree that someone's training should start with the manual.

I don't agree with what you said about Blender and Zbrush though
http://www.blender.org/education-help/tutorials/
The first tutorial on the right is called "Blender User Interface"
and for Zbrush they introduce to the interface slowly throughout the first 5 or 6 videos.

So Blender does! But I skipped over them I see. I dived in, found it clunky, but learned them anyway. As it wasn't so bad. I now definitely have a good understanding of most of the modeling functions and hotkeys in Blender. Plus most of the interface is text.

But ZBrush doesn't have interface specific tutorials that I'm aware of. I've gone through project based tutorials to learn it's interface. I searched and searched for months back when I was learning it for some kind of comprehensive video, but alas, nothing. Plenty project based videos and written stuff of course.

My point still stands. I'll just quote Larry_g1s here... :)

100% agree!! If you know how to read, you don't have to guess what it is.

JeffrySG
12-23-2008, 01:28 PM
You can't also deny the fact that when a single question can generate this much community input and feedback it is a huge benefit. 45 replies already. That can be worth its weight in gold sometimes! Especially when you are learning new software or stuck on a project, etc.

Andyjaggy
12-23-2008, 04:49 PM
I love Lightwave, but I have to agree. Sadly, Lightwave can be very difficult to understand.

I've had the exact opposite experience, I started off with Lightwave and 3D Max. Lightwave made sense, Max didn't. It was as simple as that..

Now 4 years later I am in a situation where I have to learn Max again, and guess what, it still doesn't make sense to me. I'm slowly figuring it out but I think it's causing me to loose hair, and I don't think I will ever feel as comfortable in it as I do in Lightwave. Maybe that will change as I use it regularly, maybe not.

GregMalick
12-23-2008, 05:53 PM
BTW, the current issue of 3D World has a fairly good review of LW9.5

I also agree that LW is a very logical, easy to grasp program.
There are also many free and cheap tutorials to get you up and running.
Even most old training videos by B.Peebler are still applicable to recent releases.

Cageman
12-23-2008, 06:45 PM
You can't also deny the fact that when a single question can generate this much community input and feedback it is a huge benefit. 45 replies already. That can be worth its weight in gold sometimes! Especially when you are learning new software or stuck on a project, etc.

Yes... involving oneself in the community is probably the second best investment one can do if using LightWave. There are several of us who release free tutorials from time to time to show techniques or workflows.

A huge :thumbsup: for the LW-community! :)

jasonwestmas
12-23-2008, 07:03 PM
I like your tuts Cageman, thanks!

s4sha
12-30-2008, 11:19 PM
WOW. That sums it up for me. I have to admit I am VERY impressed by all of your (LW community) involvement in my humble request for info. All of your responses mean a great deal to me. A GREAT deal. Most of you probably have no idea how great, but thanks all the same. All of you have contributed to an old dog's desire and ability to learn new tricks.

Happy New Year to all of you, especially the folks at NewTek who apparently are providing the media for this old artist's next work.

s4sha
01-18-2009, 09:09 PM
I finally got v9 full from NewTek's store. Today was the first day to play with it- did a simple animation based on NewTek's particle tutorial..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQ3xeg5fOM4

I know it's simple, but hey, it's my first day! Thanks all for your input and I'm glad to finally be diving into Lightwave- It's been a long time coming.

colkai
01-19-2009, 02:19 AM
Well here is the place to ask questions, overall, it's a grand community and there is a LOT of talent around who have never got too big to help the new guy. :)

StereoMike
01-19-2009, 03:53 AM
Welcome S4sha! Good decision :)
My first animation was a lot worse!
Have a good time and feel free to ask if you encounter problems. This board wil be a great help!

mike

dnch
01-23-2009, 11:52 AM
It is true that I haven't watched all of the vids but I did recently have a colleague who downloaded the demo of LW after seeing me work in it having never used it before and watched through about 4 hours of videos before giving up because he still didn't know the first thing about the interface.

Since this is the internet, I guess the next logical step would be for you to tell me that my co-worker is an idiot or something similar right? :)

I'm not saying that the 24 hours aren't great, they absolutely are. But they don't offer a comprehensive solution. The OP asked if Newtek offered any training that went from start to finish to teach you the program, I still stand by my initial answer of no, they don't.

Maybe I would see how the vids work in progression if they were presented in some sort of progression but they aren't, the first video is "how do I setup Distance to Object in the Node editor". If you're looking for basic training, is that really the place to start?

4 hours? are you kidding? im using lightwave for almost 10 years now and im still learning! but it would be the same for me in any software (max,maya,xsi) because its not about the software but about learning 3d stuff in general.

anyway i watched some gnomon videos for xsi and max (building, lighting and rendering interiors) and most of the things would take me quarter of the time (offcourse without commenting what i am doing)

somewhere in times of MAX2.5 i tried it and i could not remember those fricking 20px x 20px icons of teapot.. they are gone now.. good.. i wanted to try modern MAX, but ill wait for LW10:) ... and autodesk sucks (like adobe)

.. you will really appreciate those text buttons (which name in many cases represent they true meaning in industry) and those awesome shortucts in modeller mainy

meathead
01-23-2009, 07:47 PM
Some of these responses are ludicrous (like the guy who called LW dying). Huh?

This is just one man's opinion, but there are a million reasons to choose LW. It's probably the 2nd best best bang for the buck 3D (complete solution) software out there- obviously Blender being free makes it number one- but their is other cost for being free. For less than $900 -really easily less than $500 (just go to the classified section here), you get a complete answer. LW allows licenses to be sold to second parties, you can install that on many computers because of the dongle lock (can only use it on one computer at a time though). Ohh yeah, I also received Speededit for free with my purchase- I love Speededit, really, I no longer use my Adobe Premiere Pro.

In a software world of companies doing very little to there programs, yet basically forcing you to upgrade (I cringe at the last 2 Adobe Photoshop upgrades) LW has given the away the farm. Just read this forum for a little, see the complaints about how some other 3D packages have come up with crazy cost schemes, and too many options for too many thousands of dollars for a "complete" software.

The non stop free 9 update cycle has been so robust it's silly, and most of these people even got that v9 from v8.5 upgrade for free?!?!?

The resources (like this place) are also robust. I started on 3Dmax, used Maya for a while, ended up here. All my fellow 3D (using max) artist think LW has by far the most -free- online help and tutorials - to make up for on of the worst manuals.

I worry in this current economic climate, that a small, private company like Newtek may be giving away too much. Programmers, marketing, sales all cost money, I hope they are making some of it.

Cageman
01-23-2009, 09:44 PM
The non stop free 9 update cycle has been so robust it's silly, and most of these people even got that v9 from v8.5 upgrade for free?!?!?

I'm one of those. :D

And I agree... it's been silly... It just goes to show HOW MUCH NewTek care about thier customers. There is a saying that there is no such thing as a free lunch, but alas, I paid for LW8.3 and got ALL updates since then for FREE. Oh, and yeah... NewTek gave away LWCad 1.0 (I think it was that version) for free to ALL registered customers as well...

Crazy-cool!

:I_Love_Ne

jasonwestmas
01-24-2009, 12:51 PM
I'm one of those. :D

And I agree... it's been silly... It just goes to show HOW MUCH NewTek care about thier customers. There is a saying that there is no such thing as a free lunch, but alas, I paid for LW8.3 and got ALL updates since then for FREE. Oh, and yeah... NewTek gave away LWCad 1.0 (I think it was that version) for free to ALL registered customers as well...

Crazy-cool!

:I_Love_Ne

No, it was LWCad1.5 ;)

s4sha
02-04-2009, 10:32 PM
Okay, now I'm a little nervous. I have been learning LW9.6 on my own after dropping over $1K. No regrets, It's actually a dream come true for me. I love the interface, love the capabilities, have had some bugs so far (some I have read about in this forum), but overall I am happy and getting comfortable with it.

Okay, so now we have CORE. I missed the live video, as work has been nuts, but someone please tell me that I didn't make a mistake buying v9 and will have to spend more $$ to get "with the program" and be up-to-date with the latest offering.

Don't get me wrong, I am SO glad that NewTek is plowing forward in the industry, and not being absorbed by the "other guy."

My question is this- Should I keep plugging along in my LW tutorials and not worry about CORE, or drop more $$ to take the opportunity to be a part of CORE at it's birth? I really don't mind supporting NewTek financially, but I think there will be a problem if I have to tell my son he can't play baseball this season because daddy found a really cool new tool for visual development he has to buy.

Thanks to all of you, and I hope I'm not being the irritating newb.

colkai
02-05-2009, 02:44 AM
Not irritating at all, it's a very valid question.
Truth be told it depends on you, what your budget is and if you think you can take advantage of Core from the get-go.
My personal feeling is, Core is going to take a while to reach full maturity and be stable, in that time, I'd stick to using LW9.6 for the main work.
If you can afford to move up, then there is no harm in becoming comfortable with Core whilst using LW9.6 so that when the time comes, your switch to using it is easier.

Also highly depends on if you are using it in a paying job or as a hobby, then the money becomes more important, if it's a paying gig, you have the luxury of including the costs in your accounts.

StereoMike
02-05-2009, 04:02 AM
Okay, now I'm a little nervous. I have been learning LW9.6 on my own after dropping over $1K. No regrets, It's actually a dream come true for me. I love the interface, love the capabilities, have had some bugs so far (some I have read about in this forum), but overall I am happy and getting comfortable with it.

Okay, so now we have CORE. I missed the live video, as work has been nuts, but someone please tell me that I didn't make a mistake buying v9 and will have to spend more $$ to get "with the program" and be up-to-date with the latest offering.

Don't get me wrong, I am SO glad that NewTek is plowing forward in the industry, and not being absorbed by the "other guy."

My question is this- Should I keep plugging along in my LW tutorials and not worry about CORE, or drop more $$ to take the opportunity to be a part of CORE at it's birth? I really don't mind supporting NewTek financially, but I think there will be a problem if I have to tell my son he can't play baseball this season because daddy found a really cool new tool for visual development he has to buy.

Thanks to all of you, and I hope I'm not being the irritating newb.

I'd contact Newtek sales dept. and ask what to do. They are very fair in that regard, I wouldn't be surprised if they give you a year of hardcore for free, cause you just bought LW9 some days ago.
And starting today you get LW9 + 1 year harcore for 895$, I don't think they'll punish you for buying two weeks too early.
mike

s4sha
02-06-2009, 08:04 AM
Good idea-- I guess it can't hurt to ask. Great info everyone. Thanks again

MiniFireDragon
02-06-2009, 08:18 AM
Well, all I can say is I have the Marcomedia Suite MX (Just went to the current Creative Design Suite) and I still haven't mashed Flash into my brain.

Lightwave was more fun. You don't need to know scripting to get it to do something cool. But Keyframing is keyframing. It's kind of the same way across all platforms.